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Tag: Filmmaker

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  • Paul Mazursky, filmmaker, 84

    By  Tom Tugend

    July 9, 2014 | 9:08 am

    Filmmaker Paul Mazursky, 84, whose perceptive social satires explored the nascent sexual revolution of the 1960s and ’70s and created complex Jewish characters, died June 30 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of pulmonary cardiac arrest.

    In his 17 films, released between the late...

  • Director of anti-Muslim movie that sparked attacks on U.S. facilities not Israeli

    September 12, 2012 | 2:58 pm

    The director of an anti-Islam film that helped sparked attacks on U.S. diplomatic facilities is not Israeli as he claimed, a consultant to the film said.

    The Atlantic blogger Jeffrey Goldberg reported that a Steve Klein, a consultant to the controversial film, “Innocence of...

  • U.S. envoy to Libya killed over anti-Muslim movie

    September 12, 2012 | 7:38 am

    The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other American diplomats were killed, and the U.S. embassy in Cairo was attacked over an anti-Muslim movie.

    Amb. John Christopher Stevens and three unnamed diplomats were killed Tuesday night in a rocket attack on their car in Benghazi, the...

  • Henry Jaglom’s ‘45 Minutes from Broadway’

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    August 27, 2012 | 11:01 pm

    Henry Jaglom’s 18th film, “Just 45 Minutes From Broadway,” revolves around an eccentric family of actors with roots going back to the Yiddish theater, spotlighting one spring in their ramshackle country house outside New York City.  There’s the patriarch, George “Grisha”...

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  • Craig Zobel’s ‘Compliance’ and the Holocaust-inspired Milgram Experiment [VIDEO]

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    August 15, 2012 | 3:26 pm

    Craig Zobel’s controversial new film “Compliance” revolves around a prank caller, impersonating a policeman, who manipulates employees at a fast food restaurant into sexually assaulting a co-worker—a plot based on dozens of jaw-dropping, real incidents that have occurred...

  • First crush to midlife dating

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    July 26, 2011 | 6:08 pm

    A couple years after his Reform bar mitzvah, screenwriter Dan Fogelman devoured Philip Roth’s controversial novel “Portnoy’s Complaint.” The tome was a gift from his cousin, Ken Gordon, now the editor of the Jewish Webzine JBooks.com, “a very literary guy who was my hero...

  • Filmmaker puts JCorps in spotlight

    By Orit Arfa

    December 22, 2010 | 8:08 pm

    In 2008, Adam Irving, a filmmaker and photographer, left his doctoral program in media studies at the University of Texas to make the transition from theory to practice. He landed in Hollywood with the dream of making films, but soon after his arrival found himself feeling...

  • Reitman follows heart to quirky ‘Juno’

    By Pat Sierchio

    December 6, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    When Jason Reitman decided to become a filmmaker, he was not only following the path of his father, producer-director Ivan Reitman, but that of his heritage as well.

    "I think Jewish people are great storytellers," the 30 year-old film director said. "Celebrating our heritage and our...

  • Books: ‘Primo Levi’s Journey’ traces the path of a survivor

    By Tom Tugend

    November 1, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    "Primo Levi's Journey" defies neat categorization. It's part travelogue, part Holocaust remembrance, part philosophical reflection.

    The documentary's roots lie in the Italian Jewish writer's long journey after his liberation in January 1945, from Auschwitz to his hometown of Turin on...

  • Neil LaBute bears a heavy load

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    March 15, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    During one of many cringe-worthy moments in Neil LaBute's play, "Fat Pig," a cad chastises a co-worker for dating a plus-sized woman named Helen.

    "I don't understand you taking God's good gifts and pissing on 'em," the cad, Carter, warns his colleague, Tom.

    Tom is handsome and...

  • Red diaper babies seen anew in ‘Commune’

    By George Robinson

    November 9, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    It's not on his resume, but filmmaker Jonathan Berman is really an anthropologist. Each of his three acclaimed documentaries, "The Shvitz," "My Friend Paul" and his latest, "Commune," is an examination of a small self-selected community.

    "Oh, totally," he said when asked if he sees...

  • ‘Catch A Fire’ ignites filmmaker’s memories of anti-apartheid dad

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    October 26, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Shawn Slovo remembers how her Jewish parents, African National Congress activists, left home in the middle of the night to attend secret meetings. She recalls police regularly raiding their Johannesburg house and arresting her mother and father. All the while, she said, she resented...
  • ‘Syrian Bride’ Weds Simple Tale, History

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 17, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    The guests at this Middle Eastern wedding were more mournful than joyous. But even more troubled was the Druze bride herself. All dressed up, she was stuck at a border crossing in the dusty demilitarized zone between Israel's Golan Heights and Syria.

    It wasn't clear if she'd be...

  • ‘Protocols’ Exposes Ugly Legacy of Lies

    By Steven Rosen

    October 20, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Not long after Sept. 11, an Egyptian cab driver in New York told filmmaker Marc Levin, whose documentary "Protocols of Zion" is being released Friday in Los Angeles, the act of terrorism was caused by Jews rather than by Muslim fundamentalists.

    No Jews had died in the attack, the...

  • Spectator - The Great ‘Wall’ of Israel

    By Gaby Friedman

    September 8, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Simone Bitton's new documentary, "Wall," opens with long, meandering shots of the Israeli security fence, the great concrete and barbed-wire structure that straddles more than 450 miles of land in Israel's disputed territories.

    As the camera lingers on the wall, the disembodied...

  • Our Date With Drew’s Date

    By Amy Klein

    August 11, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    There are plenty of guys with crushes on Drew Barrymore, the actress who began as a child ingénue at age 6 in "E.T." and who captivates as an adult in sexier roles like her turn as one of "Charlie's Angels."

    There are also plenty of guys who are trying to make it in Hollywood,...

  • Woodman Returns

    By Tom Teicholz

    March 24, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    At the end of Woody Allen's "Melinda and Melinda," I sat in my seat stunned: Woody Allen had actually made a movie I liked -- a good movie that had something to say about life and literature. It felt like a long time since I'd enjoyed one of his films.

    Many years ago, when Allen...

  • 7 Days in the Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    February 17, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    Saturday, February 19

    Before "all that jazz" there was "Ragtime," Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens' description of America in the early 1900s, as well as the title of their 1998 musical. The Tony Award-winning epic follows three families – one African American, one WASP, one...

  • Religious Tensions Spark ‘Campfire’

    By Tom Tugend

    November 4, 2004 | 7:00 pm

     

    Sitting in a booth at Milky Way restaurant, Joseph Cedar, a lean young man in jeans and baseball cap, hardly looks the part of an Orthodox Jew, who is also one of Israel's most perceptive filmmakers.

    He is in town for a couple of days to talk about his latest movie,...

  • Caouette’s Journey to Hell and Back

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    October 14, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    When gay Jewish filmmaker Jonathan Caouette was a preteen in Houston, he frequented sock hops at the Baptist church near his home. Invariably, church elders warned he was destined for hellfire: "And I would tell them that I was possessed by the devil," Caouette, 31, said.

    His tart...

  • Roasting Woody Allen—Gently

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 16, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    One could call "Who Killed Woody Allen?" a "benign revenge comedy." Co-authors Tom Dunn, Dan Callahan and Brendan Connor wrote the whodunit after Allen allegedly withdrew the rights to his play, "Death," from their theater company in 2001. The playwrights say they had already rented...

  • Watch Out

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 9, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    When Bill Platt pitched his action-oriented "Darklight" TV movie two years ago, he hoped to create a new genre: "Chai-Fi."

    The 32-year-old filmmaker intended the project -- inspired by the Jewish "demoness" Lilith -- to merge his heritage with his sci-fi obsession.

    "I wondered if I...

  • 7 Days In Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    July 8, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Saturday



    Free tunes at the Skirball this afternoon, as part of their continuing "Café Z" series. This time it's the Latin jazz stylings of Angelo Metz's Brazilian Ensemble, performing for you al fresco, as you imbibe frothy coffee drinks in the shade. Noon-2 p.m. Free. 2701 N....

  • DVD Set Showcases Legendary Producer

    By Tom Tugend

    January 8, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    Over a period of 42 years, legendary producer Arthur Cohn has made only 12 films, of which half have been recognized with Academy Awards, giving the Swiss producer the highest batting average in the annals of the motion picture industry. This record has been recognized by the...

  • Meyers Writes Her Own Happy Ending

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    December 11, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    A decade ago, filmmaker Nancy Meyers became intrigued by a Hollywood friend who exclusively dated younger women.

    "They were always between 25 and 30," said Meyers, 54, who directed the Mel Gibson hit, "What Women Want." "Over the years, he went from his 40s to his 60s, but the women...

  • When a Yeshiva Bocher Loves a Hooker

    By Tom Tugend

    July 24, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    Sitting at a French Cafe in Westwood, Eitan Gorlin comes across as the very antithesis of the Hollywood self-promoter. The writer-director of "The Holy Land" has indeed kept such a low profile that, during months of inquiries, his name drew an absolute blank among Israel film mavens...

  • Director Cooks Up Anarchy in Debut

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    July 10, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    "I'm a 'Marx Brothers anarchist,'" filmmaker Jordan Susman said. "It's the sense of having a flower squirt water into the eyes of authority."

    The tone pervades his debut feature, "The Anarchist Cookbook," which revolves around a "latter-day Marx brother," Susman said. Puck Gold...

  • Stone’s ‘Persona’ Wears Out Welcome

    By Tom Tugend

    May 29, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    In the violence-ridden month of March 2002, which saw the Passover massacre at a Netanya hotel and the siege of Yasser Arafat's compound in Ramallah, filmmaker Oliver Stone traveled to Israel and the West Bank to shoot a documentary on the escalating conflict.

    The result is "Persona...

  • Minority Retort

    By Michael Aushenker

    April 30, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    A war is brewing. A minority in our midst is being actively persecuted. Society fears and loathes them. The government is using legislation to identify them and the military to hunt, contain and kill them. This is not Nazi Germany. This is America.

    If the plot of "X2: X-Men United,"...

  • From Blaxploitation to ‘Booth’

    By Michael Aushenker

    April 3, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    On Nov. 15, 2002, filmmaker Larry Cohen should have been at the multiplex, gauging opening day reaction to the film he wrote, "Phone Booth," about a man who must outwit a sniper while trapped in the eponymous telephonic cabin. But the Washington Sniper changed all that.

    No, Cohen...

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