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Tag: Playwright

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  • 7 Days in the Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    December 9, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    Saturday, December 11

    Today and tomorrow only, the award-winning "Underneath the Lintel" returns to the Sacred Fools Theater Company. Playwright Glen Berger's story about a Dutch librarian who feels compelled to hunt down a man whose library book is 123 years overdue is really...

  • Partying With the Many Faces of ‘Alma’

    By Tom Tugend

    September 23, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Alma Mahler-Gropius-Werfel, who married and bedded a string of the 20th century's most creative geniuses, is celebrating her 125th birthday -- and what a party it's going to be.

    For the occasion, guests, after running a paparazzi gantlet and imbibing a welcoming drink, will meet not...

  • A Bite Out

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 23, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Playwright Leon Martell was dining at Canter's when his thoughts drifted to Billy Gray, the Jewish comic whose name had graced a 1950s nightclub on Fairfax.

    Billy Gray's Band Box had been a sexy, Hollywood gangsterland kind of joint where stars like Lou Costello had schmoozed with...

  • Playwright’s Alter Ego Returns Home

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 9, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    For Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies, "Brooklyn Boy" represents both a return and a departure.

    Like several of his early plays, the drama explores obsessions culled from his Brooklyn boyhood: "The legacies parents instill in their children, the continuity of...

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  • Odets Revival Hits Venice, Long Beach

    By Tom Tugend

    June 24, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Clifford Odets burst onto Broadway in 1935, when three plays by the 29-year-old actor-writer -- "Waiting for Lefty," "Awake and Sing" and "Paradise Lost" -- opened in the same year.

    Odets, the son of Jewish immigrants, was an early member of the fabled Group Theatre in New York,...

  • Screen Scribe

    By Tom Tugend

    May 13, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Norman Hudis is a patient man, not by temperament but by necessity. It took the ex-Londoner and current Woodland Hills resident some 30 years to see his play produced on stage, and if the venue is Santa Ana rather than Manhattan, he is as pleased as any playwright savoring his name...

  • A Writer’s Road

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    April 1, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    "I don't ever read reviews," playwright Jessica Goldberg said. "I'm too sensitive ... I'd rather not know."

    The revelation is surprising, considering that the soft-spoken Jewish dramatist hasn't had so many bad reviews. Her edgy yet entertaining work has often earned kudos since one...

  • Curtain to Rise on Women’s Conflicts

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 26, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    In a rehearsal room at the Odyssey Theatre, Colette Freedman propped her electric-blue high tops on a chair and good naturedly laughed at herself. "I'm truly flawed," the 30-ish actress-playwright said. "I am totally a hypocrite."

    Well, not totally. While her "Deconstructing the...

  • ‘House’ of Oscar Fever

    By Tom Tugend

    January 29, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    Jewish talent and themes scored only modestly in the Oscar nominations announced Tuesday.

    However, there was recognition for the critically acclaimed "House of Sand and Fog" by Vadim Perelman, a 39-year old native of Kiev, in his first feature film.

    Although Perelman did not make the...

  • Lovin’ the

    By David Finnigan

    December 11, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    For playwright Miriam Hoffman, Yiddish is hardly a dying language. "It just doesn't want to die," said Hoffman, who will teach Yiddish at the Dec. 14-20 intensive language/culture immersion courses at UCLA and the University of Judaism.

    "Yiddish was always a problem since its...

  • Hitler’s Conductor: Man or Monster?

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 18, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    On opening night of Ronald Harwood's "Taking Sides," revolving around Hitler's favorite conductor, viewers accosted the playwright. A woman said, 'How could you do this to such a great artist?'" Harwood recalled. "Then a man grabbed me and said, 'Wilhelm Furtwängler was an absolute...

  • Love in the Afterlife

    By Tom Tugend

    February 13, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Neil Simon has always laced his plays with aspects of his own life and, at age 75, he takes on mortality -- specifically the mortality of a creative writer -- in "Rose and Walsh."

    In the world premiere of his 33rd play, now at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood, Simon examines death,...

  • Playing at Pollard

    By Keren Engelberg

    February 6, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Playwright Martin Blank confesses he has an affinity for spy stories. It was this attraction that drew him to a book about great American espionage cases a few years ago -- and to the story of Jonathan Pollard, an American Jew who received a life sentence in 1987 for passing...

  • Wendy Wasserstein to Give a Little Peek

    By Andrea Adelson

    January 2, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Fertility therapy, Jewish identity, pressure to marry, single parenting. All are themes that flow through both the personal life and creative work of playwright Wendy Wasserstein, who won a Pulitzer Prize and Tony in 1998 for "The Heidi Chronicles."

    In a rare peek behind the...

  • 7 Days in the Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    October 24, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    27/SUNDAY

    The Olmert family name makes headlines again this week as a play, written by the with of the mayor of Jerusalem, makes its Los Angeles premiere. "Fantasy for Piano," written by Aliza Olmert, debuts as part of the Celebrity Staged Reading series. Alexandra More directs a...

  • 7 Days In Arts

    September 12, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Saturday



    First the House Un-American Activities Committee and then the fall of the U.S.S.R. Apparently, it's not easy being red. "Fellow Traveler" is playwright John Herman Shaner's take on this struggle. His main character is Arnold Priest, a communist TV writer played by Harold...

  • Homecoming From Hell

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 5, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    One day during his junior year abroad in Vienna in 1978, Jon Marans told a professor of his intention to visit the concentration camp Dachau. Her response stunned him. "She said, 'Why do you want to go there for? It's just a bunch of dead Jews,'" recalls the Pulitzer-nominated...

  • Homecoming From Hell

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 5, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    One day during his junior year abroad in Vienna in 1978, Jon Marans told a professor of his intention to visit the concentration camp Dachau. Her response stunned him. "She said, 'Why do you want to go there for? It's just a bunch of dead Jews,'" recalled the Pulitzer-nominated...

  • ‘Letters’ From the Heart

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    June 6, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Alan Rosenberg and Marg Helgenberger know playwright A.R. Gurney is perhaps the quintessential chronicler of WASP American life. So why are the Jewish actor and his lapsed Catholic TV-star wife performing Gurney's "Love Letters" June 9 at the Skirball Cultural Center to benefit West...

  • Who Exploits Whom?

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    August 30, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    "Hold Please" began when playwright Annie Weisman had some politically incorrect thoughts about the Clinton-Lewinsky affair.

    The writer believed that Monica Lewinsky virtually blackmailed Bill Clinton into finding her a job. "It's important to set standards to protect the powerless...

  • Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    August 30, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    When Marc Wolf set out to interview gay and lesbian military personnel for his Obie-winning play, "Another American: Asking & Telling," in 1996, secrecy was crucial.

    Three years into President Clinton's controversial "don't ask, don't tell" policy, paranoia among gays in the military...

  • Eliot "E.J." Safirstein

    August 23, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    Eliot "E.J." Safirstein

    Eliot "E.J." Safirstein, an award-winning playwright, died July 31 at the age of 39.

    A childhood survivor of cancer, Safirstein wrote the 1988 John Cauble Award-winning short play "Waterworks," which was performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C....

  • Goddess of ‘Shiksa’

    By Mike Levy

    June 21, 2001 | 7:59 pm

    Playwright Wendy Wasserstein went ahead and called her new essay collection "Shiksa Goddess." But not to worry, the title essay -- a spoof on discovering her Episcopalian "roots" -- and 34 others prove that Wasserstein remains the same witty Jewish cultural critic her fans have come...

  • Big Apple Confessions

    By Mike Levy

    April 12, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    With its witty observations, rapid pacing and expertly delivered one-liners, "The Pages of My Diary I'd Rather Not Read" is a great evening of theater for its humor alone. What makes Eydie Faye's debut as a playwright special, however, is its trio of strong characters.

    At the...

  • ‘Gathering’

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 1, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    Playwright Arje Shaw's first memory was crawling across the floor, finding a piece of black, moldy bread and dipping the crust in water in order to chew it. He was 18 months old. "I looked like a Biafran baby," he says.



    The time was World War II, the place Tashkent, Uzbekistan,...

  • Cameo of a Playwright

    By Tom Tugend

    January 25, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    Israeli filmmaker Amos Gitai will direct a novice actor in his next movie. He is playwright Arthur Miller, better known as the author of "Death of a Salesman," "The Crucible" and numerous other dramas.



    The title of the movie is "Plain Jane" and Miller will be familiar with the...

  • Coming Full Circle

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    April 6, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    Before Robbie Baitz was Jon Robin Baitz, the playwright, he was, in his words, "a smart-ass little spoiled Beverly Hills snot" who worked as a gofer for a couple of Hollywood con artists. Rather than sensibly going East to college, he had elected to remain in Los Angeles to glean...
  • Jewish Themes at Sundance

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 3, 2000 | 7:00 pm

    The Sundance Film Festival, that two-week industry schmooze-fest in Park City, Utah, was once more a launching pad for Jewish independent cinema.

    British playwright David Hare arrived for the world premiere of "Via Dolorosa," the filmed version of his acclaimed monologue about life in...

  • Judgment of Herbert Bierhoff

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 9, 1999 | 8:00 pm

    The nightmares have plagued Dr. Sigi Ziering since the Holocaust.

    "Of all the many memories of friends and family that I [have] carried with me for over 50 years, the fate of the Bierhoff family... [has] caused me the most sleepless nights," Ziering says, through a character in his...

  • A Brecht Debut and Finale

    By Tom Tugend

    June 24, 1999 | 8:00 pm

    In an ironic twist that Bertolt Brecht would have appreciated, his legendary Berliner Ensemble will make its American debut at UCLA July 7 to 11, and then lower the curtain permanently.

    Brecht founded the ensemble in East Berlin in 1949 to direct and present the playwright's own...

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