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Jewish Journal

7 Days In Arts

April 3, 2003 | 7:00 pm

Saturday



For some soul music (of the Jewish variety) the answer is clear this week: Tonight, Pasadena Jewish Temple and Center hosts "Classical Klezmer: Chamber Music That Reflects the Jewish Soul." The concert features works by Sergei Prokofiev, Ernest Bloch, Paul Schoenfield, Max Bruch and David Schiff, performed by the Aryeh Ensemble. Proceeds will benefit the Weizmann Community Day School in Pasadena and B'nai Simcha Preschool in Arcadia. 8 p.m. $18-$100. 1434 N. Altadena Drive, Pasadena. (213) 626-5863.



Sunday



In the immortal lyrics of great glam rock band Cinderella, "We all need a little shelter. Just a little helper, oooh, and it'll be all right." Backing up their wise words this week and next is a team of international artists. Each of the eight -- four based in Los Angeles and four based in Israel -- contribute their interpretations on the theme of shelter in the exhibition, "Shelter: Miklat: Malja." (The words miklat and malja mean shelter in Hebrew and Arabic, respectively.) The exhibition will travel to Tel Aviv's Limbus Gallery, a converted air-raid shelter, in May. Noon-5 p.m. (Friday-Sunday). Runs through April 18. Brewery Project, 676 South Avenue 21, No. 33, downtown Los Angeles. (323) 222-0222. www.ybstudio.com

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Monday



Jews who just can't get enough of High Holiday prayers can now rejoice and repent all year long. Fitted snuggly back to back in the same CD jewel case are live Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur recordings, sung by Cantor David Montefiore and the Temple Beth El (of Bloomfield, Mich.) Choir. The double album "The High Holy Day Music Tradition" features music by composers like Max Bruch, Louis Lewandowski and Max Helfman. $25. (248) 851-1100, ext. 3152. srice@tbeonline.org.



Tuesday



With applause-inspiring staging by Julie Taymor, the Los Angeles Opera's current production of Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" is quite the spectacle. The singing and music are pretty darn good, too. There are still a few seats left in the run that ends this week. So don the fancy duds. You men'll win big romance points with your ladies for the Tuesday night spontaneity. Final performances this week are April 6 and 8 (7:30 p.m.) and April 12 (1 p.m.). $30-$170. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Music Center, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown Los Angeles. (213) 365-3500.

Wednesday



The mystery of the creative process is explored in Jon Robin Baitz's "Ten Unknowns," now playing at the Mark Taper Forum. The story centers around an American artist and recluse named Malcolm. After 30 years of self-imposed exile in Mexico, Malcolm returns to New York after an art dealer rediscovers his work. Somehow, he must begin painting again. 8 p.m. (Tuesdays-Saturdays), 7:30 p.m. (Sundays), 2:30 p.m. (Saturday and Sunday matinees). Runs through May 4. $31-$45. The Music Center, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 628-2772.

Thursday



The great Alice Walker comes to the Skirball. She's written numerous books since her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Color Purple." Her latest, "Absoloute Trust in the Goodness of the Earth," is also her first book of poetry in more than a decade. She'll read from it and sign copies tonight, in her only Los Angeles appearance. 7:30 p.m. $15 (general), $12 (members), $6 (students). 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. R.S.V.P., (323) 655-8587.

Friday



If you don't yet know the strange story of "Strange Fruit," PBS helps you out this evening. Joel Katz's documentary of the same title tells the full history of the anti-lynching song, including the bizarre twist: While it was long believed to have been written by an African American man, the real composer of the song was not only a Jew, but also one of the two orphaned sons of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. 10 p.m. www.pbs.org

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