Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Tag: Book Review

View the most popular tags overall?

  • Involuntary Participant Observation in the ultra-Orthodox World

    By Pini Herman

    February 25, 2013 | 10:05 am

    The recently published The Rebel and the Rabbi’s Son is a fascinating read, even for someone such as this reader who grew up among the ultra-Orthodox without the heavy burdens of a dynastic lineage on his shoulders as did the author, Izzy Eichenstein. The situation is rare and the...

  • The power of maps, in history and politics

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    January 30, 2013 | 3:58 pm

    On display in my office is a globe that captures a perilous moment in time — the world as it existed on very eve of World War II.  The Japanese puppet-state of Manchukuo can be seen in what is today northeast China, but both Austria and Czechoslovakia have disappeared into the...

  • Revolution 2020: Does Life Imitate Art?

    By Lisa Ellen Niver

    January 30, 2013 | 6:51 am

    Reading Chetan Bhagat's Revolution 2020 in December 2012 while traveling by bus throughout India, it has seemed that art imitates life. The newspaper has been alive with the protests in the street with the "pink revolution." The people of India are angry about the mistreatment of...

  • Shining a new light on the Jewish response to Christmas

    November 30, 2012 | 1:43 pm

    From Kung Pao kosher comedy to a swinging Mardi Gras version of the “Dreidel” song, two new Chanukah season releases explore the intriguing, delightful and sometimes perplexing ways in which American Jews have responded to Christmas.

    In a book and an audio CD compilation, the...

  • ADVERTISEMENT
    PUT YOUR AD HERE
  • The illusion of a solution

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 5, 2012 | 10:50 am

    Of all the incendiary books that have been written about Israel over the last year or so, none is quite as fiery as "Israel: The Will to Prevail" by Danny Danon (Palgrave Macmillan: $26).

    Danon is a young activist in the Likud Party and serves as deputy speaker of the Knesset. He...

  • Re-examining Twain’s work, Clemens’ life

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    July 25, 2012 | 11:07 am

    Ira Fistell is a familiar and even beloved figure in the Los Angeles radio market, where he long served as an exceptionally amiable, thoughtful and well-informed talk-show host on subjects ranging from politics and religion to vintage trains and Mississippi steamboats. Along with...

  • Dennis Prager: Man of hard truths

    By David Suissa

    June 20, 2012 | 11:48 am

    As I was reading Dennis Prager’s new book, “Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph,” I found myself increasingly frustrated. The words themselves didn’t bother me; rather, it was that silly contraption I was holding in my hands, what’s known as...

  • Bookmark These for Summer Reading

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 13, 2012 | 12:10 pm

    Summer is here, and the time is right for touring authors. Here are the highlights of the season for poolside and airplane reading, including some local appearances by the authors themselves.


    The premise of Joel Stein’s “Man Made: A Stupid Quest for Masculinity” (Grand...

  • Himmler’s Brain

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 6, 2012 | 11:38 am

    Not long ago, I reviewed Peter Longerich’s benchmark biography of Heinrich Himmler in these pages—a work of meticulous and compelling scholarship about the master architect of the Final Solution, a mostly ordinary human being whose claim on history is that he succeeded in putting...

  • Sari Nusseibeh – Once Upon a Country: A Palestinian Life – A Must Read

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    March 1, 2012 | 10:58 am

    It has taken me five years to read Sari Nusseibeh’s autobiography since it was first published in 2007. I now recommend it to anyone interested in understanding the Palestinian experience during the past 45 years. That experience is brought to light by this brilliant and sensitive...

  • Leaving the an insular, Hasidic world

    February 10, 2012 | 12:22 pm

    “Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots” by 25-year-old Deborah Feldman (Simon & Schuster: $23.00) is painfully good. Through a narrative voice that is almost hypnotic, she puts you immediately in the center of her chaotic world.  Flashes of adult wisdom seem...

  • A Jesus even Jews can love?

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    February 9, 2012 | 3:40 pm

    Rabbi Shmuley Boteach has been accused of nothing less than apostasy by at least one of his fellow rabbis, all thanks to his newly published book, “Kosher Jesus” (Gefen Publishing House: $26). And I am confident some Evangelical Christians will reach the same conclusion if only...

  • “The Hare with Amber Eyes” by Edmund DeWaal – Book Recommendation

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    February 8, 2012 | 1:57 pm

    On a long flight to Israel this past week I read a beautifully written memoir called “The Hare with Amber Eyes” by Edmund DeWaal.  This thoroughly researched work tells the story of four generations of the Ephrussi family, among the most prominent and wealthy Jewish families in...

  • In the beginning, there was Monterey

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    December 21, 2011 | 12:06 pm

    One way to mark the chronology of the counterculture, a pastime that is beloved by the baby boomers, is by reference to rock festivals. Woodstock and Altamont, for example, are now fully transformed into transcendent symbols of life and death, good and evil, the beginning and end of...

  • One advocate’s argument for Israel’s longevity

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    August 23, 2011 | 3:57 pm

    When Hirsh Goodman speaks about the destiny of Israel, people listen.

    Goodman is a former executive of the Jerusalem Post, founder of the Jerusalem Report, and currently serves as a senior research fellow at the Institute for National Security Studies at Tel Aviv University. Now he...

  • Moroccan murder mystery weaves web of deception

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    August 2, 2011 | 5:43 pm

    From the opening passage of “The Honored Dead: A Story of Friendship, Murder, and the Search for Truth in the Arab World” by Joseph Braude (Spiegel & Grau: $26), we suddenly find ourselves in an atmospheric scene right out of “Casablanca” — an empty alleyway in the storied...

  • Expert Mystery-Making by Worthy Heir to Famous Family Name

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    April 6, 2010 | 7:51 pm

    Four years ago, Jesse Kellerman famously entered the family business when he published his first novel, “Sunstroke.” His father is Jonathan Kellerman and his
    mother is Faye Kellerman, both of whom are name-brand mystery novelists in their own rights.

    His influences range from...

  • Edward Hirsch’s Living Poetry, Ripe for Passover Readings

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    March 23, 2010 | 7:18 pm

    The Kirsch family and the Solomon family have long shared a set of haggadot that include a selection of additional texts that we read aloud at our Passover seders. One of my favorite readings is an article by Yehuda Lev that first appeared in The Jewish Journal, an account of his...

  • Books: Pot-smoking antihero proves cathartic for her creator

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    March 13, 2008 | 6:00 pm

    Twenty-nine-year-old Dahlia Finger, the antihero of Elisa Albert's debut novel, "The Book of Dahlia," has an inoperable brain tumor and an attitude.

    Before her diagnosis, Dahlia spent her days smoking pot, watching cheesy movies and eating toaster pastries in the Venice, Calif.,...

  • Firsthand accounts bring WWII London ‘Blitz’ to life

    By Amanda Susskind

    December 13, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    There is no shortage of books, historical and fictional, on the bombing of London during World War II. Peter Stansky's new book, "The First Day of the Blitz," combines history, political commentary and firsthand testimony in a compelling account.

    The "Blitz," misnamed for its...

  • Books: A stranger on a journey

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    September 27, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Sometimes I envision Lillian Leyb walking along Upper Broadway in New York, or trudging up subway stairs. She's solid-looking and pretty, dressed in a mix of hand-me-downs and carrying a worn satchel, still young but with a hard life evident in her step.

    In Amy Bloom's novel "Away,"...

  • Chart a new course with these spiritual guides for the New Year

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    September 13, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    As we think about rewriting our personal narratives in the New Year, adding new pages and chapters, several new books inspire new visions, renewed creativity and new relationships between the calendar and a sense of holiness.

    Beautifully rendered in a poetic and sensitive...

  • Conning a con man

    By Jay Firestone

    August 23, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Rich Siegel's day typically consisted of waking up, going to work, coming home and checking his e-mail. This routine probably would have continued had Siegel not become a bit curious about an e-mail he received from a Nigerian businessman offering him 25 percent of $45.5 million in...
  • Author’s advice on sex and intimacy makes her hot stuff

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    August 23, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    I open Esther Perel's new book on the bus, and I know that my seatmate is staring at the cover photo of a man and woman in bed not touching beneath the red sheets. "Mating in Captivity: Reconciling the Erotic & the Domestic" (HarperCollins) has caught the man's attention, but he...
  • Books to remember this summer by

    By Sandee Brawarsky

    August 16, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Our summers have markers, memories that trigger a specific time: The summer of the walk on the moon, Hurricane Bob or the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles; personal events like a high school prom, a kitchen renovation or a houseguest who long overstays.

    "It was that...

  • Books: Does a Jew pray in the woods?

    By Robert David Jaffee

    August 9, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    In the past 50 years, the world has become accustomed to viewing Jews as city dwellers terrified of nature. Woody Allen's lobster-fearing neurotic is only the most obvious example of this stereotype.

    Yet Rabbi Mike Comins, author of "A Wild Faith," wants us to know that Judaism...

  • God gets a rewrite:
    In the latest literary trend, authors fictionalize Jewish heroes

    By Amy Klein

    August 9, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    "I started fumbling with the layer of my wedding robes, though my hands were trembling and I had a difficult time of it. Heber's amused expression quickly turned to exasperation, and he grabbed me, untied my embroidered hagora -- the sash that held my beautiful red wool kuttonet in...
  • Kirk Douglas packs 90 years of living into latest book

    By Tom Tugend

    August 2, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    For decades as one of Hollywood's brightest stars, Kirk Douglas paid little attention to his religion -- with one exception.

    "I always fasted on Yom Kippur," he recalls. "I still worked on the movie sets, but I fasted. And let me tell you, it's not easy making love to Lana Turner on...

  • Books: Seeds of peace revealed in early coexistence of Jews, Christians and Muslims

    By Rabbi David Wolpe

    June 28, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    History is unkind to generalizations. The confident assertion is too often slain by an inconvenient fact or made obsolete by a new way of looking at the evidence.

    Yet one can be sure that each new crisis -- as well as each old, settled truth -- will call forth a new round of...
  • Who was Moses? Oh wait, I think I know that one…

    By Alexis Gewertz

    May 24, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Stephen Prothero, author of the new book "Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know-And Doesn't" and chair of the religion department at Boston University showed up on "The Daily Show" recently, hawking the fact that his book contains a quiz to test the reader's...
    Page 2     of 3 pages        < 1 2 3 > 
ADVERTISEMENT
PUT YOUR AD HERE