Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Tag: Charles Marowitz

View the most popular tags overall?

  • The Wearing Down of the Green

    By Charles Marowitz

    November 12, 1998 | 7:00 pm

    It is hard to believe that "The Cripple of Inishman" was written only a few years ago by a contemporary Irish playwright, Martin McDonough. The play, which has just opened the Geffen's new season looks, feels and sounds like something Lennox Robinson or Lady Gregory might have dashed...
  • Withdrawals from the Memory Bank

    By Charles Marowitz

    October 1, 1998 | 8:00 pm

    Jonathan Tolins' first play, "Twilight of the Golds," caused a strong tremor when it was produced at the Pasadena Playhouse in 1993. A science-fictional comedy, it bounced off the provocative theory that sexual orientation could be biologically determined by analyzing the DNA of the...
  • Shylock Reinterpreted

    By Charles Marowitz

    August 27, 1998 | 7:59 pm

    Venice" is 400 years old. The play was first entered on the register of the Stationer's Company in July 1598, along with a proviso that it shouldn't be published till the Lord Chamberlain gave his consent. And that didn't happen until 1600. It may...

  • Watch Your Language

    By Charles Marowitz

    June 18, 1998 | 8:00 pm

    Jewish Journal theater critic Charles Marowitz writes from Malibu.

    Watch Your Language

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, with front-runners such as T.S. Eliot, Christopher Fry and Archibald Macleish, there was a...

  • ADVERTISEMENT
    PUT YOUR AD HERE
  • George Jean Nathan:

    By Charles Marowitz

    June 11, 1998 | 8:00 pm

    No matter how impressive Nathan the Critic ever becomes, he is constantly subverted by Nathan the Dandy, the man who is more concerned with witty badinage and flip cynicism than he is hard, critical reasoning.

    George Jean Nathan: A True Critic...

  • Endangered Species

    By Charles Marowitz

    April 2, 1998 | 7:00 pm

    Rachel Rosenthal, her bald pate gleaming withsweat and her stark features grooved like gashes in alabaster, lookslike a female Erich von Stroheim -- who, let's face it, could himselfhave been a woman in drag. Short, stubby, Teutonic, and with the kindof wracked expression one...