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Tag: Recipes

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  • Learning Lite in Laguna

    By Andrea Adelson

    August 1, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    If food really is a cipher, unusual tales are spilling from menus devised for a two-part Jewish holiday cooking class this month at Laguna Culinary Arts.

    Mark Cleveland, a guest instructor at the year-old Laguna Beach cooking school, specializes in creating low-fat meals with...

  • The Many Layers of ‘Cake’

    By Judy Bart Kancigor

    May 23, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Journalism 101, Rule No. 1: The interview is about the interviewee, not about you. Ask a question, then shut up and listen. Obviously, the instructor never met Sharon Boorstin, who is as interested in you as you are in her. No, really. My list of questions goes out the window.

    With...

  • A ‘Cheesy’ Holiday

    By Linda Morel

    May 9, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    My father never missed a chance to eat cheesecake. He was a furniture salesman whose territory covered the New York metropolitan area, and whenever he called on stores near a bakery, he purchased a cheesecake. While my mother and brother avoided cheese in any form, he knew he could...

  • Give a Fig!

    By Janet Silver Ghent

    May 2, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    One of the most memorable dishes I enjoyed in Israel was chicken-stuffed figs in tamarind sauce, at chef Moshe Basson's Eucalyptus restaurant in Jerusalem. Tamarind concentrate is sold in blocks at Asian markets. To save time, you could use ground chicken or turkey.

    Moshe Basson's...

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  • Gramma Gene’s Gefilte Fish

    By Judy Zeidler

    March 21, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Passover is a special holiday for me and brings back many wonderful food memories. One of my favorites occurred many years ago, when I was invited to a Passover seder at the home of my husband-to-be. I still remember that evening, and especially the taste of the gefilte fish my...

  • Remembrances of Passover Food Past

    By Linda Morel

    March 21, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Ruth Reichl, Gourmet magazine's editor in chief, reminisced about the versatility of matzah brie in her memoir, "Tender at the Bone."

    Likewise, Elizabeth Ehrlich wrote of her longing for the salty gefilte fish of her childhood, comparing it to her mother-in-law's sweeter variety in...

  • New Cookbooks Stir Up Passover Delicacies

    By Rahel Musleah

    March 14, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Whether you are looking for a memorable seder gift, new recipes for Passover or a break from cleaning to salivate over what you might but will probably never prepare, enjoy sifting through this refreshing and unusual batch of recently published kosher cookbooks and books that feature...

  • One People, Two Cuisines

    By Beverly Levitt

    March 14, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Because my ancestors were from Eastern Europe, specifically Latvia, Lithuania and Vilna, I am Ashkenazi. Just as I thought all Jews spoke Yiddish, a language I delight in because it's so colorful, I grew up thinking Jewish cooking was my mother's brisket and carrot tzimmes, my Granny...

  • Deep Fry Diversity

    By Matthew Goodman

    December 13, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    The historical foundations of Chanukah are well documented, in the Apocrypha's First and Second Books of the Maccabees and "The Jewish War" and "Jewish Antiquities," written by the Jewish historian, Josephus, in the first century of the common era. As these sources relate, in the...

  • Chanukah in Casablanca

    By Michel Ohayon

    December 6, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    We realized that Chanukah was coming when we smelled the aromas from the bakeries in the Jewish Quarter of the city, where we all lived. In Morocco we didn't have expensive menorahs, because it was illegal to import them from Israel. Instead, every year just before Chanukah, the...

  • Olive Oil Treats

    By Judy Zeidler

    December 6, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    Chanukah is a time to recall the miracle that occurred more than 2,000 years ago when the flame in the Holy Temple was relit with a one-day supply of oil that lasted for eight days. This was the amount of time needed to prepare pure oil from the local olive trees to rekindle the...

  • Holiday Heroine

    By Linda Morel

    November 29, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    Each year, Jews light Chanukah candles for eight evenings in a row, repeating the story of the Maccabees, the ancient guerrilla warriors who launched surprise attacks on the occupying armies of Syria.

    Judah the Maccabee and his four brothers overthrew Syrian tyranny, restored the...

  • Taking the Schmaltz Out of Our Food

    By Beverly Levitt

    September 13, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    At sundown on Monday we usher in the happiest day of our calendar, Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year. For the next 10 days we'll be called upon to reexamine our lives -- to wake up and not only smell the roses, but plant them for other people to enjoy.

    The Days of Awe end at sundown...

  • Cooking Corner

    May 24, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    Q: Why do we all love Shavuot?

    A: It's the cheese!

    Bella Greenfield's Rugelach

    I loved my mother's cheesecake and blintzes. But, most of all, I loved her rugelach. Here is the recipe for you to make with the help of an adult:

    Dough

    1 cup cream cheese

    1 cup butter

    2 cups flour

    Pinch...

  • Cheese Blintzes for Shavuot

    By Judy Zeidler

    May 24, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    Shavuot celebrates the receiving of the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai and brings with it centuries of food traditions. It is the time when dairy foods are traditionally served, and cheese blintzes are one of the most popular dishes of the holiday.

    I may not serve blintzes during...

  • Cooking with Chocolate

    By Judy Zeidler

    April 5, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    I absolutely love preparing chocolate desserts for Passover, and now that chocolate is considered a health food, it will give you all the more reason to include it in your Passover recipes. Chocolate desserts are easy to make, and you can create a variety of non-dairy chocolate...

  • From Kataif to Kasha

    By Rob Eshman

    March 22, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    "The Foods of Israel Today" by Joan Nathan (Knopf, $40)

    Joan Nathan is one of America's premier food journalists, which is what makes "The Foods of Israel Today" so important a book. It has recipes, 300-plus, and pretty pictures of food, but it is no plain cookbook. What it...

  • The Tastes of Purim

    By Nili Goldstein

    March 8, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    When breaking the Fast of Esther on the night before Purim, two Middle Eastern Jewish cultures offer particularly interesting entrees. Moroccans begin with Bar-ku-kas, a hot dairy cereal made from couscous, while a Yemeni's first taste is Zome or Zome F'tute, also a hot dairy...

  • A Thousand Recipes (But Who’s Counting?)

    By Florence Fabricant

    November 23, 2000 | 7:00 pm

    It's not a stretch to call Woodland Hills-based author Faye Levy's 625-page "1,000 Jewish Recipes" a culinary bible. It may be the only Jewish cookbook you'll ever need.

    It begins with recipes for the Jewish holidays, starting, oddly enough, with Passover instead of Rosh Hashana....

  • Rosh Hashanah Remembered

    By Beverly Levitt

    September 7, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    When I was a child, too young to understand the difference between the Days of Awe and the Day of Atonement, my only clue that the High Holidays were coming were the religious smells wafting out of our kitchen.

    My parents were first-generation American, their parents born and raised...

  • Perfect Apple-Honey Tarts for Rosh Hashanah

    By Judy Zeidler

    September 7, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a happy holiday, full of hope and optimism.The traditional foods - apples, honey, pomegranates and the traditional round challah - all have a special meaning. Both at home and in the synagogue, hopes are expressed for a "sweet" new year, which...

  • The Sephardic Diet

    By Rob Eshman

    January 27, 2000 | 7:00 pm

    Let's review. In the '70s there was the eat-only-grapefruit diet. In the '80s, I knew a woman who followed the eat-all-the-blueberries-you want diet. "They have no calories!" she enthused. "You can eat as many as you want!" Then the cavities and fainting spells kicked in. In the...
  • Granny’s Chanukah

    By Beverly Levitt

    November 25, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    I can still see my Granny, an apron protecting her good dress, her clunky lace-ups (the original granny shoes) planted firmly on her linoleum floor, grating potatoes, onions and crying. "I'm not crying 'cause I'm sad," she'd sniff, waving the onion fumes from her face. "We're going...
  • Back in Thyme

    By Rob Eshman

    October 9, 1997 | 8:00 pm

    Israel's newest weapon in its battle for economic well-being andworldwide acceptance is a tall, thin New Yorker with a great lambrecipe.

    Her name is Rozanne Gold. New Yorkers know Gold because, whilestill in her 20s, she served as the personal chef for the city's thenmayor, Ed Koch....

  • Challah-palooza

    By Rob Eshman

    September 18, 1997 | 8:00 pm

    Challah-palooza

    The usual braided bread gives way to domed crowns ofgolden dough, studded with raisins

    By Robert Eshman, Associate Editor

    I was the kind of kid who rushed out to buy round corn chips andorange Gatorade and square-pan pizzas. Any food with the bold word"NEW!" on...

  • The Book on Olives

    By Rob Eshman

    September 4, 1997 | 8:00 pm

    'Olives: The Life and Lore of a Noble Fruit,'

    by Mort Rosenblum (North Point Press, $25)

    In his endlessly fascinating book, "Olives: The Life and Lore of a Noble Fruit," Mort Rosenblum reminds us that domesticated olives were around before the Bible, "was a first draft scribbled on...

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