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Believe in an angry God? You’re less likely to cheat

by Brad A. Greenberg

April 30, 2011 | 4:25 pm

From the Department of No Kidding (and via the Los Angeles Times):

A new study on the link between one’s view of God and willingness to cheat on a test is the latest example of social scientists wading into the highly charged field of religion and morality.

The study, titled “Mean Gods Make Good People: Different Views of God Predict Cheating Behavior” was peer reviewed and published earlier this month in the International Journal for the Psychology of Religion.

In line with many previous studies, it found no difference between the ethical behavior of believers and nonbelievers. But those who believed in a loving, compassionate God were more likely to cheat than those who believed in an angry, punitive God.

“The take-home message is not whether you believe in God, but what God you believe in,” said Azim Shariff, a psychologist at the University of Oregon. Shariff conducted the study with psychologist Ara Norenzayan, who had been his doctoral advisor at the University of British Columbia.

I don’t exactly agree with Shariff’s characterization of the findings. It’s not what God you believe in. (Even if it was, the correct interrogative would be “which.”) But it is about the qualities you believe God has.

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