Jewish Journal

Tag: Books

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  • A Gehry biography with in-depth detail, but lacking in passion

    5 days ago

    I generally approach a new biography by attempting to shut out competing noise.  I focus on the biographer and his subject; in this case, Paul Goldberger’s masterful but frustrating new work, “Building Art: The Life and Work Of Frank Gehry” (Knopf).  But this time I didn’t start...

  • The Holocaust in a new and revelatory light

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 9, 2015 | 2:18 pm

    Scholars are notoriously critical and even cranky readers, especially when it comes to the Holocaust. Lucy Dawidowicz (“The War Against the Jews 1933-1945”) was bitterly disparaged by Raul Hilberg (“The Destruction of the European Jews”), and Hilberg was faulted by Hugh...

  • Words to amuse and amaze

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 8, 2015 | 2:42 pm

    Novelist Jonathan Franzen (“The Corrections,” “Freedom”) is such a draw that his public appearances are more like rock concerts than bookstore readings. For example, his gig promoting his new book, “Purity” (Bond Street Books), requires advance tickets at $33 apiece — the ticket...

  • Get kids into the High Holy Days spirit with these new books

    September 3, 2015 | 2:28 pm

    Of the new children’s books of Jewish interest out this fall, many incorporate themes that go beyond High Holy Days fare. Included here are short reviews of the best of the batch, including a biblical story of King David, life in Shanghai at Sukkot time, a concept book for...

  • A story of love and disappointment ,and the life of artist Camille Pissaro

    September 2, 2015 | 11:55 am

    Alice Hoffman’s sentences possess a musical cadence that demand to be read aloud like poetry, which I often did with great pleasure as I read “The Marriage of Opposites” (Simon and Schuster). 

    The story of Rachel Pomié Petit Pizzarro and her son, the renowned Impressionist...

  • Good summer reads for kids

    July 30, 2015 | 9:31 am

    Whether the kids are off to camp, a vacation or just staying at home, summer is a time to find a few good books — and not  just those assigned for book reports as school approaches. It’s not too late to get started. Here is a suggested list of summer reads for kids 

    1. “Death by...

  • A Short Guide to the Good Life

    By Mindy Leaf

    July 14, 2015 | 5:40 am

    This week, I've been dipping into a new/old book on how to live your life. It's called A Strategy for Daily Living by psychiatrist and author Ari Kiev, and was first published in 1973. (And because I live in a bibliophile's house, it was the original, slightly crumbling edition...

  • Miranda Richmond Mouillot’s fascination with an ancestral divorce

    July 13, 2015 | 4:23 pm

    Acknowledging her own anger frightens Miranda Richmond Mouillot more than she realizes, as we discover in her new book, “A Fifty-Year Silence: Love, War and a Ruined House in France” (Crown).  And she has plenty to be angry about.  She grew up a nervous and anxious child in a...

  • Jewish name-calling: a note on Michael Oren, Leon Wieseltier and the art of insult

    By Danielle Berrin

    July 6, 2015 | 1:04 pm

    SHAKESPEARE said it so sweetly.

    “What’s in a name?” the Bard mused in “Romeo and Juliet,” his immortal romance about hostile households. “That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.”

    In Jewish tradition, names are taken a tad more seriously. Families...

  • Nine ways to display your books on a shelf

    By Jonathan Fong

    March 19, 2015 | 10:49 am

    I recently received a decorating S.O.S. call from a friend. She had just bought a beautiful set of bookcases, and as soon as they were installed in her living room, she eagerly placed all her books on the shelves. But something wasn’t right. It all looked a little blah. Unfinished....

  • ‘Anonymous Soldiers’ looks at terrorism from another troubling angle

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    February 25, 2015 | 12:43 pm

    “Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947” by Bruce Hoffman (Knopf) offers an uncomfortable but crucial message: Terrorism works. And the book is all the more disturbing because the examples Hoffman considers are the Irgun and Lehi (perhaps better known as the “Stern...

  • Martin Amis goes inside a fictional Nazi mind

    February 20, 2015 | 11:02 am

    While watching Adolf Eichmann’s trial in Jerusalem in 1961, the philosopher Hannah Arendt wondered: “Could the activity of thinking as such … be of such a nature that it 'conditions' men against evildoing?" To Arendt, Eichmann’s incapacity for critical thinking mirrored the...

  • Say it with song: Children’s books for the Festival of Lights

    December 4, 2014 | 11:45 am

    “I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Dreidel” by Caryn Yacowitz, illustrated by David Slonim (Arthur A. Levine Books). 

    It seems that old ladies don’t just swallow flies anymore. Comical illustrations, all satirizing famous paintings, are the stars of this funny book, beginning on...

  • Ferreting out the truth about a complicated King David

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    November 25, 2014 | 1:13 pm

    King David is like no other figure in the Hebrew Bible. “We know David as majestic king and lowly shepherd, as valiant warrior and soothing singer, as ruthless killer and passionate lover, as enraptured dancer and pious saint,” observes Jacob Wright in “David, King of Israel, and...

  • Holiday season brings authors to SoCal

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    November 24, 2014 | 1:25 pm

    From the Bible to the Broadway stage, readers and gift-buyers can find a wealth of new books in the bookstores, and it’s the time of year when authors, too, are out in the world to talk about their work. Here are five choice opportunities in Southern California.

    It’s the year...

  • Leaving religious life: The ‘un-Orthodox’ path

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    November 21, 2014 | 12:09 pm

    The path between the secular world and highly observant Judaism is a two-way street. The baal t’shuvah travels in one direction, but he or she may be taking the place of someone who has abandoned Orthodoxy.  It is these so-called “defectors” whose lives are explored with color and...

  • Do Jews need more chutzpah? Does Judaism?

    By Michael Berenbaum

    November 19, 2014 | 1:46 pm

    I began reading Rabbi Edward Feinstein’s “The Chutzpah Imperative: Empowering Today’s Jews for a Life that Matters” (Jewish Lights) with two conflicting emotions — admiration and skepticism. Every time I have been in the presence of Feinstein, I have learned something — large or...

  • From Tehran to Tel Aviv

    By Gina Nahai

    November 12, 2014 | 9:47 am

    So there we were, two Israelis, an Iranian Jew and an Iranian Muslim, all writers, sitting on a stage at the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman building. The occasion for the gathering was the publication of two anthologies of short stories, “Tehran Noir” and “Tel Aviv...

  • The diaspora debate: Is it good for the Jews?

    November 5, 2014 | 3:34 pm

    I’m 58, and I still don’t know what kind of Jew I am or really want to be.  I know that in spite of a complete lack of formal training, I remain a loyal Jew; devoted to Jews of all stripes everywhere.  I think I inherited this surety of feeling from my 90-year-old mother whose...

  • Anita Diamant’s ‘The Boston Girl’: An immigrant’s tale, hanging onto the old ways

    October 27, 2014 | 8:46 am

    From the opening of Anita Diamant’s heartwarming novel, “The Boston Girl,” (Scribner), when Addie Bauman, an 85-year-old grandmother recounts her life story to her granddaughter, I was struck by the similarities between the Jewish cultural beliefs and mores in Boston in 1915, when...

  • Carter, Begin and Sadat — Nostalgia for hope of peace

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    October 14, 2014 | 2:35 pm

    Lawrence Wright, a staff writer for The New Yorker, is attracted to moments of high drama and historical significance. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his account of Osama Bin Laden and the events of Sept. 11 in “The Looming Tower,” for example, and he penetrated the inner workings of...

  • Home is where ‘The Luminous Heart of Jonah S.’ is

    October 8, 2014 | 9:49 am

    Gina B. Nahai’s new novel, “The Luminous Heart of Jonah S.” (Akashic Books) is a wildly inventive story of the Soleyman family that travels back and forth in time between 1950s Tehran and present-day Los Angeles. This Iranian Jewish clan was thriving in Iran before Ayatollah...

  • Excerpt from: “The Luminous Heart of Jonah S.”

    By Gina Nahai

    October 8, 2014 | 9:38 am

    That word, aabehroo, is one of those for which no equivalent exists in the English language. It alludes to the impression that others hold of an individual’s virtue and respectability. To have aabehroo means that the world regards a person in high esteem. To lose it — or, more...

  • “The Golem of Hollywood”: A grisly L.A. mystery

    October 1, 2014 | 11:02 am

    They have a way of scaring you, of chasing sleep away, these psychological thrillers that send your heart thumping. Imagine, then, what you are in for when two masters of the genre decide to collaborate. The result is “The Golem of Hollywood,” (G.P. Putnam’s Sons) by bestselling...

  • Three books, three opinions about The Lubavitcher Rebbe

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 23, 2014 | 2:48 pm

    The 20th anniversary of the passing of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (1902-1994) has inspired no fewer than three new biographies, a fact that attests to his enduring importance even outside the Chasidic community he led for four decades. Even more telling, however, is the fact that he is...

  • Noteworthy books for the new year

    September 22, 2014 | 11:59 am

    In my 20s, I studied French culture and became enamored of what the French call “la rentrée littéraire.” Along with their returns to work, school and politics that follow the summer lull, the French immerse themselves in a wave of new books for the season. Here in the United...

  • Three new kids’ books, and some poetry for adults

    September 18, 2014 | 12:01 pm

    “Apple Days: A Rosh Hashanah Story” by Allison Sarnoff Soffer. Illustrated by Bob McMahon (Kar-Ben, 2014)

    Every year at holiday time, Katy looks forward to making applesauce with her mother. When she shares her excitement with her religious school classmates, she also mentions...

  • Jules Feiffer’s ‘Kill My Mother’: You’ll Die Laughing

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 17, 2014 | 3:41 pm

    Last week, I happened to catch the 1971 movie “Little Murders,” adapted by Jules Feiffer from his stage play. It’s a black comedy, mordant but full of insight into the American psyche and the zeitgeist of the era, and it reminded me of the role that Feiffer, and especially his...

  • When David slays Goliath

    By Rabbi David Wolpe

    September 10, 2014 | 9:10 am

    An excerpt from the chapter titled “Young David” from Rabbi David Wolpe’s biography of King David, “David: The Divided Heart” (Yale University Press). Reprinted with permission.

    Divested of armor, David is ready. Goliath takes him for a harmless lad, an insult to his own...

  • Amidst celebrity, Daphne Merkin is wishing still for mother’s love

    August 26, 2014 | 9:09 am

    If you were the wild child among more submissive siblings, who refused to be silenced and cried continually, and fought with all the others about their glaring hypocrisies; chances are you were not your parents’ favorite child.  If you sometimes made disturbing comments about...

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