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The Best of (Jewish) Los Angeles 2008

July 3, 2008 | 11:31 am

We like to think of our Annual Guide to the Best of (Jewish) Los Angeles as kvetch-proof. Our writers and editors provide personal favorites that are so idiosyncratic and eclectic that it's hard to argue. ("No, that's not the best place to buy a $50 set of used Talmud, this is!") Our contributors are out there -- in the community, in the neighborhoods, off the beaten track -- and their choices not only reflect the varied tastes of our staff, but the great diversity of L.A. Jewish life. Year after year, by the way, Los Angeles is still our "Best Jewish City."


Best Places to See Jewish Opera: Los Angeles and Long Beach

Thanks to maestro James Conlon and his "Recovered Voices" project, Los Angeles Opera has become the go-to destination in this country to see fully staged productions of works suppressed by the Nazis. This year's fare included the one-act "The Broken Jug" by Viktor Ullmann, who composed the piece just before he was interned at Terezin (he died in Auschwitz in 1944). Conlon aims to stage one such opera per year to help "right musical wrongs" -- Walter Braunfel's rarely performed "The Birds" is planned for 2009. Meanwhile, the iconoclastic Long Beach Opera had such a successful run with its re-staging of Grigori Frid's "The Diary of Anne Frank" (performed in a parking garage to evoke the claustrophobia of Anne's attic) that a second production was added this month. Los Angeles Opera, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles.(213) 972-8001. Long Beach Opera, 507 Pacific Ave., Long Beach. (562) 432-5934. .

-- Naomi Pfefferman

Best Really Jewish-Themed Plays Now Around Town (or, At Least, Some of the Many)

If you're in the mood for a long weekend of Jewish theater (you'd have to start on a Thursday), check out Jennifer Maisel's "The Last Seder," in which the family patriarch has Alzheimer's, the pregnant lesbian daughter brings her life partner and another daughter shows up with a guy she met at the train station, among other intrigues (at the Greenway Court Theatre through July 27). Then there's Naomi Newman, of San Francisco's acclaimed Traveling Jewish Theatre, who'll play a Holocaust survivor recounting her long life (traversing the 20th century) in Martin Sherman's solo show, "Rose" (among Rose's adventures: visits to a hippie commune and to a West Bank settlement), at the Odyssey Theatre (July 5-Aug 31). "The Accomplices," by former New York Times political reporter Bernard Weinraub, spotlights what the United States government and American Jews did -- and didn't do -- to help Jews fleeing the Nazis, at the Fountain Theatre (July 12-Aug. 24). The satiric "Adam Baum and the Jew Movie," directed by Paul Mazursky, is at the Hayworth Theatre through July 20. Watch these pages for more shows as they hit town. Greenway Court Theatre, 544 N. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 655-7679. Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 477-2055. Fountain Theatre, 5060 Fountain Ave., Los Angeles. (323) 663-1525. Hayworth Theatre, 2509 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 389-9860.

-- NP

Best New Literary Salon:Town Hall's Writers Bloc

A decade ago, Andrea Grossman started Writers Bloc in her Beverly Hills kitchen; over the years, the salon has hosted pop-culture-meets-literati conversations between the likes of Norman Mailer, Elmore Leonard and Erica Jong. This past year, the venerated series merged with Los Angeles' 70-year-old Town Hall Los Angeles program to form (what else?) Town Hall's Writers Bloc series, which has made a splash with authors from Salmon Rushdie to angry Jewish comic Lewis Black. Stay tuned for best-selling author Paul Auster ("Brooklyn Follies") who will talk about his war-themed new book, "Man in the Dark," later this summer. Town Hall Los Angeles, 515 Flower St., Los Angeles.

— NP

Best (Sinfully Rich) Persian-Infused French Bakery: Mignon

When I see a bakery with a French name in the Valley, it's a good bet it's Persian. One example is Mignon Bakery (mignon means cute in French). The aroma of fresh pastries baking and the owner's warm smile make Mignon a delightful stop on a shopping trip to Valley Produce, a favorite market among Israelis. Although there are French items, so far I've focused on the Persian pastries, and all that I've tried have been fresh and of good quality, from saffron-glazed turnovers with almond-cardamom filling to tasty cinnamon-walnut baklava to exotic sweets like cardamom-flavored chickpea balls. There are a variety of Persian cakes and pastries, like delicate Yazdi cupcakes, syrupy fried pastries and gata, a rich round breakfast bread. This is the only place I know to get fresh barbary bread, the long, oval ridged Persian bread. Like baguette, it has a pleasing crust that's most delicious when just baked. If you want some, come early -- they disappear quickly. Try not to eat the whole loaf before you get home! Mignon Bakery, Valley Produce Plaza, 18353 Vanowen St. Suite G, Reseda. (818) 774-9920.

— Faye Levy

Best Place to Learn Persian and Hebrew While Drinking Blended Coffee: The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf

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The L.A.-based Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, whose stores are certified kosher throughout Nevada and Southern California, draws a wide range of customers who enjoy drinking a blended beverage and maybe picking up a new language. At many of the stores, from Pico-Robertson to the Westside to Ventura Boulevard, you can hear Persian-language speakers and Hebrew speakers mingle over mochas. Just plop in a corner and see if you can follow along. As an added bonus, the purple straws and yummy pastries have been joined by challahs, available for order and pickup right at the store. For locations, visit coffeebean.com.

-- Shoshana Lewin

Best Way to Visit the World of Krusty the (Jewish) Clown: The Simpsons Rideat Universal Studios Hollywood

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Homer, Marge, Bart and the rest of the family have recently moved from Springfield to Universal City. The six-minute simulator attraction took the site once occupied by the "Back to the Future" ride -- and completely changed the look of the theme park's upper lot. The ride takes you into the crazy world of Krusty (a.k.a. Herschel Shmoikel Pinkus Yerucham Krustofsky) through a visit to the very low-budget Krustyland. But there's a hitch: Sideshow Bob has escaped from prison and can't wait to get revenge on Krusty and the Simpsons. After riding Krusty's "

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