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Jewish Journal

Tag: Architecture

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  • A “Sukkah City” to rise in St. Louis

    By Jonah Lowenfeld

    October 10, 2011 | 7:50 pm

    A cocoon of whirling prairie grasses, a pavilion with a ceiling of carefully angled tubes, a shelter made entirely of wind chimes—these and seven other architecturally innovative booths will be erected on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis on Oct. 17 to celebrate the...

  • Sacred spaces

    By Jonah Lowenfeld

    August 19, 2011 | 2:36 pm

    Ever catch yourself on Rosh Hashanah flipping through the remaining pages of the prayer book, mentally calculating how much longer you’ll be there? How about counting the number of tiles in the ceiling? To pray, an individual has to push his thoughts beyond mere material things,...

  • Architects ask: What might a Palestinian West Bank look like?

    By Jonah Lowenfeld

    January 5, 2011 | 9:40 am

    “Decolonizing Architecture,” an exhibition on view at REDCAT, the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater in downtown’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, assumes that the current residents of Israel’s settlements in the West Bank will ultimately have to evacuate their homes. The three...

  • VIDEO: Architecture as experience - Daniel Libeskind

    July 11, 2008 | 6:19 pm


    Celebrated architect Daniel Libeskind discusses his views of architecture as a spiritual and aesthetic experience, citing the examples of two sites he designed: the rebuilding of New York City’s World Trade Center, and San Francisco’s Contemporary Jewish Museum.

     

     

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  • Seven synagogues torched in Tehran

    By Brad A. Greenberg

    April 17, 2008 | 6:17 pm

    Seven ancient synagogues in the Iranian capital, Tehran, have been destroyed by local authorities.

    The synagogues were in the Oudlajan suburb of Tehran, where many Iranian Jews used to live.

    “These buildings, which were part of our cultural, artistic and architectural heritage were...

  • Legends and lies

    By Sam Hall Kaplan

    December 13, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    If the plans follow the promises of its sponsors, the site of the next preeminent national Jewish institution will be in the historic heart of Philadelphia.

    There, steps from the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, edging a revitalized Independence Mall, the proposed National Museum...

  • ‘LA is the apocalypse’

    By Brad A. Greenberg

    November 12, 2007 | 9:56 am


    I’m taking off right now to interview Jonah Lehrer about his first book, “Proust Was a Neuroscientist,” so I saw it fitting to finally write about this post I saw on his blog a few weeks ago, a link to BLDGBLOG, a well-written architecture blog.

    L.A. is the apocalypse: it’s you and a...

  • ‘Holy Hampton Hostilities’

    By Brad A. Greenberg

    September 17, 2007 | 4:36 pm

    “Goldman Ex-Partner, Hedge-Fund Chief Sender Fight Over Church.”  That’s a headline on Bloomberg.com this morning, and the issue at hand is as ridiculous as it might suggest. 

    Dennis Suskind, formerly of Goldman Sachs, has bought a Methodist church in Sag Harbor, New York with...

  • Roman Holiday

    By Rob Eshman

    July 19, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    On vacation in Rome, we lucked into an apartment with a terrace overlooking Campo de'Fiori. During the morning hours, the square is a bustling open-air market, and we would walk down and lose ourselves among the piles of cherries, white peaches and arugula.

    By midday the vendors...

  • Briefs: Tel Aviv Museum of Art gets new building named for the Amirs

    June 21, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    Construction begins on Tel Aviv Museum of Art addition named for Herta and Paul Amir

    Construction is underway for a bold new addition to the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, designed by American architect Preston Scott Cohen and named for Los Angeles-based philanthropists Herta and Paul...
  • Exhibition offers visions of future intelligent homes

    By Sam Hall Kaplan

    May 10, 2007 | 8:00 pm

    For those who love the experience of shopping for real estate, "Open House: Architecture and Technology for Intelligent Living," on display in Pasadena at Art Center College of Design's south campus, is not the usual collection of modish conceits by residential architects.

    Organized...
  • Prefab housing gets ‘fab’

    By Sam Hall Kaplan

    February 22, 2007 | 7:00 pm

    "I try not to drive on Shabbos, except, of course, to go to open houses," explained a woman of a certain age and uncertain religious persuasion.

    Maybe the curiosity was whetted when wandering in the desert for 40 years, in the ancient past, looking for a place to put down roots and...

  • Prager; CAIR; Gibson; The Boot!

    December 14, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    CAIR

    It is getting somewhat boring to read yet another letter in The Jewish Journal from such a disingenuous character as Hussam Ayloush (Letters, Dec. 1). Typical of Ayloush and other CAIR officials, he engages only in ad hominem smears and refuses to deal with the substantive...

  • Designing woman preserves observatory’s past for future

    By Morris Newman

    November 2, 2006 | 7:00 pm

    Brenda Levin sometimes said that she wishes her original architectural designs would get as much attention as her historic-preservation efforts, such as the restoration she's just completed of the Griffith Observatory. If so, there is no detectible ambivalence in her voice on this...

  • Museum-hopping in Madrid, sans ham

    By Hilary Larson

    October 19, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    What is the best museum town in the world? Paris comes to mind, as does New York. But as a certified art museum lover, I put my money on Madrid.

    Madrid, the proud and stately capital of Spain, is home to three of the finest collections of art anywhere: the Museo del Prado, the...

  • Which came first: the building or the dress?

    By Morris Newman

    September 14, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    A model at a Parisian fashion show sports an enormous collar that almost hides her head in an aureole of stiff, folded cloth. So stiff does the cloth appear, in fact, that it could almost be mistaken for concrete. Meanwhile, in Yokohama, Japan, architects have covered the ceiling of...
  • Shlub to Hero: Film Sketches Gehry Life

    By Morris Newman

    May 18, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    "He starts out with that," says Barry Diller, alluding to a squiggle-like drawing in the new documentary, "Sketches of Frank Gehry," and "he ends up with this," pointing to a model of the InterActive Corp. (IAC) Building, currently under construction in Manhattan. Although made...

  • Hancock Park Infighting Escalates

    By Julie G Fax

    April 13, 2006 | 8:00 pm

    Update September 25, 2007: City Building & Safety inspectors briefly interrupt Kol Nidrei services at Hancock Park shul.

    Smoldering tensions between the Orthodox community and other Hancock Park residents, many of them also Jewish, are heating up anew, as a battle over...

  • Three Museum Shows Span Gamut of Arts

    By Ed Rampell

    December 8, 2005 | 7:00 pm

    Architecture is for the photographer Julius Shulman what green peppers and sand dunes were for Edward Weston or Yosemite for Ansel Adams. Born in 1910, Shulman's iconic images have become a staple of every book or magazine that touches on the subject of modern architecture.

    In...

  • Historically Sacred L.A.

    By Gaby Friedman

    July 28, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    Robert Berger is a third-generation Angeleno who dares to do the unthinkable in Los Angeles.

    He actually gets out of his car and studies old buildings.

    Berger, an architectural photographer with Berger/Conser Architectural Photography, is interested in historic Los Angeles....

  • Get ‘Wicked’ in the Windy City

    By Shoshana Lewin-Fischer

    June 2, 2005 | 8:00 pm

    If you're not willing to wait to see the Wicked Witch of the West melt at the Pantages, you can always skip down the Yellow Brick Road, click your heels three times and say: "There's no place like Chicago."

    "Wicked," the Tony-award winning Oz-based musical is currently playing at the...

  • Wilshire: Boulevard of Sanctuaries

    By Kevin Roderick

    November 11, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    Wilshire Boulevard's stature as the grand concourse of Los Angeles is due in part to its many architecturally distinct synagogues and churches. Those located in the Wilshire Center district, between LaFayette Park and about Western Avenue, are some of the most notable and serve some...

  • Say Cheese, L.A.

    By Leora Alhadeff

    May 20, 2004 | 8:00 pm

    What's a Brooklyn-born Jewish engineer doing photographing the streets of Los Angeles?

    "Anything is possible," said Larry Brownstein, photographer, author and publisher of "Los Angeles, Where Anything is Possible." (Brownstein Publications, $19.95)

    "My folks were encouraging me to...

  • Freewheeling Around D.C.

    By Lisa Alcalay Klug

    March 4, 2004 | 7:00 pm

    When Stephen Marks and his wife, Janna, acquired Bike the Sites in December 2002, they didn't realize how their two-wheeled tours of Washington, D.C., would translate to a Jewish audience.

    "We put together some talking points to generate discussion and thought from a Jewish...

  • Mojitos and Matzah Balls in Havana

    By Larry Luxner

    November 6, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Care for an authentic Cuban mojito at the L'chaim bar? How about Israeli salad, matzah ball soup and cheese blintzes?

    They're all now on the menu at the Hotel Raquel, Cuba's first boutique hotel catering specifically to adventurous Jewish tourists.

    Richly illustrated passages from...

  • 7 Days In Arts

    August 28, 2003 | 8:00 pm

    Saturday





    "Art" for the people: Yasmina Reza's play about the delicate nature of friendships opens today at The Laurel in Ventura. Translated from the French by Christopher Hampton, the words fly among three male friends when one of them pays a good sum of money for a supposedly...

  • 7 Days In Arts

    By Keren Engelberg

    January 30, 2003 | 7:00 pm

    Saturday





    Leo Marmol and Ron Radziner, a Cuban American and a Jewish American (respectively), are "the hottest young architects in Los Angeles," according to The New York Times Magazine. Their firm is well-recognized for projects like their restorations of buildings by Richard...

  • Amsterdam’s Split Personality

    By Anthea Gerrie

    October 17, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    Anne Frank's house, a fabulous 17th century synagogue and an excellent heritage museum give Amsterdam special appeal for Jewish visitors. But they are all sites whose very existence reflect the city's incurable split personality, making for a sightseeing experience that constantly...

  • L.A. Museums: Saved by the Jews

    By Gene Lichtenstein

    August 15, 2002 | 8:00 pm

    A small museum opened its doors in Pasadena last month and naturally enough made local headlines. The stories touched on the museum's focus -- California art, architecture and design from 1850 to the present day; and on the personal angle, namely that the $5 million Pasadena Museum...

  • Berlin Bound

    By Tom Tugend

    December 14, 2000 | 7:00 pm

    More than 300,000 visitors have thronged the Jewish Museum in Berlin since it opened to the public in February 1999, and more are coming at a clip of 20,000 each month.

    The figure is astonishing, considering that the building is completely empty. The exhibits, tracing the...

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