Jewish Journal

Tag: Book

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  • Book about mental illness — created by a Jewish father and son — wins National Book Award

    5 days ago

    When Neal Shusterman helped his son Brendan with a second-grade report on the Pacific Ocean’s Marianas Trench, he thought the name of its deepest location, Challenger Deep, would make a great title for a book.

    In fact, for a number of years, whenever Shusterman — the author of...

  • How Israel’s desert became a fecund source of water

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 25, 2015 | 9:47 am

    “Making the desert bloom” is one of the stirring and enduring tropes of Zionist history. So it makes sense for a drought-afflicted country like ours to turn to Israel for an example of how to solve the water crisis. That’s exactly what Seth M. Siegel has done in “Let There Be...

  • FACEBOOK:  Ten Questions for Self Reflection.

    By Dr. Afshine Emrani

    September 16, 2015 | 1:46 pm

    When people tell me that Facebook is a waste, I tell them “it depends on the operator.” 

    In skilled hands a knife can save a life, but some use it to peel oranges. 

    When Otis Redding sang “sitting by the dock of the bay” was he really “wasting time”?

    In August, Mark...

  • Historian Timothy Snyder presents a provocative, new take on the Holocaust

    By Danielle Berrin

    September 9, 2015 | 2:41 pm

    Yale historian Timothy Snyder is among the world’s leading scholars of Eastern Europe. Educated at Oxford, he is the author of five award-winning books, including the acclaimed “Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin,” about Nazi and Soviet mass killings in the 20th century....

  • Author, psychologist delves inside ‘The Israeli Mind’

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    September 2, 2015 | 11:36 am

    Alon Gratch practices psychology in New York but was born and raised in Jerusalem, which puts him in a unique position to tell us how Israelis see the world. Indeed, as he writes in “The Israeli Mind: How the Israeli National Character Shapes Our World” (St. Martin’s Press), “I...

  • The Day Anger Broke Me.

    By Dr. Afshine Emrani

    August 20, 2015 | 12:13 pm

    It’s been eight years.  I still have nightmares about what I had become. 

    My wife and kids are scared in a room.  Sitting on the floor, they are trembling.  She is hugging them protectively, crying.  They are rolled up in fetal position, sobbing.  All I hear is nothing.  I am...

  • The other side of Maxine Kumin

    August 5, 2015 | 4:47 pm

    I think there were always two Maxine Kumins wrestling for space inside of her. 

    In her new memoir, “The Pawnbroker’s Daughter” (W. W. Norton), the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, who died last year at 88, allows us to see only certain parts of her. There is the feeling throughout...

  • All-seeing mother watches family implode

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    July 9, 2015 | 9:49 am

    Rare is the writer who does not look at one of his earlier works and see something he would have changed. Rarer still is the writer who actually makes that change. In “Prayers for the Living” (Fig Tree Books), novelist, memoirist and National Public Radio book critic Alan Cheuse...

  • A child’s life in the Warsaw Ghetto

    By Avishay Artsy

    July 9, 2015 | 9:33 am

    Polish-Jewish doctor and educator Janusz Korczak was famous throughout Europe as director of the Warsaw Ghetto orphanage and an advocate for children’s rights. Despite offers of sanctuary, he chose to accompany his orphans to the gas chambers of Treblinka. This long-heralded hero...

  • A funny — and touching — thing happened when a writer had a son

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 25, 2015 | 2:55 pm

    Etgar Keret is an Israeli writer with an international readership. His stories have been translated into 37 languages, and you can read them in The New Yorker and The New York Times. He’s also been a contributor to the radio program “This American Life.” But if you are not already...

  • Five books you should read this summer

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    June 1, 2015 | 4:23 pm

    Among the most emblematic figures to emerge in Southern California in the 1960s was Sister Mary Corita, a “rebel nun” whose exuberant artwork captured the spirit of that lively era. Her story is told with both compassion and critical skill by biographer April Dammann in “Corita...

  • An incomplete view of Mark Rothko

    April 30, 2015 | 10:54 am

    Annie Cohen-Solal previously has written two extremely well-received biographies – one on Jean-Paul Sartre and another on the famous art dealer Leo Castelli, but she can’t seem to find on the abstract expressionist painter Mark Rothko. Her new biography, “Mark Rothko” (Yale...

  • Ghosts of exile, examined

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    February 12, 2015 | 10:23 am

    Roger Cohen is an observer of Israel and the Middle East whose voice is especially commanding, and not only because he writes for The New York Times. As a former foreign correspondent, he is deeply experienced in the travails and troubles of the contemporary world. In “The Girl...

  • Russian-Jewish author explores breaking rules to get by

    By Rebecca Spence

    February 5, 2015 | 11:32 am

    When Boris Fishman began writing “A Replacement Life,” his award-nominated debut novel about a frustrated writer who forges Holocaust restitution claims for Soviet Jews in Brooklyn, he had no idea that the premise of his work-in-progress was playing out in real time.

    In the fall...

  • Forensic pathologist is no regular ‘Working Stiff’

    By Naomi Pfefferman

    November 25, 2014 | 11:23 am

    Dr. Judy Melinek can’t watch “CSI,” “Bones” and the myriad other medical examiner (ME) shows that have exploded on to television. “I end up yelling at the TV and throwing things,” Melinek, 45, a forensic pathologist for Alameda County who also testifies in cases throughout the...

  • Could we live without the Supreme Court?

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    November 12, 2014 | 2:41 pm

    Anyone who has the opportunity to chat with Erwin Chemerinsky, as I recently did, will find him a gracious, affable and reasonable person — a real mensch. But if you read his latest book, “The Case Against the Supreme Court” (Viking), you will discover that he is capable of taking...

  • ‘Paper Love’: Paving the way for post-survivor storytelling

    November 4, 2014 | 3:38 pm

    As the last generation of Holocaust survivors ages and dies, efforts to capture their final, untold stories have abounded. But in her new book “Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind,” Sarah Wildman has turned instead to the future, asking what it means bear...

  • A future without Jews; If anti-Semitism won

    October 29, 2014 | 11:40 am

    Just how frightening is it to be a British Jew these days? Although it’s comforting to know that the security guard who prohibited two Jewish boys from entering a sporting goods store in Hertfordshire, England, last month was fired, Jewish residents are starting to feel...

  • ‘The Fame Lunches’: Daphne Merkin is still wishing for mother’s love

    August 27, 2014 | 2:03 pm

    If you were the wild child among more submissive siblings, who refused to be silenced and cried continually, and fought with all the others about their glaring hypocrisies; chances are you were not your parents’ favorite child.  If you sometimes made disturbing comments about...

  • ‘Woody on Rye’: Jewishness in the works of Woody Allen

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    August 20, 2014 | 1:41 pm

    A few years ago, I discovered that there is actually something called The Big Lebowski Studies, a tongue-in-cheek academic discipline wholly devoted to a single Coen brothers movie (and, if I may say so, hardly their best movie). Yet, as far as I have been able to tell, no such...

  • Schmuck and the City

    By Nikki Tabibian

    August 13, 2014 | 11:57 am

         During my first months on the East Coast, snowfall, rain and hail hit The City, while a storm of vexing questions plagued my frozen suburban mind:

         How many layers are too many?
         Would it be appropriate to wear a hijab to fight off a 30-degree chill? 

  • Iranian-Jewish doctor spreads Holocaust truth in Farsi

    By Karmel Melamed

    May 7, 2014 | 1:34 pm

    As Jews worldwide remembered and honored the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust in recent weeks, Dr. Ari Babaknia, a renowned Newport Beach Iranian-Jewish obstetrician and gynecologist, was crisscrossing the country — touring Southern California and New York City — and...

  • Giving up Bread or Internet for Passover? Finding Balance and Freedom on Tax Day

    By Lisa Ellen Niver

    April 15, 2014 | 9:05 am

    Giving up Bread or Internet for Passover? Finding Balance and Freedom on Tax Day

    For the last year and a half I have been living in Asia and eating rice. As I thought about Passover approaching, I figured giving up bread for eight days would not be meaningful as I really only eat...

  • The twisted tale of John Demjanjuk

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    February 6, 2014 | 10:33 am

    Among Nazi war criminals who have faced justice, ranging from Hermann Goering to Adolf Eichmann, we find John Demjanjuk, who was charged with participating in the murder of 29,060 Jews as a guard at the Sobibor concentration camp. Unlike the more notorious Nazis, Demjanjuk actually...


    January 31, 2014 | 2:08 pm

    A year after graduating college, I worked downtown in the immense shadows of the World Trade Center, and as part of my freewheeling, four-hour daily lunch break I would eat and drink my way past these two giants, up Broadway, down Fulton Street and over to the Strand Book Annex. In...

  • Six million reasons I don’t like the new Holocaust book

    January 27, 2014 | 12:00 pm

    I admit it. I dropped the ball on the story about the new remember-the-Holocaust-by-printing-the-word-Jew-six-million-times book. I saw it sitting in a veteran Jewish journalist’s office a week ago, but forgot to bring it up to my fellow JTA editors.

    And then I look at the...

  • Three different ‘Family’ ways

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    December 12, 2013 | 1:25 pm

    Word of mouth is the real maker of best sellers in the publishing world, and I can think of few books with quite as much buzz as David Laskin’s remarkable family chronicle, “The Family: Three Journeys Into the Heart of the Twentieth Century” (Viking, $32).

    Laskin tells a story —...

  • Living at the heart of a “Promised Land”

    By Michael Berenbaum

    December 12, 2013 | 11:16 am

    Ari Shavit, My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel (New York: Spiegel and Grau, 2013) pp. 449).

    The anguish of the believer is not the same as that of the renegade, and Ari Shavit writes as a believer in the Zionist enterprise. Not Zionism in the mystical sense that...

  • Warsaw’s other uprising

    By Jonathan Kirsch

    December 4, 2013 | 6:34 pm

    For most Jewish readers, I suspect, the phrase “Warsaw uprising” refers to the stirring last stand of the Jewish ghetto fighters in 1943.  But there was quite another upwelling of armed resistance in Warsaw a year later, and that’s the focus of “Warsaw 1944: Hitler, Himmler and the...

  • Encounters with the past: Parashat Vayigash (Genesis 44:18-47:27)

    December 4, 2013 | 4:27 pm

    Why is this book club different from all other book clubs? I know this phrase is out of season, but the strange confluence of holidays this year permits some flexibility. As my Torah study cohorts and I again engage with the page-turner of all page-turners, the Joseph story, I am...

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