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September 29, 2012

by Shmuel Rosner

September 28, 2012 | 3:10 am

A member of the Free Syrian Army prays next to his comrade during clashes in Aleppo, September 27, 2012. (Photo: Reuters)

In-depth

The Iranian Red Line (in One Chart)

Alana Goodman of Commentary Magazine has praise for Netanyahu's controversial prop at his UN speech.

The chart wasn’t unserious, it was simple. And it’s precisely what the public needs to see at this point. The White House has been able to drag their feet on the debate, in part, because they’ve portrayed it as murky and complicated. It isn’t. 

 

Syria's Long War

The fighting in Syria isn't just about removing a corrupt regime, it also has its roots in a decades-long war between the ruling Bathists and the Sunni majority, wrtites Patrick Seale for Agence Global

It is striking ... that virtually all the members of the various armed insurgent groups are Sunni Arabs; that the fighting has been largely restricted to Sunni Arab areas only, whereas areas inhabited by Alawis, Druze or Christians have remained passive or supportive of the regime; that defections from the regime are nearly 100 per cent Sunni; that money, arms and volunteers are pouring in from Islamic states or from pro-Islamic organisations and individuals; and that religion is the insurgent movement’s most important common denominator.

 

The Jewish Vote, 2012

Michael Barone of Jewish Ideas Daily traces the history of Jewish political allegiances in the United States. 

Jewish voters became solidly Democratic after the 1960 election, New York became solidly Democratic as well, and after 1963 New York was no longer the most populous state: it is now about to be passed by Florida, to become number four in population.  Jews now constitute two percent of the national electorate, not four percent as in the 1940s.  
 

For more on this topic, check out my new book, The Jewish Vote: Obama vs. Romney/ A Jewish Voters Guide, in print and ebook formats. 

 

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