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Two Jewish scientists win Nobel Prize for medicine

JTA

October 4, 2011 | 4:30 pm

Dr. Bruce Beutler is acknowledged by colleagues after being introduced as one of the recipients of the 2011 Nobel Price in Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, Oct. 4. Photo by REUTERS/Tim Sharp

Dr. Bruce Beutler is acknowledged by colleagues after being introduced as one of the recipients of the 2011 Nobel Price in Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, Oct. 4. Photo by REUTERS/Tim Sharp

The Nobel Prize for medicine reportedly was awarded to two Jewish scientists, Ralph Steinman and Bruce Beutler.

The prize was given Monday for discoveries on the immune system, Israel National News reported. Half was awarded to Steinman, with the other half to be split between Beutler and biologist Jules Hoffman.

Steinman will receive the prize posthumously; he died three days before the Nobel committee made the announcement. Though he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer four years ago, Steinman was able to prolong his life by using new dendritic cell-based immunotherapy—the same discovery for which he was awarded the prize.

Only living scientists typically are considered by the Nobel committee, but because its members were unaware of Steinman’s death when the winning names were released, no substitution winner will be announced.

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