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Jewish Journal

It can’t happen here

by Rob Eshman

November 12, 2008 | 12:29 am

A coalition of black and Mormon leaders have begun laying the groundwork for a 2012 California ballot initiative that would ban Jews from marrying Jews.

Flush from the passage of Proposition 8, which banned gay marriage in the state, the leaders say they want to extend the ban to Jews whose emphasis on in-marriage, they say, contravenes Scripture and promotes intolerance and segregation.

"In-marriage is against Scripture," said one organizer. "We are all God's children. It sends a message that one group's blood is too good to mix with another group's blood."

"What are we," the organizer added, "chopped liver?"

Defending what is bound to be a controversial measure, the organizer said strong support for the passage of Proposition 8 in the black, Latino and Mormon religious communities proved that, in four years, more "so-called civil rights" could be reshaped by popular will.

As evidence, he cited pro-Proposition 8 statements from Dr. Frederick K.C. Price, who leads the 22,000-member Crenshaw Christian Center.

"Marriage is between a man and a woman," said Price on behalf of Proposition 8. "Let us stand with God in saying the definition of marriage must not change."

At the urging of their church leaders, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also called the Mormon Church, donated an estimated $22 million to promote Proposition 8 and backed Web sites urging voters to support it.

A letter sent to Mormon bishops and signed by church President Thomas S. Monson and his two top counselors called on Mormons to donate "means and time" to the ballot measure.

"Marriage between a man and a woman is ordained of God, and the formation of families is central to the Creator's plan for His children," Monson wrote.

The authors of the anti-Jewish marriage initiative say when leaders believe they have Scripture on their side, they can get their followers to fix any flaws in any constitution.

"People choose to remain gay, and people choose to remain Jewish," said an organizer. "Why should the majority of us be forced to honor that choice?"

The Jewish prohibition against intermarriage is commonly attributed to a biblical passage, Deuteronomy 7:3: "Neither shalt thou make marriages with them; thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son."

But one church leader said they have an entirely different interpretation of this passage.

"It only applies to Hitties and Amorites," he said, "and I don't see a lot of them around."

By his calculation, the Torah only prohibits intermarriage if the children that result from such a union are turned away from their Jewish faith.

"Moses married Tziporra, who was the daughter of a Midianite priest," said the preacher. "Ruth, the great-grandmother of King David, was a convert. Queen Esther, who saved the Jews from Haman in the Purim story, was married to the Persian, non-Jewish King Ahashverus."

"Don't tell me the Bible doesn't understand intermarriage."

Asked whether he wasn't simply asking voters to impose their interpretation of the Bible on a minority group, one black church leader countered, "Well, what do you think we did with Proposition 8?"

The organizer admitted that the initiative to ban Jewish-Jewish marriage was the first step toward other initiatives to ban kosher slaughter and ritual circumcision, two widespread Jewish practices that the Christian gospel does not follow.

Defending this plan, one organizer cited Pastor Beverly Crawford of Bible Enrichment Fellowship International's defense of her support for Proposition 8: She wasn't saying no to gays, she told the press, but "yes to God" and doing what "the Lord Jesus Christ" would do.

"We think the same rule should apply to all laws, not just marriage laws," said one organizer. "We're not saying no to Jews. We're saying yes to Jesus."

Organizers know they will face a tough battle -- but just among Jews. Some 78 percent of Jewish voters in Los Angeles opposed the ban on gay marriage, and just 8 percent supported Proposition 8, according to exit polling by the Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University.

Meanwhile, a relative handful of Mormon, black and Catholic leaders stood against their churches on Proposition 8. Contacted by The Journal, these leaders said their position was rooted in Scripture and the principle of the separation of church and state. They said they hoped their small example would convince more of their church members to oppose future attempts to curtail civil rights.

But Proposition 8's supporters said they feel the wind at their backs, and they are going forward with their next initiative. Asked how he could possibly succeed in denying the civil rights of a minority based on one narrow interpretation of the Bible, one organizer summed up the feelings of the Jewish-Jewish marriage opponents.

"We did it once," he said. "We can do it again."



Yes, this is satire. No such proposition is in the works, or even a gleam in any group's eye. The Jews have not been singled out for discrimination, just homosexuals. So why worry?


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