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Briefs: Cancer helps Olmert poll numbers, Mrs. El Presidente in Argentina—still good for the Jews

November 1, 2007 | 8:00 pm

President-elect Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner

President-elect Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner

Olmert's Popularity Buoyed by Cancer

Ehud Olmert's disclosure that he has prostate cancer edged up his approval ratings. A poll commissioned by Yediot Achronot after Olmert's surprise announcement Monday found that 41 percent of Israelis "appreciate" his performance as prime minister, up from 35 percent last month.

Olmert, whose popularity plummeted after last year's Lebanon war and amid ongoing corruption allegations, also got high marks in the survey for his "bravery" in coming forward, an act that 61 percent of respondents said they found moving. Eighty-seven percent of respondents agreed with Olmert's decision to stay in office. But asked which among Olmert, Defense Minister Ehud Barak, and opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu is most fit to be prime minister, 14 percent said Olmert, 17 percent said Barak and 35 percent said Netanyahu. Yediot did not say how many people were polled. The margin of error was 4.3 percent.

Argentine Vote Means No Change for Jews

Argentina's new president likely will not change government policies toward the Jewish community.

The victory by current first lady and senator Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner in national elections Sunday will be a continuation of official policies regarding Jewish interests, according to Aldo Donzis, president of the DAIA, Argentina's Jewish umbrella organization. The government of her husband, Nestor Kirschner, was active in seeking justice for the terrorist attack on the Jewish community building in Buenos Aires in 1994, and initiated projects to fight anti-Semitism, discrimination and xenophobia.

The first lady and now president-elect was active in these efforts, according to Donzis. On Monday morning, with 97 percent of the election results calculated, Fernandez de Kirchner had garnered 45 percent of the vote. She needed at least 40 percent to avoid a runoff. In the capital city of Buenos Aires, where most of the Jewish community resides, she received 23 percent of the vote.

Alleged Syrian Reactor in 2003 Photo

A 2003 photo shows the alleged nuclear reactor Israel bombed in Syria last month under construction. The Sept. 16, 2003 photo, released by GeoEye, an aerial image archive in Dulles, Va., and published in Saturday's New York Times, suggests that Syria's nuclear weapons program long predates the Sept. 6 Israeli attack. Initial reports suggested that the reactor Israel allegedly targeted was in its nascent stage. Israel, Syria and the United States will not confirm the nature of the attack.

Rabin Killer Can't Attend Brit

Yitzhak Rabin's jailed assassin lost an appeal to be allowed to attend the circumcision of his first son. Israel's High Court of Justice on Tuesday turned down a petition by Yigal Amir for a special furlough on Nov. 4, when his son is to be circumcised. Amir had argued that he should not be denied leave rights granted to other convicted murderers in Israel.

Amir's wife, Larissa, became pregnant during a conjugal visit to the prison where Amir is serving a life sentence in isolation. She gave birth on Sunday. The fact that the circumcision will take place exactly 12 years after Amir gunned down Prime Minister Rabin at a Tel Aviv peace rally has stoked the ire of Israelis opposed to seeing the assassin enjoy any jailhouse leniency.

Terrorism Led Portman Into Activism

The anguish of a friend grieving over a terror victim in Israel led actress Natalie Portman to become an activist.

"When I was at Harvard, a very close friend lost someone to the violence in Israel," the Israeli-born movie star says in a first-person essay that appeared this weekend in Parade magazine. "I felt so helpless watching her pain. I really wanted to do something, but I didn't know where to begin. Coming from Israel, I know how polarized that part of the world scene can be."

Portman called Jordanian Queen Rania, a Palestinian, who told Portman about the Foundation for International Community Assistance. The group, Portman says, "grants loans, mostly to women, to start small businesses. Rather than donate food, it helps people earn the money to buy their own food and gives women the opportunity to better their lives."

Portman has since traveled to Central America and Africa for the foundation.

"It's impossible to know the outcome of anything," she writes. "You have no idea whether the life you impact will go on to bring peace to the Middle East or will go blow up a building. All you can do is act with the best intention and have faith."

Israeli Film Takes Top Prize in Kiev

An Israeli film took the top prize at a Kiev film festival. "The Band's Visit" received the Grand Prix and $10,000 at the 37th Molodist ("Youth") International Film Festival on Sunday.

It was the first feature-length film by 34-year-old Israeli filmmaker Eran Kolirin. The whimsical tale, which has won other awards, follows the iconoclastic adventures of a band of Egyptian musicians who are lost in a small town in Israel's Negev Desert. Ukrainian President Viktor Yuschenko participated in the festival's opening.

'The Tribe' Hits No. 1 on iTunes

A documentary about Jewish identity is in the No. 1 spot of most downloaded short films on iTunes. Tiffany Shlain, director of "The Tribe," a humorous look at American Jewish identity through the lens of Barbie, says she launched her film on iTunes Oct. 2, hoping to crack the top 10 list. It is now the first independent documentary to hit No. 1, Shlain notes.

"This says there's an audience that wants to watch documentaries about American Jewish identity," says Shlain, who lives in Mill Valley, Calif. "This opens the doors for other filmmakers and expands the options of what is available to download." The other films in the top 10 are all by major studies such as Disney and Pixar, except for the indie "West Bank Story," in the No. 7 spot, which won this year's Academy Award for Best Short Film.

"The Tribe," released in December 2005, was shown at 75 film festivals, including Sundance and Tribeca, and won nine awards. It is available at www.tribethefilm.com, along with a discussion kit that is used by educators in many Jewish and secular classrooms.



Superman Is Jewish

A Paris exhibit on comic strips shows that Superman is Jewish. The exhibit, at the Museum of Jewish Art and History in Paris, makes it clear "that Superman is Jewish," Samuel Blumenfeld and Yves-Marie Labe write in the French newspaper Le Monde. And even Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels knew it.

In comments translated in the Eurotopics online newsletter, the writers say that "When the 'Iron Man' destroyed the Atlantic wall and the Siegfried line well before D-day, ...Goebbels shouted in a meeting that 'Superman is Jewish.' What was an insult is now to be taken as something quite evident."

The Superman comic strip was created in 1932 by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Schuster, both sons of Jewish immigrants, and sold to D.C. Comics in 1938.



Briefs courtesy of Jewish Telegraphic Agency.



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