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Jewish Journal

Tag: Childhood

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  • Paper Cranes:  Talking to Children About Japan

    By Sarah Tuttle-Singer

    March 25, 2011 | 4:55 am

    I remember the first time I heard the story about Sadako and the thousand paper cranes.  I was five years old, and I was sitting cris-cross-applesauce on the big blue rug next to my best friend, Rachel. We were giggling.  We had finished drawing our pictures of shining suns and...

  • MICHAEL JACKSON: Memories of my Childhood

    June 26, 2009 | 2:43 pm

    This column originally appeared in OLAM Magazine, a journal of Jewish spirituality.  Reprinted here with permission of the editor, David Suissa. To read David Suissa’s reflection on meeting Jackson, click here.

    When I look back on my childhood, it is not an idyllic landscape of...

  • Religion: The ‘first and worst’ explanation

    October 23, 2008 | 1:25 am

    Until about 1832, when it first seems to have become established as a noun and a concept, the term "scientist" had no really independent meaning.

    "Science" meant "knowledge" in much the same way as "physic" meant medicine, and those who conducted experiments or organized field...

  • Happy birthday to me

    By Marty Kaplan

    August 21, 2008 | 12:07 am

    Not long ago, a guy I know, a good guy who to all outward appearances seems happy and successful, replied to a birthday e-mail I sent him at work -- "go home and blow out some candles" -- with this:

    "I'm 40-f---ing-8, give me a break. They tell me that's close to 50, but I refuse...

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  • Card-Table Tales

    By Sharon Rosen

    April 14, 2005 | 8:00 pm

     

    I confess that most of my childhood Passover memories have nothing to do with the Passover story itself. How could they when seders were family dramas enacted against a backdrop of matzah and gefilte fish? Like most American Jewish kids, I started out observing the proceedings from...

  • Turning The Pages of Childhood

    By Judy Gruen

    July 22, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    "Mommy, will you read to me?"

    My 10-year-old daughter asks me this question every night. Even if I'm exhausted, or just want some time to myself, I almost always say yes. Before I turn around, she'll be 11, then 12, then a teenager.

    She will no longer need her reading fix with...

  • Filmmakers Bring Maturity to Cinema

    By Tom Tugend

    April 22, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Israeli filmmaker Shemi Zarhin is a gourmet cook and baker, whose diet-defying cakes, especially, soothe the vilest temper.

    "I cook Sephardic style, Ashkenazi and Japanese," Zarhin said in a phone call from Tel Aviv. "Next time you're in Israel, come by and I'll show you."

    Not by...

  • A Towering Achievement

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    March 11, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    At a willowy 5-foot-10 1/2, Jennifer Rosen ticks off the quandaries of growing up supertall, female and Jewish: At her Miami Beach religious school she scraped her knees on the desk, which practically stuck to her backside when she stood up. At her Conservative bat mitzvah, she...

  • How Do We Pass on Our Jewishness?

    By Susannah Heschel

    March 4, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    All of us struggle with the problem of how to transmit our commitment to Judaism to the next generation. There are all sorts of suggestions -- but no solutions. How do we reproduce ourselves Jewishly?

    I have a passion for Jewishness, for every manifestation of it, from Workmen's...

  • Funding Our Jewish Future

    By Rachel Pomerance

    December 4, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Imagine a world in which every newborn child receives a voucher toward early childhood Jewish education and a free trip to Israel.

    That's what philanthropist Michael Steinhardt asked 4,000 delegates to the North American Jewish federation system's General Assembly to consider...

  • I’m Dreaming of My School’s Sukkah

    By Julie G Fax

    October 9, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    The sound of metal folding chairs scraping against rocky parking lot asphalt always gives me the chills -- but only in a good way.

    To me it's the sound of Sukkot in the Shaarei Tefila sukkah, where I ate soggy tuna sandwiches and carrot sticks out of rumpled paper bags for most of my...

  • ‘Camera’ Exposes Director’s Past

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    July 3, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    While growing up on his Encino cul-de-sac in the 1980s, Darren Stein made films with his father's video camera, bossily directing the other Jewish kids like a baby Roger Corman. The sets were backyards; production was every afternoon save for Hebrew school hours at Leo Baeck and...

  • Lifeline for Kids

    By Gaby Wenig

    October 10, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Talia Hill, 11, was born with cerebral palsy, epilepsy and bone deformities. She is hearing impaired, speech impaired, mobility impaired, fine-motor impaired and neither her two arms nor her two legs are the same length. In her short life, she has had multiple surgeries, a hearing...

  • ‘Invincible’ Obsession

    By Judy Bart Kancigor

    August 29, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    In the 1920s, the son of a destitute blacksmith from Lodz, Poland, amazed the world with his feats of strength. Heralded as the modern Samson and the Iron King, Zishe Breitbart became a Jewish folk hero, twisting bars of iron, pulling trains by his teeth and killing bulls with his...

  • The Lost Yiddish World

    By Tom Tugend

    August 8, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    "In many ways, it was a good world. In many ways, it was a hard world," observes narrator Elliott Gould in introducing "A Yiddish World Remembered."

    It is not easy to evoke a lost era through television footage, but "Yiddish World" largely overcomes the difficulty.

    There are lively...

  • O.C. Olim

    By Ilene Schneider

    June 6, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    David and Lori Melman, former Santa Ana residents, look out their window to see a mountaintop covered with scrub oak and bay

    leaves that could be mistaken for coastal California foothills. The idyllic country lifestyle and its neighborhood feeling is what lured them to Har Halutz, a...

  • Man of Action

    By Michael Aushenker

    March 28, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    If there is a name for comic book action, it must be "David Goyer."

    When the 36-year-old screenwriter is not bringing superheroes to life in hyperactive flicks -- such as the just-released "Blade 2," starring Wesley Snipes -- Goyer is doing it in the pages of D.C. Comics. "Justice...

  • Frequently Asked Questions

    By Marlene Adler Marks

    March 14, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    I was the oldest child at the Passover table during two decades of social turmoil, and so invariably I was the one to whom questions were directed.

    "Why does your generation think it can have everything its way?" my relatives began after the afikomen was eaten. They wanted my opinion...

  • Making a ‘Beautiful Mind’

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 7, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    When Akiva Goldsman was growing up in Brooklyn Heights, his playmates were the mentally ill children who lived in the group home his parents had founded in their rambling old brownstone. The children suffered from autism and schizophrenia -- weeping and raging were de rigeuer -- but...

  • Childhood’s Sweet Sharp Imprint

    By Gina Nahai

    May 17, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    It is summer, a long time ago, and I am lying on a terrace overlooking an ancient garden full of rosebushes and fruit trees. The days have been so hot, the asphalt on the sidewalk melts under my feet if I dare step out of the house. At night, the temperature drops. My sisters and I...

  • Winona Ryder—Girl Interrupted

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    December 23, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    At first glance, the author Susanna Kaysen and the actress Winona Ryder have little in common. Kaysen, who is in her 50s and the author of several well-received volumes, grew up upper-middle-class and Jewish in Cambridge, MA and is the daughter of an economics professor. And Ryder,...
  • Mothers and Daughters

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 4, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    White Oleander

    By Janet Fitch

    Little, Brown, $24..

    When author Janet Fitch was 9, her longtime friend disappeared into the netherworld of the Los Angeles foster care system.

    The girl's mother had died, then her father and an elderly aunt. When her older brother, a junkie, was arrested,...