Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Tag: Characters

View the most popular tags overall?

  • A New Blend of Chick-Lit Sleuth

    By Susan Josephs

    April 21, 2005 | 8:00 pm

     

    "Sex, Murder and a Double Latte" (Red Dress Ink, $17.95)

    Like her protagonist Sophie Katz, Kyra Davis has skin the color of a "well-brewed latte." That's why she has spent a large portion of her life fielding comments about her ethnicity.

    There was her supervisor at a clothing...

  • Leaving L.A.

    By Tom Teicholz

    April 21, 2005 | 8:00 pm

     

    When I go out of town, I often take a novel or two with me, knowing that a plane ride remains one of the few places to get serious reading done. Recently, I read two novels, Seth Greenland's "The Bones" (Bloomsbury) and Bruce Bauman's "And the Word Was" (Other Press), which made...

  • Friend of the Devils

    By Keren Engelberg

    January 20, 2005 | 7:00 pm

     

    Nicole Berger's empathy for demons began early in life."I'm always fascinated by the falling of a soul or the sensitive tender side of an evil character," she said. "When I saw 'The Exorcist,' I thought, 'Why is this demon so screwed up?'"

    That kind of empathy helps to explain the...

  • A Skittish Homage to Cynthia Ozick

    By Daniel Asa Rose

    October 21, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    "Heir to the Glimmering World," by Cynthia Ozick (Houghton Mifflin, $24).

    Confession: It's not Virginia Woolf I'm afraid of -- it's Cynthia Ozick. Even though she blurbed my last book (disclosure, disclosure) and once recommended me for a fellowship I didn't get (thanks for the...

  • ADVERTISEMENT
    PUT YOUR AD HERE
  • ‘First’ an Atypical New York Story

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    October 21, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    A brother announces to his sister that another sister has vanished, as "The First Desire" (Pantheon) opens. Nancy Reisman's highly-praised novel is unusual in many ways, from its premise to the quality of writing to its setting. She follows the lives of the Cohen family, from the...

  • Little Miss Shmutzy

    By Gaby Wenig

    July 8, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    Anne-Marie Baila Asner was concerned that Yiddish words were disappearing from the vernacular. After all, she only knew about 30 words, and most of her peers knew even fewer.

    So she decided that she was going to reinvigorate Yiddish by writing and illustrating cute, brightly colored...

  • Curtain to Rise on Women’s Conflicts

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    February 26, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    In a rehearsal room at the Odyssey Theatre, Colette Freedman propped her electric-blue high tops on a chair and good naturedly laughed at herself. "I'm truly flawed," the 30-ish actress-playwright said. "I am totally a hypocrite."

    Well, not totally. While her "Deconstructing the...

  • A Happy Ending Even for an Indie

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 13, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    One week after her 1998 wedding, New York actress Isabel Rose packed up her belongings and moved with her husband to London.

    Although the Yale graduate had achieved some success in the theater, she said her parents had different expectations.

    "I was raised to be a nice Jewish wife...

  • Good Timing Lands Luck in Director’s Lap

    By George Robinson

    September 18, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    I'm sure that when Greg Pritikin made his first feature film, "Dummy," now in theaters, he had no inkling that he had inadvertently grabbed an indie-film brass ring. But when he cast Adrien Brody as a maladroit but sweet schlemiel who is obsessed with ventriloquism as the way to win...

  • Fear and Self-Loathing in Atlanta

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    September 4, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    When Alfred Uhry was growing up in a German Jewish family in Atlanta, he didn't know what a bagel was. The word, "klutz" was as foreign to him as Chinese.

    "I never attended a bar mitzvah, much less had one," Uhry, 66, said from his Manhattan home.

    Instead, he sang the lead solo in a...

  • Murder and Intrigue in ‘Palestine’

    By Susan Miron

    July 24, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    Jonathan Wilson's new novel, "A Palestine Affair," opens, quite spectacularly as Mark Bloomberg, a painter, and his non-Jewish American wife, Joyce, having just made love in their new Jerusalem home, go outside to their garden. A softly moaning, bleeding man in Arab dress rushes...

  • Delightful Offensiveness Key to ‘Producers’ Genius

    By Tom Teicholz

    June 5, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    To understand something of the success of "The Producers," it helps to understand something of its history. There is probably no person on the planet who doesn't know the story of how this sensation of a musical came to pass, but let me quickly recap: In the early '60s, Mel Brooks...

  • Clay Feat

    By Michael Aushenker

    April 17, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    It may have been a silent film, but Paul Wegener made an international noise with "Der Golem." The 1920 German Expressionist classic -- screening April 21 at the Skirball Cultural Center -- remains a popular incarnation of the Golem. But it was not the first, nor the last,...

  • Lainie Kazan’s ‘Big Fat’ Jewish Life

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    April 10, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    When Lainie Kazan first read the screenplay of Nia Vardalos' "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," now a frothy CBS sitcom, she could relate.

    Vardalos said she based the characters on her large, "loud, always-eating Greek family that loves me to the point of suffocation." And Kazan, who...

  • A Man Without Fear

    By Michael Aushenker

    February 13, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    When Marvel Comics founding father Stan Lee created Daredevil in 1964, he tagged his blind superhero: "Man Without Fear." The nickname also applies to Avi Arad, head of Marvel Studios, Marvel Enterprises' film/television division. Israeli-born Arad rescued Marvel from Chapter 11...

  • Fear and Loathing in ‘America’

    By Keren Engelberg

    January 16, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Iris Bahr is pretty, but you could watch her for the full span of her 54-minute one-woman production and still manage to miss that. 

    With the help of a masculine hairdo (she cut her hair for the show, and wears it slicked back) and some minimal wardrobe changes, Bahr morphs into...

  • The Problem With Julie

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    August 29, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Like the know-it-all self-help guru in her neurotic comedy, "Amy's Orgasm," 28-year-old filmmaker Julie Davis had never had what you'd call an actual boyfriend back in 1998. But she liked to dish out relationship advice. "I had all these theories," says the effervescent...

  • Un ‘Common’ Characters

    By Mike Levy

    January 24, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Two garbage bags full of dead birds separate four Brooklyn buddies from their dreams in actor-playwright Matthew Klein's debut production, "The Common Man."

    Japs Peretti (Klein), estranged son of a Mafia don, looks to rival mafioso Joey the Saint for the half-million dollars he...

  • Leave the Czech

    By Mike Levy

    January 3, 2002 | 7:00 pm

    Vivien Straus grew up on a 660-acre kosher, organic dairy farm on the outskirts of a town of 50 in Marin County. She once ran away from home when her parents told her that she had to marry someone Jewish. But the life-changing experience that inspired her play, "Getting It Wrong,"...

  • The Right Type

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 22, 2001 | 7:00 pm

    David Krumholtz has a theory about why he's played so many charming but zhlubby Jewish guys in film and on television. "I must be a zhlub myself," jokes the boyish, amiable, 23-year- old, who was named one of 10 actors to watch by Variety last year. "I've tried to play dashing types,...

  • Searching for ‘Esther’

    By Mike Levy

    June 14, 2001 | 8:00 pm

    Wendy Graf's new comedy "The Book of Esther" focuses on a central character named Mindy, who, like Queen Esther, bravely declares her Jewishness in the face of opposition. Unlike Esther, Mindy doesn't save the Jewish people, but confronts her ardently secular family and friends when...

  • The Artistry of ‘Art’

    By Gene Lichtenstein

    January 21, 1999 | 7:00 pm

    "Tongue of a Bird," now playing at the Mark Taper Forum, is a confoundedly difficult play. I'm not sure whether that's due to this reviewer's denseness or to the layers upon layers of meaning and tortured psychological undertones offered by playwright Ellen McLaughlin.

    In its simplest...