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Jewish Journal

7 Days in the Arts

by Keren Engelberg

September 28, 2006 | 8:00 pm

(From left) Deborah Greenfield, Batista Gremaud and Vera Ninkovic in Dialogos

(From left) Deborah Greenfield, Batista Gremaud and Vera Ninkovic in Dialogos

Saturday the 30th

Funny Jewess Rita Rudner takes a break from her regular Vegas shtick to entertain us Angelenos this evening. Pepperdine's Smothers Theatre hosts the comedian before she returns to the City o' Sin for a new contract with Harrah's on Oct. 2.

8 p.m. $65. 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu. (310) 506-4522.

Sunday the 1st


Those living on the social fringe are at the center in Rick Nahmias' photography exhibition, "Golden States of Grace: Prayers for the Disinherited." Now on view at city of Fullerton Museum, the images show a dozen marginalized groups participating in "alternative forms of spiritual expression." It includes Jewish addicts in recovery, who are utilizing a combination of Torah and 12-Steps for spiritual guidance, and inmates at San Quentin, who have converted to Zen Buddhism.

Through Jan. 24. 301 N. Pomona Ave., Fullerton. (714) 738-6545.

Monday the 2nd

Attendees of Yom Kippur services at Sinai Temple this year may find additional inspiration outside the sanctuary. The building's main hallway, known also as Merage Gallery, now displays "The Tapestries of Margaret Handwerker." Eleven intricate works created entirely by hand depict Eden, a simple breakfast table, mountain and sunset scenes. (Photo below.)

Through Dec. 31. 10400 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. Visitors should call the security office in advance: (310) 481-3272.

Tuesday the 3rd

Ambitious and celebrated playwright Heather Woodbury's last performance piece was the award-winning 100-character, eight-act solo play, "What Ever: An American Odyssey," described by the Chicago Sun-Times as a "Whitmanesque vision of America." She focuses in on just two communities this time. "Tale of 2Cities (An American Joyride on Multiple Tracks)" looks at the effects the Brooklyn Dodgers' move to Los Angeles from New York had on the two cities. But count on the same epic proportions as her previous show. The two-part story moves from 1957 through the fall of the Twin Towers, portraying three generations of characters from New York and Los Angeles.

Sept. 30-Oct. 8. $23-$35 (per part), $36-$56 (package). UCLA Live, UCLA Freud Playhouse, Westwood. (310) 825-2101.

www.uclalive.org.

Wednesday the 4th

Still some time for some "Summertime." The Gershwins' classic American opera, "Porgy and Bess," plays tonight and tomorrow night as part of the opening celebration for the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Hear arias, including "Bess, You Is My Woman Now" and "I Loves You, Porgy," through the hall's impressive acoustics. 8 p.m. $50-$140. 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. (800) 346-7372.

www.operapacific.org.

Thursday the 5th

Flamenco and Argentine tango get Jewish flavor in "Dialogos," a shared program of new works from groups Rosa Negra Flamenco and Tango Gravitas. The former, led by choreographer/dancer Deborah Greenfield, features integrations of modern and flamenco dance. The latter, choreographed by Israeli Moti-Moses Buchboot, with partner Chelsea Eng, utilizes Buchboot's varied inspirations, including Argentine tango, kung fu, contact improvisation, the Australian didgeridoo and live percussion.

Oct. 5-15. $22-$26. Unknown Theater, 1110 N. Seward St., Hollywood. (323) 466-7781.

www.unknowntheater.com.

Friday the 6th

Inspired by the essay "The Grey Zone," written by Primo Levi, Tim Blake Nelson penned a play and screenplay of the same name, telling the obscure story of the Sonderkommandos-Jewish prisoners in Auschwitz/Birkenau who worked in the gas chambers in exchange for better treatment. The controversial film was released in 2001, and the play now makes its Los Angeles debut in a guest production at Deaf West Theatre.

Sept. 29-Nov. 5. $20-$30. 5112 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. (800) 838-3006.

www.bitcollaboration.com.

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