Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Tag: Novelist

View the most popular tags overall?

  • Novelist A.B. Yehoshua raises the question: Can Jewishness be shed?

    November 26, 2008 | 4:21 pm

    A.B. Yehoshua, long recognized as one of Israel's best novelists, has in recent years also emerged as one of its most prominent scolds. On Tisha B'Av this year, he published an op-ed in the Guardian deploring the "moral deterioration" of Israel's public life. Contrasting...
  • Brad A. Greenberg interviews author Michael Chabon

    By Brad A. Greenberg

    December 14, 2007 | 9:49 pm

    The Jewish Journal’s senior writer, Brad A. Greenberg, asks Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon about his “frozen chosen” hit “The Yiddish Policemen’s Union,” about being called an anti-Semite and about being comfortable as a geek.

  • On the tricky question of ‘who is a Jew[ish writer]?’

    By David Wolpe

    November 8, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    I do not know who qualifies as a Jewish writer.

    If you wish to count the non-Jewish John Updike because he created a Jewish protagonist (Henry Bech) or if you include genetically Jewish Muriel Spark (who converted to Catholicism and wouldn't know a box of tefillin or a bag of...

  • Adventures of Tom & Chabon

    By Tom Teicholz

    November 8, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    Novelist Michael Chabon has an agent, Steven Barclay, who handles his speaking engagements and who scheduled my interview with Chabon for 8:15 a.m. on the morning of Halloween. When I asked Barclay what self-respecting writer does interviews at 8:15 a.m., he said: "A very busy one."...
  • ADVERTISEMENT
    PUT YOUR AD HERE
  • Books: Brits behaving badly

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    November 1, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    "When We Were Bad" by Charlotte Mendelson (Houghton Mifflin, $24).

    As a wedding is about to begin in North London, all eyes are on the mother of the groom. Claudia Rubin is tall, beautiful, brainy and voluptuous, a celebrated rabbi who leads a large congregation. She's not...

  • UJ’s Levy crafts confab to celebrate authors

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 1, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Considering that he's an educator, whose job description is heading up a university adult-ed program, you might not expect Gady Levy to be so ... well-connected. Yet here he is in his office at American Jewish University (formerly the University of Judaism), looking more the...
  • A ‘Victory Garden’ grows (in Brooklyn) from writer’s fertile mind

    By Robert David Jaffee

    October 25, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    "The Victory Gardens of Brooklyn" by Merrill Joan Gerber (Syracuse Univ. Press, 406 pages, $24.95)
    In the living room of novelist Merrill Joan Gerber's home in Sierra Madre is a harpsichord that is most often played by her husband, a retired Pasadena City College history professor....
  • Literary paprika

    By Tom Teicholz

    January 25, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    What better way to start the New Year than by sprinkling a little literary paprika?

    Consider this: Mark Sarvas, a New York-born son of Hungarian parents, a voracious reader, a Francophile and a foodie, comes to Los Angeles to be a writer, sells some screenplays and starts an...

  • Writer spins thrillers from his own undercover adventures

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    November 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Jet lag launched Haggai Carmon into his career as an author. The international lawyer found himself in a small, unheated hotel room in a remote country he won't identify. He was on U.S. government assignment, collecting intelligence on a violent criminal organization, but his...
  • Israeli author Grossman exhorts Olmert to follow Rabin’s example

    By Jacob Berkman

    November 9, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    He has long been known abroad as an Israeli novelist. But this weekend, David Grossman put fiction aside to become the voice of an Israel that is bruised, confused and yearning to see the horizon beyond the perennial war clouds.

    Grossman delivered the central address at Saturday...

  • Hungarian Novelist Takes Manhattan

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    December 9, 2004 | 7:00 pm

     

    When Imre Kertesz was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 2002, few Americans had read the work of the Hungarian novelist, the first survivor of the concentration camps to be awarded the literary prize. Even in his own country, his works were not well known; his subject,...

  • Leon Uris, Author of ‘Exodus,’ Dies at 78

    By Christopher Lehmann-Haupt

    June 26, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    Leon Uris, the novelist and screenwriter whose best-known works are "Exodus," a popular novel about Jews trying to establish modern Israel, and "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral," perhaps the archetypal Hollywood Western, died June 21 at his home on Shelter Island, N.Y. He was 78.

    The...

  • ‘Image’ Is Everything

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 13, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Dara Horn wrote an exuberant scene in her stunning debut novel, "In the Image," upon returning to her dreary garret flat during a year abroad in 1999. "I'd been to this dismal British market in which an entire aisle was devoted to butter and fats," the ebullient Horn, 25, said...

  • His Name Was Chaim Potok

    By Peter Ephross

    July 25, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Chaim Potok was a novelist who paved the way for a younger generation of religious American Jewish writers -- and a Jewish scholar who worked tirelessly to bring Jews and Judaism closer together.

    Potok, who was raised in an Orthodox home, but later became a Conservative rabbi, died...

  • The Diminished Assault on Truth and Memory

    By Michael Berenbaum

    April 20, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    In the wake of the Littleton shooting tragedy, a nation of finger-pointers has rounded up the usual suspects: media violence, guns, video games, the Internet. But for Jonathan Kellerman, this laundry list -- inevitably brought out in the wake of such violence -- omits one major...
  • Reflections on Joseph Heller

    By Sanford Pinsker

    December 16, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    When you write a book-length study of a living author lots of things can happen; most of them are bad.

    "You've missed a nuance here, a shading there," some will point out, in the iciest language possible, while others go straight to the jugular and angrily insist that you don't know...