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Tag: Novel

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  • The Settler Is Free….

    By Orit Arfa

    July 10, 2013 | 11:08 am

    This is a hugely emotional moment for me. This is the moment I let my baby run free into the world. By "baby," I mean my debut novel, The Settler.

    Those who have followed my musings about Israel throughout the years might know that I have been obsessed with the aftermath of...

  • Segal’s debut novel, ‘The Innocents,’ wins $100,000 Rohr Prize

    May 29, 2013 | 4:37 pm

    Francesca Segal’s debut novel, “The Innocents,” won the $100,000 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature in fiction.

    The novel, which the U.K. Guardian described as “part ambiguous morality tale, part guidebook on north London Jewish community culture,” already had won the 2012...

  • What would my Israeli grandmother think?

    By Rebecca Spence

    May 17, 2013 | 11:06 am

    When I hear about the latest events in Israel – the air strikes on weapons facilities in Syria, the flare-ups over women donning prayer shawls at the Western Wall – I can’t help but wonder: What would my Israeli grandmother think?

    After all, she spent her young life fighting for...

  • Leonard’s story

    By Gina Nahai

    October 3, 2012 | 2:24 pm

    Years ago, I created a class, “Writer’s Marketplace,” dedicated to the business side of writing. It was inspired by all the I-wish-I’d-known-then-what-I-know-now moments in my own career, the realization that good writers often are clueless about how to sell their work, and that...

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  • ‘The Exorcist’ at the Geffen: No green vomit, but plenty of evil

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    June 27, 2012 | 3:19 pm

    William Peter Blatty was a Georgetown University student in August 1949 when he came across a front-page story in the Washington Post titled “Priest Frees Mt. Rainier Boy Reported Held in Devil’s Grip.” Blatty, a devout Catholic, was fascinated by the accounts of the...

  • Joyce fans celebrate Bloomsday in Westwood

    June 19, 2012 | 12:50 pm

    More than 100 James Joyce enthusiasts, performance artists and Irish descendants gathered at Westwood’s Hammer Museum on June 16 to celebrate Bloomsday. Taken from the name of Leopold Bloom, the assimilated Jewish protagonist in Joyce’s monumental book, “Ulysses,” the event...

  • Himmler’s brain

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 6, 2012 | 11:38 am

    Not long ago, I reviewed Peter Longerich’s benchmark biography of Heinrich Himmler in these pages—a work of meticulous and compelling scholarship about the master architect of the Final Solution, a mostly ordinary human being whose claim on history is that he succeeded in putting...

  • Author Anthony Horowitz to write new Sherlock Holmes novel

    January 18, 2011 | 2:27 pm

    Jewish author Anthony Horowitz has been commissioned by the estate of Arthur Conan Doyle to write a full-length Sherlock Holmes novel.

    Horowitz, author of the popular young adult series about teenage spy Alex Rider, told The Guardian Tuesday that he set about writing “a first-rate...

  • Books: It’s mom vs. daughter in Weiner’s latest novel

    By Danielle Berrin

    May 8, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    What bestselling author Jennifer Weiner remembers most about her bat mitzvah is her hair.

    "It was really unfortunate hair, really tragic -- like short and feathered and awful," said Weiner, author of "In Her Shoes," which was adapted as a 2005 film starring Cameron Diaz and Toni...

  • Books: Leaving Russia behind—somewhat

    By Amy Klein

    April 24, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    When Perestroika came in 1985, anti-Jewish feeling in Russia became even more overt than it had been during the Soviet era.

    There were flyers announcing threats to burn down Jews' homes, and one night, on national TV, a nationalist leader announced they were planning a massive...

  • Books: Pot-smoking antihero proves cathartic for her creator

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    March 13, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    Twenty-nine-year-old Dahlia Finger, the antihero of Elisa Albert's debut novel, "The Book of Dahlia," has an inoperable brain tumor and an attitude.

    Before her diagnosis, Dahlia spent her days smoking pot, watching cheesy movies and eating toaster pastries in the Venice, Calif.,...

  • Books: The end of many things, but not of the Jews

    By Amy Klein

    February 28, 2008 | 5:00 pm

    "The End of the Jews: A Novel," by Adam Mansbach (Spiegel & Grau, $23.95).

    Adam Mansbach was at a "garish" family bar mitzvah with his grandfather some years back when somewhere between the bad '80s music and kitschy dance floor games, his grandfather turned to him and said...

  • Rabbi’s novel idea draws inspiration from geniza

    By Amy Klein

    February 21, 2008 | 5:00 pm

    Some people cap a career by writing a memoir or an exhaustive magnum opus based on a lifetime of research.

    But after eight books and 30 years at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York as rabbi and professor, Burton L. Visotzky decided to write a novel. A work of Jewish...

  • Adventures of Tom & Chabon

    By Tom Teicholz

    November 8, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    Novelist Michael Chabon has an agent, Steven Barclay, who handles his speaking engagements and who scheduled my interview with Chabon for 8:15 a.m. on the morning of Halloween. When I asked Barclay what self-respecting writer does interviews at 8:15 a.m., he said: "A very busy one."...
  • Books to remember this summer by

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    August 16, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Our summers have markers, memories that trigger a specific time: The summer of the walk on the moon, Hurricane Bob or the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles; personal events like a high school prom, a kitchen renovation or a houseguest who long overstays.

    "It was that...

  • Want to hear a story?

    By Gina Nahai

    August 2, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    So I'm at the Jewish Book Council's (JBC) open auditions, in the main sanctuary of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Manhattan, in the front row of the L-Z section of authors who have written a book with a Jewish theme and who would like to sell more than three...
  • Books: Max Apple is a bard of the background

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    January 17, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    Max Apple's people are the folks you might see having lunch at a local diner. There's Sidney Goodman, the carwash king of Las Vegas, and Jerome Feldman, the outgoing president of the Ohio Association of Independent Pharmacists, along with others who sell scrap metal, industrial...
  • A Different Israel

    By Tom Teicholz

    November 2, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    When Israel is discussed these days, more often than not it is in terms of an existential crisis, or "the situation," or as the subject of international news headlines. However, reading recently published works by three different Israeli fiction authors, Etgar Keret, Benjamin Tammuz...
  • So many authors, so little time

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 14, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Chick lit, pulp comics, historical fiction, gumshoe action and a dash of Los Angeles noir.
     
    Add celebrities such as Jackie Collins and Tommy Chong and you begin -- just barely -- to get a taste of the eclectic stew that will be the fifth annual West Hollwood Book Fair, Sept. 17,...
  • Michael Tolkin takes on L.A. excess, family dysfunction and private-school politics in sequel to his

    By Tom Teicholz

    September 14, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    The fall season is upon us, with new books, movies and TV programs all vying for our attention as palliatives to the news of war, terrorism and melting ice caps. Even as the days get shorter and our own day of judgment looms imminent, we wonder: Is there a hero out there who can set...
  • Q & A With Russian Jewish Author Gary Shteyngart

    By Harry Wiland

    September 7, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Gary Shteyngart is a literary clown with a frown. His biting satire comments on a multi-cultural America in need of self-examination and reassessment.

    "Absurdistan" (Random House, $24.95), his extraordinary new novel, takes us on a no-holds-barred journey from post-communist Russia...

  • Spectator - ‘Devil’ Is in the Details

    By Melanie Herschorn

    June 29, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    The film adaptation of Lauren Weisberger's 2003 New York Times best-selling novel, "The Devil Wears Prada," which hits theaters on June 30, follows recent college grad Andy Sachs (Anne Hathaway) as she takes on the dubious job of assistant to the editor-in-chief of the most prominent...

  • Class Notes

    By Julie G Fax

    June 22, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    New Yeshiva Flying SCY High
    Founding board members of the new Southern California Yeshiva High School (SCY High) for boys in La Jolla knew that with a history of failed yeshiva high schools in the area, they had to offer the community something new and innovative. So they, along with...

  • Treasury Mainstreams Dramatic Plights

    By Ethan Kanfer

    May 11, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Published plays -- especially those in anthologies -- tend to be dismissed by the casual browser as specialty items, of interest only to students of theater history or to actors in search of audition material. Ellen Schiff and Michael Posnick clearly had something else in mind when...

  • Rushdie’s ‘Clown’ No Laughing Matter

    By Gina Nahai

    April 27, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    "Shalimar the Clown : A Novel," by Salman Rushdie (Random House, 2005).

    Salman Rushdie is at Disney Hall, addressing a near-capacity audience as part of the Music Center's 2006 Speaker Series. He has come this March 1 evening to talk about politics and art, truth and...

  • N for No-Nonsense Natalie

    By Amy Longsdorf

    March 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Natalie Portman has probably populated more fanboy fantasies than anyone this side of Jessica Alba.

    Besides presiding over the recent "Star Wars" films as Queen Amidala, she plays a bald, beautiful and badass revolutionary in "V For Vendetta," opening March 17, the latest film from...

  • Scholar Discovers Hidden Russian Gem

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    December 1, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    "The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa" by Vladimir Jabotinsky; translated by Michael Katz (Cornell University Press, $17.95).

    A passing reference in Ruth Wisse's "The Modern Jewish Canon; A Journey Through Language and Culture" (Free Press, 2000) led to the...

  • Why a Novel?

    By Alan Zweibel

    November 24, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    "The Other Shulman" by Alan Zweibel (Villard, $23.95).

    I write. This is what I do. I'm a professional comedy writer. My job is to sit in a room with my vocabulary, select words and put them in an order that will not only hold your interest but also, hopefully, make you laugh. It's...

  • Wiesenthal Larger Than Life on Screen

    By Robert David Jaffee

    October 6, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Simon Wiesenthal, whose dogged persistence led to the capture of approximately 1,100 accused Nazi war criminals, was the quintessential larger-than-life figure filmmakers crave. While there were some less-than-distinguished films made about him over the years, they were outweighed by...

  • Like Some ‘Guilt’ With Your Chick Lit?

    By Susan Josephs

    September 8, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    "The Modern Jewish Girl's Guide to Guilt" edited by Ruth Andrew Ellenson (Dutton, $24.95).

    When Ruth Andrew Ellenson achieved the writer's milestone of selling her first book, her father responded in classic Jewish parental fashion.

    "He was thrilled and said, 'Honey, that's...

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