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Tag: Treatment

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  • Syrian treated by IDF soldiers dies in Israeli hospital

    March 27, 2013 | 1:47 pm

    An injured Syrian treated by Israeli soldiers on the Golan Heights border died in an Israeli hospital.

    The dead Syrian was one of seven treated on the border Wednesday morning, Israel's Channel 10 reported. Two were taken to an Israeli hospital. The rest were repatriated to Syria...

  • Sober seders spreading

    March 21, 2013 | 2:24 am

    It’s rare that an Orthodox rabbi chooses to omit an important Jewish ritual in his holiday celebrations.

    But in the spring of 2000, Rabbi Yosef Lipsker cleared his living room of furniture, set up three large dining tables and invited dozens of people to a special seder that...

  • Peddling Drugs and Selling Sobriety

    By Beit T'shuvah

    March 13, 2013 | 1:21 pm

    By Ben Spielberg

    As I halfheartedly worked on a paper on Sunday night, an infomercial on Comedy Central piqued my interest. It was some type of advertisement for recovery. However, like most treatment centers flaunting late-night commercials, there was a catch. Turn To Help...

  • Israeli company testing insulin pill for diabetes treatment

    July 5, 2012 | 9:57 am

    Some people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes can manage their disease with diet and exercise. Others must turn to insulin injections and other medical interventions to control their blood sugar levels. But diabetes is a progressive disease — even if medication isn’t needed at...

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  • Life lessons from the trenches of cancer survival

    By Roberto Loiederman

    September 4, 2008 | 1:36 am

    On my neck there's a large, upside-down L-shaped scar. One leg of the L runs from my right shoulder blade upward to just below my right ear; the other leg takes a 90-degree turn, following the jaw line to my chin. The right side of my neck -- the inside of the L -- looks as if it's...
  • Israeli teens with Turner’s find hope and kinship in Malibu

    By Dikla Kadosh

    July 30, 2008 | 11:44 pm

    In 1992, Beverly Daley, a clinical social worker at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, took a group of adolescents with Turner syndrome to Seville, Spain. In 1998, she led a similar group trip to Lisbon, Portugal. This year Daley brought two Israeli girls with Turner's to a part of the...
  • Jewish tradition says safety trumps privacy when it comes to mental health

    By Julie G Fax

    April 26, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    The deadly rampage and paranoid ravings of Seung-Hui Cho in Virginia last week cast an uncomfortably harsh light on the issue of mental illness, particularly untreated or undiagnosed mental illness among young people.

    While Cho had some initial psychological counseling in 2005, it...
  • Tel Aviv trauma expert assists U.S. military

    By Avi Hein

    April 26, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    An Israeli professor studying the long-term effects of war on the soldiers who fight is now sharing her knowledge with United States counterparts in an attempt to provide better therapy for American servicemen and women returning home from the battlefields of Iraq.

    During the last...
  • Nation-World Briefs

    June 8, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    U.N. Asks Israel to Stop Making Nukes
    A U.N. commission recommended that Israel refrain from manufacturing any more nuclear weapons as a step to a nuclear-free Middle East. The United Nation's Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, chaired by weapons inspector Hans Blix, released...

  • Interest Increases as Deadline Nears

    By David Finnigan

    May 11, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Susie Tiffany of Beverly Hills suffers from a rare blood disorder and needs monthly infusions of blood components, which her insurance company ultimately declined to cover. She hoped the government's new prescription drug benefit would help her out because, despite her ZIP code,...

  • Orthodox Alcohol, Drug Abuse Rising

    By Chanan Tigay

    March 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Peter Gould had his last drink on Purim night seven years ago -- or, more accurately, his last drinks.

    "I drank more alcohol in a day than a human body can handle," he said, relaxing on a puffy couch in Baltimore in jeans, sneakers and a black knit kipah.

    At the time, Gould --...

  • The Circuit

    By Norma Zager

    February 23, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Cleaning Up With Care

    Long time L.A. drycleaner Barry Gershenson was named one of four national spokespersons for the FabriCare Foundation.

    Gershenson, a third-generation dry cleaning veteran has more than 40 years experience as owner of Sterling Fine Cleaning in Los Angeles. As a...

  • Home Pampering Easy as 1, 2, Ahhhhh

    By Beth Gilbert

    February 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    No one deserves a spa experience more than you do. Just picture it -- warm tubs scented with essential oils, invigorating body scrubs, refreshing botanical blend face masks smoothed on in soothing circular massaging motions and misty showers with luscious gels.

    Sound divine? You...

  • Botox Treatments Aid Stroke Survivors

    By Steve Ditlea

    February 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Until recently, significant recovery from the physical and mental losses inflicted by a stroke was thought to be limited to a matter of months following injury to the brain, using conventional physical and occupational therapy. Now patients supplementing this with novel treatments,...

  • Hearing-Loss Growth Speaks Volumes

    By Debbe Geiger

    February 2, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Catherine Strick didn't know she was losing her hearing until five years ago when she went for her first annual physical and took a routine hearing test. Now, the 44-year-old accountant readily admits she has trouble hearing, and says people are quick to notice.

    "My...

  • ‘Thin’ Exposes Hefty Secrets and Lies

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    January 12, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Alisa, a 30-year-old Jewish divorcee, consumed 200 calories most days. But every few weeks, she repeatedly binged on gargantuan amounts of junk food, then purged by vomiting, swallowing diuretics and Ipecac. After several days, the mother of two usually landed in the hospital.

    "I...

  • Steven Firestein: Making Magic for Children

    By Marc Ballon

    January 5, 2006 | 7:00 pm

     

    Steven Firestein thought he had it all. At 27, he owned a plush Encino home, drove a Cadillac and made a nice living as a real estate agent. Then he felt a bump on his scalp.

    For months, Firestein ignored the growth, fearing he had cancer. By the time he went under the...

  • Lack of One Enzyme Triggers Illness

    By Andrea Waxman

    December 1, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    Gaucher Disease is a rare, inherited disease caused by a hereditary deficiency of a single essential enzyme, glucocerebrosidase, according to the National Gaucher Foundation (NGF).

    Because this enzyme is necessary for breaking down aging blood cells, its lack causes some...

  • Many With Gaucher Unaware of Disease

    By Andrea Waxman

    December 1, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    When Jewish New Yorker Joan La Belle, now 70-something, was in her mid-20s, she began to experience scary symptoms, suggesting a serious health problem: "I felt exhausted, had rough menstrual periods with very heavy bleeding and terrible nose bleeds."

    She also suffered...

  • A Holocaust-Inspired Vegetarian

    By Noam Mohr

    June 23, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Recently, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) issued an apology for its Holocaust on Your Plate campaign and exhibit, which showed concentration camp images next to photos of animal abuse on factory farms. The comparison was extraordinarily tasteless, and widely...

  • Surgery Offers Hope to Dystonia Victims

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    June 9, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Twelve-year-old Josh Gaskin walks to the front door and shakes a visitor's hand. While this gesture would seem routine for most adolescents, two years ago it would have been impossible for Josh.

    By the time he had reached the fourth grade, Josh's dystonia caused his right hand to...

  • Briefs

    By David Finnigan

    June 2, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    PETA Apologizes for Shoah Comparison

    The animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has apologized for its eyebrow-raising, 2-year-old "Holocaust on Your Plate" campaign, with PETA's leader stating, "it was never our goal to humiliate the victims" of the...

  • Kosher Slaughtering Proves Humane

    By Rabbi Menachem Genack

    December 30, 2004 | 7:00 pm

     

    Many people expressed concern about the standards for humane treatment of animals at a kosher slaughterhouse after viewing a well-publicized video of kosher slaughter at the AgriProcessors plant in Iowa, which was released by the animal rights organization PETA.

    Any...

  • The Kindest Cut

    By Rob Eshman

    December 9, 2004 | 7:00 pm

     

    Last week for Chanukah I wrote about latkes, this week, the brisket.

    Butchered cows have provoked quite a controversy over the past two weeks. That's because the animal rights group, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), released an undercover video taken at the...

  • Kosher Slaughter Controversy Erupts

    By Peter Ephross

    December 2, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    It's not every day that people affiliated with a strident animal rights group talk turkey with those who oversee kosher slaughter.

    But that's exactly what happened this week, when an unpaid adviser to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) discussed allegations of...

  • Israeli Docs Save Third World Hearts

    By Shaanan Meyerstein

    October 7, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Inside the Mnaje Mojo hospital -- "one coconut" in Swahili -- it was absolute chaos. The place was teeming with people and I had to push my way through what seemed a never-ending crowd to get to the small room at the end of the corridor.

    When I opened the door to the pitch-black...

  • Cancer and Secrets

    By Homa Shadpour-Michaelson

    August 26, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    I have cancer. It's thyroid cancer, which has metastasized. In every bone in my body there is a tumor eating it from the inside out.

    That's why I was at the Cedars-Sinai Outpatient Cancer Center on June 25, 2003, having a bone infusion. I sat there on one of those comfortable chairs...

  • How to Be Religious in Prison

    By Gaby Wenig

    May 20, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    California state prison inmate Raymond Morrison was forced to wear paper clothes, had his personal property taken from him, spent months in "the hole" (a.k.a. administrative segregation), was denied telephone calls and family visits, all because of his adherence to a halachic tenet....

  • Plan Seeks to Cure High Cost of Drugs

    By Idan Ivri

    April 22, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    In this presidential campaign year, the figure is ubiquitous: One out of four Americans, about 70 million people, do not have health insurance. At the same time, Americans are spending about $100 billion on prescription drugs annually, more than double what was spent in 1990.

    For...

  • Coping With Cancer Proves Family Affair

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    November 27, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    In the first moments after Lori Marx-Rubiner was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, several fears ran through her head. The Jewish community social worker, who was 35 at the time, wondered about her mortality and worried about the prospect of pain and nausea induced by...

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