Jewish Journal

Tag: Shmita

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  • Worth a trek: Searching Moroccan mountains for etrogs

    3 weeks ago

    We had to cross the gorge, and the only way was to walk single file on a narrow concrete gutter, maybe a foot wide, that bridged the two cliffs. Below us was a long, perilous drop onto the rocky depths.

    I was traveling deep into the rural communities of Morocco’s Atlas Mountains,...

  • Shmita points to the Torah’s Author

    October 31, 2014 | 10:25 am

    From the medieval Kuzari to Lawrence Kelemen’s Permission to Receive to Aish HaTorah’s “Discovery Seminar,” Orthodox Jews have promoted many arguments to support the idea of the Divine origin of the Torah. Many focus on the impossibility of a Revelatory event witnessed by millions...

  • Letters to the editor: Young Americans in Israel, embracing our elders and shmita

    October 1, 2014 | 9:44 am

    Young Yisra’el?

    I recently read Rob Eshman’s article about the younger generation and their views of Israel in light of the summer’s violent events (“Young Americans and Israel,” Sept. 5). I applaud the Journal’s courage in presenting the fact that there is a range of views...

  • A new look in Israel for Shmita, the year of rest

    By  Orit Arfa

    September 24, 2014 | 11:15 am

    More than 2,000 years ago, when ancient Israel was an agrarian society, the shmita year was a huge national happening. Commencing with Rosh Hashanah, the people of Israel would gather in the fields to partake of the produce left “ownerless” by farmers who, heeding the biblical...

  • Understanding Shmita, Israel’s agricultural Shabbat

    September 9, 2014 | 3:19 pm

    When Rosh Hashanah comes later this month, Israel’s Jewish farmers won’t just be celebrating the start of a new year. They’ll be marking a year in which they are prohibited from doing their jobs.

    Called Shmita, the Torah-mandated, yearlong farming hiatus is felt across Israel,...

  • For the Kids

    By Abby Gilad

    May 6, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    In Parshat Behar the Israelites are taught about shmita (sabbatical). Every seven years, the Jews in Israel must not farm their land so that the soil may take

    a rest. So, what does this have to do with


    Mother's Day falls on May 9 and is like a once-a-year sabbatical for mothers. It is her day to rest, to not have to cook, shop or work. So give your Mom a nice Mother's Day this year. She'll appreciate that breakfast in bed so much, and will be able to return to working and caring for you with renewed energy!