Jewish Journal

Tag: World War Ii

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  • At least two die in police raid on group planning new Paris attack

    1 week ago

    A woman suicide bomber blew herself up in a police raid on Wednesday that sources said had foiled a jihadi plan to hit Paris's business district, days after a wave of attacks killed 129 across the French capital.

    Police stormed an apartment in the Paris suburb of St. Denis before...

  • Jewish groups ‘disappointed’ over GOP’s stance on refugees

    1 week ago

    Republican governors and presidential candidates came under fire on Monday by their Democratic counterparts and several Jewish organizations for suggesting to halt any effort of welcoming Syrian refugees into the United States, citing the fear of ISIS infiltrators, in the aftermath...

  • Hitler was shrewd, not so hypnotic, new German biography says

    2 weeks ago

    A new biography of Hitler by a prominent German historian is likely to stir controversy with its argument that the Nazi leader's political acumen has been underestimated and that the belief in his hypnotic grip over Germans is inflated.

    Peter Longerich's "Hitler," to be published...

  • What I learned on Kibbutz Kfar Menachem

    By Gina Nahai

    3 weeks ago

    You forget, you know, that there are other ways to live. Other than the daily pursuit of “more,” the constant reaching for success, the persistent longing for recognition, validation — for youth and beauty, intimacy and affection. 

    Out on Kibbutz Kfar Menachem — 36 miles...

  • The truth about Jerusalem’s grand mufti, Hitler and the Holocaust

    October 21, 2015 | 1:36 pm

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu went too far in recent comments that Nazi collaborator Haj Amin al-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem before and during World War II, played a “central role in fomenting the Final Solution” by trying to convince Hitler to destroy the...

  • Could guns for German Jews have prevented the Holocaust?

    By Tom Tugend

    October 13, 2015 | 4:32 pm

    In the mid-1930s, an English scholar wrote a book — with many learned citations — proving that Nazism was the wave of the future and made for a happier and healthier nation.

    In reviewing the book, one critic noted that if the distinguished author had spent only one day actually...

  • Ben Carson blames gun control for the Holocaust

    October 8, 2015 | 2:19 pm

    Republican presidential hopeful Ben Carson blamed gun control for the extent of the Holocaust.

    In an interview Thursday on CNN, Carson said fewer people would have been killed by the Nazis had more citizens been armed.

    “I think the likelihood of Hitler being able to accomplish...

  • A Polish spy named Magda

    By Tom Tugend

    September 21, 2015 | 6:50 pm

    “I don’t know how I did it, but I did it,” declares 93-year old Magda Kasprzycki, a West Hollywood resident, in the eponymous documentary “Magda.”

    The “it” unwinds gradually in the 60-minute film, starting with a sheltered childhood in an affluent, scholarly family in the Polish...

  • Ester Wilhelm Tepper

    By Jane Ulman

    September 8, 2015 | 3:46 pm

    In the early morning darkness of Oct. 9, 1942, Ester Tepper (née Estera Wilhelm), just 10 years old, stood half-dressed and shivering in her family’s apartment in the Radomsko ghetto, which was surrounded by German soldiers. Ester’s mother, Gucia, had awoken Ester and her two older...

  • German Holocaust film ‘Phoenix’ examines life after death camps

    By Tom Tugend

    July 29, 2015 | 11:33 am

    The phoenix is a mythical firebird that lives for centuries, dies in flames and then rises from its ashes to start life anew.

    Phoenix is the name of a nightclub in 1945 Berlin, a city consumed by Allied bombs and Russian canons, trying to rise again after Germany’s crushing...

  • Nicholas Winton, the ‘British Schindler,’ dies aged 106

    July 1, 2015 | 10:29 am

    A man who became known as the "British Schindler" for saving hundreds of Czech children from Nazi persecution in the run-up to World War II, has died at the age of 106.

    Nicholas Winton died on Wednesday with his daughter Barbara and two grandchildren at his side, according to a...

  • A Father’s Day gift of justice

    By David Suissa

    June 18, 2015 | 5:24 pm

    If you ever visit the Vienna campus of Wirtschafts University Wien (WU), one of Europe’s most prestigious universities, you will see a translucent metal sculpture in the shape of a globe, which prominently features the names of 150 Jews. I got to hear the story of that dramatic...

  • Father’s Day: The lesson of free speech

    By Ellie Kahn, Oral Historian

    June 17, 2015 | 3:24 pm

    Dean Okrand is an Emmy-winning sound re-recording mixer, husband and father of two adult daughters. His own father was Fred Okrand, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Southern California for more than 60 years, and its first legal director. Fred, born in...

  • ‘Bent’ but not broken

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    June 1, 2015 | 4:02 pm

    After Martin Sherman granted The New York Times an interview about his 1979 play, “Bent,” a groundbreaking drama that for the first time spotlighted the Nazi persecution of gays onstage, the Times reporter phoned Sherman three separate times to confirm whether the author truly...

  • Broadcast newsman Murray Fromson looks back at storied career

    May 28, 2015 | 5:18 pm

    As a young child growing up in the Bronx, N.Y., Murray Fromson admired Edward R. Murrow’s reports from London during World War II.

    “I was enamored of him,” Fromson said. “I’d go to sleep with a pencil under my pillow, pretending it was a microphone.”

    Not only did Fromson...

  • My dad was in the Army

    May 21, 2015 | 5:27 pm

    My dad was like no other. 

    He was an accomplished CPA. That in itself might not seem so unusual, but how many accountants do you know who are also adept at wilderness survival? He could identify all of the animal tracks and scat. He knew the differences between poison ivy and...

  • Effy (Efraim) Pfeffermann

    By Jane Ulman

    May 20, 2015 | 11:50 am

    On a December day in 1941, 9-year-old Effy Pfeffermann, along with his stepfather and mother, Jacob and Rachel Singer, each carrying a small suitcase, quietly slipped out of their two-bedroom apartment in Timisoara, Romania, deliberately leaving the lights on. They boarded a train...

  • Israel reborn: we were there

    By Tom Tugend

    May 19, 2015 | 12:15 pm

    In mid-May of 1948, I was walking down Market Street in San Francisco when I passed a small movie theater that screened only newsreels.

    The outside marquee announced “The Jews Fight for Their State.” For the first time it fully hit me that the Jews — commonly dismissed at the...

  • Two survivors speak out on the anniversaries of the Armenian Genocide and the liberation of Auschwitz

    April 17, 2015 | 12:02 pm

    This article is being jointly run with Asbarez — a publication serving the Armenian-American community.


    This year marks the passage of two major anniversaries that reveal man’s unbelievable capacity for cruelty and evil. It has been 100 years since the outbreak of the...

  • Josef Kreitenberg

    By Jane Ulman

    April 15, 2015 | 2:57 pm

    As the transport from Tacova, Czechoslovakia (then called Tecso, Hungary), pulled up to the Birkenau platform in late May 1944, the doors of the cattle cars slammed open. “Raus, raus,” the SS shouted, directing those fit for work into separate men’s and women’s lines. The others,...

  • Letters reveal a Jewish businessman’s struggle with family requests from Nazi Germany

    April 15, 2015 | 1:45 pm

    Although it was more than a decade ago, I still remember the phone call. The excited voice at the other end that went on and on regardless of whether I uttered a response. Attorney Roger Blane had a donation for the American Jewish Committee Archives, where I work as the director....

  • Manuscript by Nazi code breaker Alan Turing sells for $1 million

    April 13, 2015 | 1:00 pm

    A 56-page handwritten notebook that belonged to World War II Nazi code breaker and computer pioneer Alan Turing, played by actor Benedict Cumberbatch in the film "The Imitation Game," sold for more than $1 million at an auction in New York, Bonhams said on Monday.

    Turing, a...

  • Urban Outfitters sells tapestry ‘eerily reminiscent’ of Holocaust garb

    February 10, 2015 | 1:18 pm

    The Anti-Defamation League is urging fashion retailer Urban Outfitters to stop selling a gray-and-white striped tapestry with pink triangles that is reminiscent of the garb that gay men were forced to wear in Nazi concentration camps.

    ADL National Director Abraham H. Foxman wrote...

  • World leaders join last survivors in recalling Auschwitz

    January 27, 2015 | 9:17 am

    World leaders joined around 300 Auschwitz survivors at the site of the former Nazi death camp on Tuesday to mark 70 years since its liberation by Soviet troops, an anniversary held in the shadow of war in Ukraine and a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe.

    Tuesday's gathering in...

  • Orban acknowledges some Hungarians ‘chose evil over good’ in Holocaust

    January 26, 2015 | 10:53 am

    Prime Minister Viktor Orban overcame unease within his government to acknowledge Hungary's role in the Holocaust on Monday, saying many people in the central European country acted "shamefully" in World War II.

    Speaking at a memorial for Jewish soldiers who died defending...

  • 'Lisette’s List' walks readers through tumultuous, war-torn World War II Europe

    January 22, 2015 | 4:30 pm

    In her captivating historical novel, “Lisette’s List” (Random House), Susan Vreeland, the New York Times bestselling author of “Girl in Hyacinth Blue,” takes readers by the hand and guides them, with assured steps and astute historical knowledge, through the tumultuous, war-torn,...

  • Bombing the death camps during World War II

    January 21, 2015 | 4:17 pm

    Every decade, someone indignantly tells us that the United States and Britain should have bombed the rail lines at Auschwitz and other death camps during World War II. They imagine modern GPS-guided bombs that are accurate enough to enter a window. They think World War II bombs had...

  • Nous Sommes Charlie

    By Rob Eshman

    January 15, 2015 | 11:42 am

    In 2008, I had a chance to make a statement in defense of satire, and I passed.

    This was when some Muslim leaders issued a fatwa against Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten for 12 cartoons it published in 2005 depicting the prophet Muhammad. To say many Muslims found those cartoons...

  • Paris Grand Synagogue closed on Shabbat for first time since WWII

    January 9, 2015 | 4:46 pm

    The Grand Synagogue of Paris was closed during Friday’s terror attacks and did not reopen for Shabbat services, marking the first time the synagogue has not held services since World War II.

    The synagogue was closed by French police during the hostage standoff at the Hyper Cache...

  • A World War II Veteran’s Story

    By Ellie Kahn, Oral Historian

    November 11, 2014 | 10:36 am

    Many of my oral history interviews are with people who served in World War II.  Their stories are always educational, moving and inspiring.  The following is from my interview with Mark Levy, who passed away in February of this year. For those who knew Mark, it would be no surprise...

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