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Jewish Journal

Tag: Exhibit

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  • Nixed Jews in Israel exhibit to open at UNESCO

    June 10, 2014 | 2:27 pm

    An exhibition on the Jewish presence in the land of Israel that had been canceled due to pressure from Arab states will open at UNESCO headquarters in Paris.

    “Book, People, Land — The 3,500-Year Relationship of the Jewish People With the Holy Land,” a joint exhibition of the...

  • Pollock’s ‘Mural’: Masterpiece or macho outburst?

    By Tom Teicholz

    April 2, 2014 | 2:02 pm

    Rarely do we see singular artworks that, even as they represent an exact moment of transition between art historical movements, are also masterpieces in their own right.  Yet that is exactly what can be seen now at the Getty Museum, which, until June 1, is showcasing abstract...

  • Aug. 3-9

    By Laura Donney

    August 1, 2013 | 10:37 am

    SUN AUG 4

    “WHAT MAKES A JEWISH MOVIE?”
     
    It’s the question on everybody’s mind — well, at least ours. Presented in association with the exhibition “Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic,” the program features Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan and Vincent Brook, media...
  • Munich 11 remembered at Budapest exhibit opening

    August 14, 2012 | 10:41 am

    One minute of silence was observed in memory of the Munich 11 during the opening of an exhibit at the Hungarian Jewish Museum in Budapest.

    The tribute to the 11 Israeli athletes killed by Palestinian terrorists at the Munich Olympics in 1972 came spontaneously at the request of an...

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  • ‘Women and War’

    By  Tom Tugend

    August 8, 2012 | 3:21 pm

    Growing up in Beverly Hills, Marissa Roth remembers her father and mother, both European refugees, as parents who repressed their emotions and personal suffering, and forbade their children to cry.

    So there is some irony, or perhaps compensation, in the title of Roth’s one-woman...

  • The truth, beauty and desire

    By Tom Teicholz

    July 11, 2012 | 12:22 pm

    Gustav Klimt is best known for his famous golden paintings, portraits of society women adorned in jewels and cloaked in gold, and for the flat two-dimensionality of his work that led many to declare it superficial and merely decorative. The Getty exhibition “Gustav Klimt: The Magic...

  • Children’s art exhibit gives expression to illness

    By Julie Gruenbaum Fax

    May 15, 2012 | 8:15 pm

    Artwork created by children with serious illnesses will be auctioned off, along with works by professional artists and celebrities, at Chai Lifeline’s “Through the Eyes of our Children” on May 21.

    Chai Lifeline West Coast provides support to 325 seriously ill children and...

  • From our house to Burton Exhibit: Why the Museum of Modern Art’s curators wanted to meet my husband

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    May 31, 2011 | 1:27 pm

    When the curators from Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) came calling two years ago, my husband, Ron Magid, had prepared for them a veritable smorgasbord of art by the gothic filmmaker Tim Burton. Among the fare sprawled across our dining room table was a pointy-eared cowl...

  • Arts in L.A. Quarterly Calendar: Cultural events through Feb. 2009

    By Dikla Kadosh and Lilly Fowler

    December 10, 2008 | 3:04 pm

    ALTTEXT

    Robert Dowd -- Pop Art Money -- See Jan.17 listing

    DECEMBER

    Fri., Dec. 12
    "Laemmle Through the Decades: 1938-2008, 70 Years in 7 Days." It must have been an extraordinarily difficult task to select only seven films to represent the rich and diverse history of the Laemmle Theatres...

  • Photographer documents life in Darfur

    By Rachel Heller

    November 26, 2008 | 3:57 pm

    "When I first got to Iridimi and saw there was nothing, I asked myself: Is this really a place where a person can live?"

    So confided one Darfuri refugee to photographer Barbara Grover, who visited the Iridimi refugee camp in Chad last year to document the lives of those displaced by...

  • Skirball photo exhibit shows Pope John Paul II’s lifetime of outreach to Jews

    By Tom Tugend

    September 17, 2008 | 10:33 pm

    A large photo in the exhibition "A Blessing to One Another: Pope John Paul II and the Jewish People" shows a smiling Elio Toaff, the chief rabbi of Rome, warmly welcoming the pontiff to Rome's Great Synagogue in 1986.

    Today, when interfaith meetings and celebrations are routine, it...

  • Arts in L.A. Quarterly Calendar: Cultural events through November 2008

    By Dikla Kadosh and Danielle Berrin

    September 11, 2008 | 3:22 am

    SEPTEMBER

    Fri., Sept. 12
    "A Blessing to One Another: Pope John Paul II and the Jewish People." Angelenos can explore the legacy of one of the Catholic Church's most beloved popes in a new Skirball Cultural Center exhibition. Through artifacts, photographs and audiovisual recordings...
  • Photo exhibition reveals challenges, dreams of teen immigrants

    By Anita K. Kantrowitz

    September 11, 2008 | 3:13 am

    Arsim Mustafa, a 14-year-old boy who immigrated with his parents from Kosovo to the United States, is leaning against a paint-spattered wall, arms loosely crossed as they rest on the oversized T-shirt he is wearing. He looks like any American teen, wearing baggy pants and high-top...
  • ‘Simple Twist of Fate’ finds meaning in artist’s work

    By Celia Soudry

    May 5, 2008 | 12:30 pm

    From the small religious village of Beit Yatir, just south of Jerusalem, to the far more secular beach city of Santa Monica, Judith Margolis made quite a journey to become Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion’s (HUC-JIR) artist-in-residence. When she accepted the...

  • The Dead Sea Scrolls . . . via La Jolla

    By Rob Eshman

    December 20, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    If you're tired of the drumbeat of negative publicity Israel has received lately -- i.e., the Israel Lobby, the headlines -- visiting the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit at the San Diego Natural History Museum is the pro-Israel equivalent of a spa vacation -- refreshing, relaxing and...
  • A step back in time to Anne Frank’s hiding place

    By Celia Soudry

    November 8, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    To experience the intense claustrophobia in which Anne Frank's family lived while hiding from the Nazis, just go to the Celebration of Books at American Jewish University this Sunday. No, not just because of the swarming crowds that will no doubt be filling the university's halls,...
  • Photography: A ‘Vanished’ Berlin through Roman Vishniac’s lens

    By Tom Tugend

    November 1, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Shortly after famed photographer Roman Vishniac died in 1990, his daughter Mara checked through his New York apartment. In the bottom drawer of a file cabinet she found a bundle of folders and envelopes labeled "Berlin."

    The discovery was a surprise to Mara and her mother, Luta....

  • Desperate times forged painter’s creative legacy

    By Tom Tugend

    April 12, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Charlotte Salomon perished in Auschwitz at the age of 26, but the astonishing legacy she left behind will be celebrated this month in an exhibition and on stage.

    In her short life, Salomon was a prolific painter, but her style and sensibility were so unique that critics still have...
  • UCLA Hillel exhibition recounts the legacy of America’s Jewish pioneers

    By Sarah Price Brown

    January 4, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    Rabbi Yaakov Horowitz wants to correct what he sees as a major misunderstanding about the history of Jews in this country.

    "There's a misconception that Jewish life in America started after World War II," he said. "But Jewish life existed more than 100 years before there even was a...

  • Life at 85: what a trip!

    By Red Lachman

    October 12, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    I was born in Chicago some 85 years ago. My home was Jewish Orthodox and consisted of my mother, her two brothers and their father, my grandfather. I specify my grandfather because, in those days, nobody ever thought of placing their old father in an old folks' home.
     
    My closest...
  • British theater group Stan’s Cafe uses piles of rice to bring statistics to life

    By Sarah Price Brown

    September 21, 2006 | 8:00 pm


     
    It's nearly impossible to comprehend very large numbers. Take the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust. How does one go about understanding the magnitude of 6 million?
     
    One way would be to visit the Skirball Cultural Center, where the British theater company, Stan's Cafe...
  • Americans fighters in Israel get overdue thank you

    By Tom Tugend

    September 14, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Grandfathers and grandmothers looked at the photos on the wall and saw themselves again as young, strapping soldiers, sailors and pilots, far from home and close to the face of history.
     
    They were the American and Canadian volunteers who had fought in Israel's War of Independence...
  • Gunter Grass Admits to SS Past

    August 17, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Gunter Grass Admits to SS Past

    Nobel Prize-winning author Gunter Grass' admission that he was an SS member has drawn both rage and defenses of the writer.

    While some say the revelation devalues his life's work, others are showing more understanding for the pressures faced by the...

  • Dalai Lama Concepts Inspire Works of 3 Jewish Artists

    By Morris Newman

    August 10, 2006 | 8:00 pm


    To paraphrase an old rye bread ad, you don't have to be Buddhist to admire his holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama, or at least that's so in the case of at least three Jewish artists, who lend their artistic voices to "The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama," an exhibition...

  • Persian Jewish Artist Finds New Freedom

    By Karmel Melamed

    August 10, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Krista Nassi's art

    She has won international art competitions, sold her works around the globe, and even had her pieces displayed in renowned galleries around the world. Yet nothing might be more gratifying for Iranian Jewish artist Krista Nassi than displaying her work for the first time in the United...

  • 7 Days in the Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    July 26, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Saturday the 29th

    The most avant-garde comics find a gorgeous forum, once again, with the release of the sixth edition of editor Sammy Harkham's anthology, "Kramer's Ergot 6." Geeks celebrate its release tonight at the Hammer Museum, which features performances by Kites and The...

  • Artists Dream in a Golden Age

    By Sarah Price Brown

    June 29, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Sam Erenberg spends most of the day, nearly every day, alone in a 1,000-square-foot box.

    "It's like a temple," the painter says of his artist's studio.

    A lonely temple, that is.

    "I'm the rabbi and congregation all in one," he says with a laugh.

    Working as an artist can be...

  • Israel Launches First Underwater Museum

    By Leora Eren Frucht

    June 15, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    It was the largest, most impressive port in the Roman Empire when it was inaugurated in 10 B.C.E. And some 2,016 years later, the ancient port of Caesarea -- along the Mediterranean coast of Israel -- was inaugurated again last month, this time as the world's first underwater museum....

  • Show Decodes Early Years of 2 Religions

    By Tom L. Freudenheim

    May 18, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Whether it's good luck or good planning, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in the Cleveland area has hit the exhibition jackpot with its current show, "Cradle of Christianity," which runs through Oct. 22. Because while the film version of "The Da Vinci Code" is generating buzz over...

  • Time to Watch and Learn at the Zimmer

    By Marc Ballon

    May 11, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Clocks and watches can do far more than simply tell time. A new exhibit at the Zimmer Children's Museum shows that when sliced, diced and deconstructed by artists and humanitarians, timepieces can edify, entertain and even inveigh against social injustice.

    "Show & Tell: The Art of...

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