Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Tag: Book Review

View the most popular tags overall?

  • Portrait of a very human King David

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    6 days ago

    When Jews gather to pray, we invoke the Patriarchs and, in some synagogues, the Matriarchs, the Prophets and Mosheh Rabbenu.  The glorious King David, by contrast, is mostly mentioned in connection with the Psalms, whose authorship is attributed to him in pious Jewish tradition....

  • Amidst celebrity, Daphne Merkin is wishing still for mother’s love

    3 weeks ago

    If you were the wild child among more submissive siblings, who refused to be silenced and cried continually, and fought with all the others about their glaring hypocrisies; chances are you were not your parents’ favorite child.  If you sometimes made disturbing comments about...

  • ‘The Lion’s Gate’: Firsthand accounts of the Six Day War

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    July 23, 2014 | 1:05 pm

    From a distance of a half-century, the Six Day War looks very different indeed from what is happening today on the Gaza border, but “The Lion’s Gate: On the Front Lines of the Six Day War” by Steven Pressfield (Sentinel) is a kind of companion reader for those of us who are...

  • Fear of the apocalypse and Edan Lepucki’s ‘California’

    July 15, 2014 | 2:07 pm

    Fear of a publishing apocalypse, to be precise. Most of us never would have heard about Edan Lepucki’s debut novel, California, about a post-apocalyptic Golden State, except for a battle between Amazon and book publishers.  Here’s a short version of a long story: California’s...

  • ADVERTISEMENT
    PUT YOUR AD HERE
  • The true story of how scientists battled Typhus and sabotaged the Nazis

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    July 9, 2014 | 10:29 am

    By now, of course, we know full well that the Holocaust is a bottomless pit. More than a half-century after the liberation of the last camp, new and wholly unsuspecting tales of both suffering and redemption continue to reach us. “The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two...

  • Turning the Shtetl’s image upside down

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 20, 2014 | 2:16 pm

    The biggest challenge that Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern faces in “The Golden Age Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe” (Princeton University Press) is that he is working against more than a century of sentiment and nostalgia, a kind of collective fantasy that reached its...

  • Turan’s pick of pics

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    May 28, 2014 | 10:21 am

    Film critic Kenneth Turan grew up in Brooklyn in the 1950s in an observant home, which means that he did not often enjoy a Saturday matinee at the Lowe’s Pitkin or the Brandt’s Sutter. “That said, I do have a vivid memory of sneaking out to see a vibrant, cleft-chinned Kirk Douglas...

  • A son’s love, and snooping

    May 23, 2014 | 10:36 am

    Those who have enjoyed Mona Simpson’s much-acclaimed first novel, “Anywhere But Here,” will not be disappointed by “Casebook” (Alfred A. Knopf, $25.95). Here, too, with her distinctive wry humor and razor-sharp voice, Simpson, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the winner of...

  • The making of a real spy

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    May 14, 2014 | 11:23 am

    Our idea of what spies actually do is deeply tainted by a century or so of novels and movies, some better than others but all of them fictional. “The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames” by Kai Bird (Crown, $26), by contrast, is the real thing.  And yet, for all of its...

  • Deborah Feldman’s Hasidic ‘Exodus’

    May 8, 2014 | 12:23 pm

    I’m still so worried about Deborah Feldman, the young woman who fled the Satmar Hasidic community in Brooklyn with her small son in tow, and a flood of childhood memories, both horrifying and wonderful.  She chronicled her turbulent early life in her first book, a surprise...

  • Secret Schalit negotiations unveiled

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    April 16, 2014 | 1:10 pm

    Back in 2006, a 19-year-old Israeli soldier named Gilad Schalit was the victim of a weapon of disequilibrium.

    Since Hamas could not defeat the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) in open battle, their operatives entered Israel through an underground tunnel from Gaza, snatched the young...

  • UnRetire: Finding Your Way to Home Sweet Anywhere!

    By Lisa Ellen Niver

    April 2, 2014 | 2:01 pm

    home sweetHome Sweet Anywhere tells the story of Lynne and Tim Martin who decided that their American dream did not involve a white picket fence and a retirement of babysitting grandchildren, watching television and staying in one place.

    They sold their home and started a Home Free...

  • Butterflies are free

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    March 19, 2014 | 2:24 pm

    The exotic byways of history have provided the settings for Dora Levy Mossanen’s previous fiction, including the sizzling “Harem” and “Courtesan” and the magical “The Last Romanov.” Her new novel, “Scent of Butterflies” (Sourcebooks, $14.99), is still a work of exotica, but in a...

  • Why is Susan Taubes important?

    March 17, 2014 | 10:57 am

    In her famous work “A Room of One’s Own” (1929), Virginia Woolf imagines a sister of Shakespeare, whom she names Judith. Woolf explores the reasons why so few women have made their mark in literature and other media. The imagined sister of Shakespeare, Woolf hypothesizes, was as...

  • The Arab Spring’s missed opportunity

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    March 6, 2014 | 9:41 am

    Walid Phares, born and educated in Lebanon, is an experienced observer of events in what he calls “the Greater Middle East.” But perhaps his most telling credentials are found in the fact that he served as a foreign affairs advisor to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney...

  • The twisted tale of John Demjanjuk

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    February 6, 2014 | 10:33 am

    Among Nazi war criminals who have faced justice, ranging from Hermann Goering to Adolf Eichmann, we find John Demjanjuk, who was charged with participating in the murder of 29,060 Jews as a guard at the Sobibor concentration camp. Unlike the more notorious Nazis, Demjanjuk actually...

  • Born loving Stalin, raised to revere Roth

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    January 29, 2014 | 3:46 pm

    The key to Gary Shteyngart’s best-selling novels can be found in the title of his second book: “Absurdistan.” His genius manifests in the making of imaginary people and places that are slightly cracked versions of the real world, and he brings a wry and ironic sense of humor to the...

  • Jews and Muslims, their common threads

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    December 19, 2013 | 5:07 pm

    The encounter between Jews and Muslims, which began during the lifetime of Mohammed, has never been without tensions and conflicts, perhaps never more so than today.  “A History of Jewish-Muslim Relations: From the Origins to the Present Day” (Princeton University Press, $75),...

  • ‘Serenade’: Love and liberation

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    August 21, 2013 | 1:12 pm

    One of the bitter ironies of history is that Hitler and the Nazis loved music but it did nothing to soothe the savage breast of Nazi Germany. A second irony is that the high culture of Western Europe, including its heritage of classical music, featured the compositions and...

  • “The Dead Sea Scrolls – A Biography” – Book Review and Recommendation

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    July 9, 2013 | 7:13 pm

    If you have ever wondered what is so significant about the Dead Sea Scrolls, arguably the most significant archeological discovery of the 20th century, and would like a handbook to explain it all, this book by Dr. John J Collins, Professor of Old Testament Criticism and...

  • The Challenge of Defining Who is a Jew and What is an Israeli Today – A Book Review

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    June 30, 2013 | 6:37 am

    "The 188th Crybaby Brigade – A Skinny Jewish Kid from Chicago Fights Hezbollah," by Joel Chasnoff (publ. 2010) is a well-written, insightful, at times hysterically funny memoir of a young American Yeshiva bucher who sought to live the complete modern Jewish experience while...

  • “Born on a Blue Day” – by Daniel Tammet – Book Recommendation

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    June 20, 2013 | 10:06 pm

    “Born on a Blue Day” (publ. 2007) is an extraordinary memoir written by a young British autistic savant, Daniel Tammet. His mental capacities are so remarkable that he was able to recite Pi to the 22,514th digit and holds the British and European record.

    The author writes about...

  • Will you Love me Anyway?

    By Lisa Ellen Niver

    June 6, 2013 | 8:54 pm

    Author, Tiffany Hawk, will be signing her book, Love Me Anyway, June 7 at 7pm at Book Soup.

    In Tiffany Hawk’s novel, Love Me Anyway: A Novel, Emily and KC seek new lives flying towards their unrealized dreams. Approaching their new job as United Airlines flight attendants...

  • The First Rule of Swimming by Courtney Angela Brkic

    By Lisa Ellen Niver

    May 31, 2013 | 2:11 am

    In The First Rule of Swimming by Courtney Angela Brkic, Luka taught his granddaughter: “The first rule of swimming was to stay afloat.” Madgalena and Jadranka, two sisters who grew up on Rosmarina Island, Croatia, must find a path to balance in this novel. Through the details of...

  • “Sacred Housekeeping - a spiritual memoir” by Harriet Rossetto – Book Recommendation

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    April 3, 2013 | 10:45 am

    Harriet Rossetto was a bright Jewish kid with success written all over her. Like other young women growing up in the early 1960s, she went to college, got married, had a child, and hoped to live happily ever after. It didn’t turn out quite that way, but today she is more fulfilled...

  • If I Lean In, Will I Still Get Checked Out?

    By Tamara Shayne Kagel

    April 2, 2013 | 11:33 am

    Much of the discussion surrounding Sheryl Sandberg's dictum in her recent book Lean In that women self-sabotage their careers by not speaking up and failing to be assertive has revolved around a woman's struggle to fulfill a desire for motherhood and a career. Having not yet...

  • “How To Be A Friend To A Friend Who’s Sick” – Book Recommendation

    By Rabbi John Rosove

    March 27, 2013 | 10:06 am

    Letty Cottin Pogrebin has written an indispensable guide when a member of one’s family or a dear friend becomes ill or suffers a tragic death, what to do, say and not say, how to respond and be the friend the stricken most needs.

    Letty is a founding editor of Ms Magazine, an...

  • Q&A: Many Suicide Terrorists are Suicidal in the Clinical Sense

    By Shmuel Rosner

    March 27, 2013 | 7:12 am

    Adam Lankford Is a criminal Justice professor at the University of Alabama. Dr. Lankford has written for The New York Times, Foreign Policy, Wired, The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, and numerous peer-reviewed journals. His research has been featured by CNN, MSNBC, Fox News,...

  • Involuntary Participant Observation in the ultra-Orthodox World

    By Pini Herman

    February 25, 2013 | 10:05 am

    The recently published The Rebel and the Rabbi’s Son is a fascinating read, even for someone such as this reader who grew up among the ultra-Orthodox without the heavy burdens of a dynastic lineage on his shoulders as did the author, Izzy Eichenstein. The situation is rare and the...

  • The power of maps, in history and politics

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    January 30, 2013 | 3:58 pm

    On display in my office is a globe that captures a perilous moment in time — the world as it existed on very eve of World War II.  The Japanese puppet-state of Manchukuo can be seen in what is today northeast China, but both Austria and Czechoslovakia have disappeared into the...

    Page 1     of 3 pages        1 2 3 > 
ADVERTISEMENT
PUT YOUR AD HERE