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Jewish Journal

Tag: Disease

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  • Bikur cholim manners

    By Rabbi David Wolpe

    April 10, 2013 | 7:05 am

    Every disease is a social disease. When a person is diagnosed, his or her family, friends and community are involved as well. The shock moves through a widening circle, and the questions are always the same: How do we react; how should we react? Will I say the right thing; is there...

  • ‘Nightmare bacteria,’ shrugging off antibiotics, on rise in U.S.

    March 5, 2013 | 11:00 am

    "Nightmare bacteria" that have become increasingly resistant to even the strongest antibiotics infected patients in 4 percent of U.S. hospitals in the first half of 2012 and in 18 percent of specialty hospitals, public health officials said on Tuesday.

    "Our strongest antibiotics...

  • The curious consensus of Jews on abortion

    By Roger Price

    February 1, 2013 | 11:09 am

    That different Jews have disparate views is not news. What is news is when most Jews agree on a particular idea or approach. And so it is with the curious consensus of Jews on abortion.

    In mid-2012, the Public Religion Research Institute (“PRRI”) published its findings from a...

  • Opinion: Persian Tay-Sachs

    December 1, 2011 | 12:48 pm

    In the story, a young prince in an old and distant kingdom is mesmerized with salt.

    The prince loves the taste of salt on his tongue, the dryness of it on his skin. He loves the way the grains catch the light as they slip through his fingers like so many tiny pieces of glass on a...

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  • When prostate cancer scare hits close to home

    November 1, 2011 | 9:04 pm

    When Rabbi John Rosove of Temple Israel of Hollywood was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2009, he was devastated. Given a dire prognosis by his first doctor (who later turned out to have exaggerated the circumstances), he felt the weight of his own mortality for the first time.

    ...
  • Dramatic progress in in-vitro detection spurs new push for Ashkenazi Jews to do genetic disease test

    August 24, 2011 | 4:04 pm

    Susan and Brad Stillman grew concerned following their son Benjamin’s birth in September 1998. He was fussy and congested, had difficulty breastfeeding and didn’t take to the bottle.

    The parents brought him to the pediatrician and then to a hospital pediatric care unit near...

  • What’s an Expiration Date?

    By Julia Bendis

    May 27, 2011 | 1:44 pm

    The other day I had a very educational conversation with my son.  It involved those small letters and numbers that most normal people know as “Expiration Date” printed on many food items that we purchase…  To my Russian family they were known as nonsense writing that meant...

  • Angelina Jolie’s Tattoos.

    By Julia Bendis

    May 15, 2011 | 6:07 pm

    As I looked at pictures of Angelina Jolie’s tattoos, I couldn’t help but want to get some more of my own.  The longitude and latitude ink of her childrens’ bithplaces looks so neat on her arm.  But not wanting to be a copy cat, I thought of putting actual names of cities where...

  • Breast is Best - Give me a Break!

    By Julia Bendis

    May 12, 2011 | 9:37 am

    Apparently, there is a new study out that specifically links breast-fed babies with a better behavior when they are four or five years old, than those that weren’t breast-fed.  Are you kidding me?  Of course breast-feeding your child is good for them, we all know that by now.  Do...

  • Hypochondriacs are We!

    By Julia Bendis

    December 6, 2010 | 1:05 pm

    I absolutely love being Jewish, I love everything about it, the food, the culture, the faith itself.  However, the terrible thing about being Jewish is that constant feeling that there is something wrong with you.  Seriously, worry is our “thing”!  That’s just what we do, what has...

  • Roots, reality and Israel’s 60th

    By Jacob Dayan

    May 15, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    It is a proud and glorious week as Israel, her 7.2 million citizens and millions of friends around the world celebrate the 60th anniversary of Israel's birth as a modern, democratic nation.

    This week, world leaders will join us in joyful ceremonies; flags will fly, anthems will play...

  • Not your grandmother’s Alzheimer’s

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    May 8, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    Carol Kirsch relished her demanding position as a sales trainer for Kaiser Permanente in Oakland. But a couple of years ago, a good friend told Kirsch she just wasn't performing up to par. She was missing deadlines. And she'd forget meetings, so co-workers would have to come fetch...
  • Group hopes Gaucher becomes household name

    By Lorelei Laird

    November 16, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    When Michael Margolis was 4, his doctor took his parents aside and told them he had a rare disorder called Type I Gaucher Disease. The disease, which strikes Ashkenazi Jews seven times more often than the general population, is a genetic disorder that robs patients of an enzyme that...
  • First Person - My Upfsherin

    By Rabbi Anne Brener

    May 4, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    The upfsherin (hair cutting ceremony) took place on the last day of Shevat -- an auspicious time for a healing ritual. The day before Rosh Chodesh (first day of the month) is observed, in the medieval mystical practice of Yom Kippur katan (little Yom Kippur) -- a day for cleansing,...

  • Lack of One Enzyme Triggers Illness

    By Andrea Waxman

    December 1, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    Gaucher Disease is a rare, inherited disease caused by a hereditary deficiency of a single essential enzyme, glucocerebrosidase, according to the National Gaucher Foundation (NGF).

    Because this enzyme is necessary for breaking down aging blood cells, its lack causes some...

  • Many With Gaucher Unaware of Disease

    By Andrea Waxman

    December 1, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    When Jewish New Yorker Joan La Belle, now 70-something, was in her mid-20s, she began to experience scary symptoms, suggesting a serious health problem: "I felt exhausted, had rough menstrual periods with very heavy bleeding and terrible nose bleeds."

    She also suffered...

  • A Father’s Drive to Save His Daughter

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    September 15, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    George Smith hates to lose. A Harvard Business School graduate, Smith founded one of Southern California's largest, most prominent real estate investment banking firms and will receive an honorary doctorate from Tel Aviv University next week. Still, he smarts a little from a...

  • A Deadly Shortage

    By Adam Wills

    June 30, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Judah White's shoulders curl in and his eyes shut tight as he coughs violently. A look of pain flashes across his face. As his coughing slows, he looks up to the ceiling of his mother's kitchen and takes a deep breath.

    White is battling his third occurrence of Hodgkin's lymphoma, a...

  • Taking Women’s Health to Heart

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    February 24, 2005 | 7:00 pm

     

    Nancy Kearson knew she had high blood pressure, but she wasn't aware of any other health problems until a friend urged her to see a physician four years ago. That exam may have saved her life.

    Kearson, who at the time was 53 years old and working for a demanding CPA firm,...

  • Total Recall

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    January 22, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    Twice in the past couple of days, I've been in conversation and found myself grasping for a word. On both occasions, my 4-year-old supplied the word before I could come up with it. And, of course, there are the times that I walk into a room only to realize that I have no idea what I...

  • A Forkful of Trouble

    By Wendy J. Madnick

    November 21, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Turkey, potatoes and gravy, candied yams -- all the foods you love to pile on your plate come Thanksgiving. But you might want to check your blood sugar before you take another helping of mashed potatoes, because if you are one of the many American Jews at risk for diabetes, that...

  • Muscular Disorder Won’t Stop Siblings

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    November 21, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    As young adults, brothers Babak and Daniel Darvish, born less than two years apart, were avid athletes, music lovers and medical students who planned to become surgeons. But about five years ago, they discovered that they shared something besides their hobbies and professional...

  • New Hope for HIBM Cure

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    April 25, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Soroya Nazarian learned about hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM), an uncommon muscular disorder that affects the Persian Jewish community, while in Israel on a Hadassah mission about five years ago. There, she met professor Zohar Argov, from the department of neurology at the...

  • I’m a Survivor!

    By Michael Aushenker

    April 18, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Fran Drescher has a very sexy voice.

    No, really! As she tools around Los Angeles, the Queens-raised actress -- who resonated with TV audiences for six seasons as Fran Fine on "The Nanny" -- evinces only traces of her character's trademark nasal New Yawk bray.

    On this April day,...

  • Kosher Meat Less Prone to Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    By Richard Allen Greene

    March 22, 2001 | 6:59 pm

    As far as foot-and-mouth disease is concerned, it's good to be Jewish.

    Since the outbreak of the disease last month, Jews who keep kosher have faced fewer serious meat shortages than the rest of the British community.

    The economics of kosher slaughter have worked in Jews' favor.

    Most...

  • Sneak Thief

    By Michael Berlin

    January 25, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    Ten million Americans have glaucoma, though only an estimated 2 million to 4 million have been diagnosed with the often symptomless disease. During National Glaucoma Awareness Month in January, medical professionals and glaucoma patients alike urge people to have their eyes...

  • A Decrease in Vigilance

    By David Evanier

    January 25, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    A conference on genetic diseases held by the Cultural Foundation of Habib Levy in November led The Journal to examine the Jewish community's reduced state of awareness about genetic testing for prospective parents. During the past 30 years, large-scale genetic screening of Ashkenazi...

  • The Neurobiology of Teshuvah

    October 5, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    As a scientist and a believer in human progress, I have been concerned about how well the established process of teshuvah (repentance) has worked. Yom Kippur after Yom Kippur - in fact, since the 11th century - we have recited the same confessional prayer, "Al Chet." If we were any...

  • Still Stigmatized

    By Charlotte Hildebrand

    May 4, 2000 | 8:00 pm

    When Ofra Haza, the 41-year-old Israeli Yemenite singer, succumbed to complications of AIDS in February, she died under a heavy cloud of silence. But why? Was it because of the shame and guilt attached to the still stigmatized disease, or, as the Israeli media suggested, was there a...
  • Spotlighting a Neglected Disease

    By Nancy Sokoler Steiner

    November 18, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    When Pam Acosta's mother, Rose, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in June of 1996, Acosta was at a loss. The only thing she knew about the disease was that it claimed actor Michael Landon's life. "The doctors offered no answers, no hope. Only a three- to six-month sentence," says...
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