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Jewish Journal

What do Dennis Prager, Jimmy Carter, Mel Gibson and General Motors have in common?

December 21, 2006 | 7:00 pm

Understanding Prager

Your Dec. 8 edition of The Journal had two prominent headlines regarding recent comments made by Dennis Prager. These headlines stated: "Prager Won't Apologize After Slamming Quran in Congress" and "Prager Opposition to Quran in Congress Rite Draws Fire."

Since I previously read Prager's commentary regarding the new Muslim congressman wanting to use the Quran, instead of the Bible, during his upcoming swearing-in ceremony, it was difficult to reconcile both your headlines and the related article. Nowhere did we see Prager "slam" or "oppose" in a practical sense. Rather, his commentary sought to perpetuate American values for this traditional congressional swearing in ceremony. Our courts also use a similar process to swear in witnesses and assure truthful testimony. Will our court system be next in line?

Your paper was quite transparent in editorializing against, not reporting, Prager's position. Moreover, some of the same Jewish leaders named as Prager's critics have also been at the forefront of keeping religious and Jewish symbols out of our secular society.

In this latter instance, the constitutional separation of church and state argument is invoked. Interesting how they now cloak their argument against Prager with another constitutional position, i.e., the First Amendment.

You also cite an Islamic advocacy group, which vehemently attacks Prager both personally and via his position on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council.

Instead of overreacting to political correctness, we would be better served by pursuing the real facts and premise here.

Steven Fishbein
Sacramento

Talented Mel

I pay tribute to Mel Gibson ... and believe that the word police are alive and well out there. ("Skip Into Mel Gibson's 'Apocalypto,' Now," Dec. 8).

How many of us are innocent of never making a racial or ethnic slur? Because he is who he is, the media goes after him, waiting for him to mess up and nail him. So what -- they are only words. I believe he is a most talented actor and director no matter what anyone says ... and will probably go back and see ["Apocalypto"] again.

J. Sklair
Via e-mail

General Motors

The series, "Hitler's Carmaker," by Edwin Black examines once again the role of Adam Opel AG, GM's German subsidiary, in the period before and during World War II ("Hitler's Carmaker: How General Motors helped jump-start the Third Reich's military machine," Dec. 1).

It has been well documented that, like all German companies, Opel participated in the rebuilding of German industry during the 1930s. As Germany rearmed, Opel sold trucks and other vehicles to the German military, as did all other German vehicle manufacturers.

In independent research supported by GM, historian Henry Ashby Turner Jr. concluded that GM executives in charge of Opel strove to evade Nazi demands to convert the firm's main factory for production of dedicated war material. His book, "General Motors and the Nazis" (Yale University Press, 2005), documents that by mid-1940, soon after the invasion of Poland, the Nazis had taken complete control of operations at Opel.

It was during this later period, from 1940 though 1945, that the Nazis turned to forced labor to bolster Germany's manufacturing industry, and that sanctions against Jews and others grew into the horrors of the Holocaust.

During this period, GM had no role in supporting the Nazi regime. In fact, GM became a key part of the American war effort, without which the Nazis might have remained in power for many years longer General Motors finds the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime abhorrent and among the darkest days of our collective history. General Motors deeply regrets any role the company or its vehicles played in the Nazi era.

While "Hitler's Carmaker" makes for compelling reading, it is not news. It covers a period of history that has been extensively researched. For example, following in-depth investigations in 1999, Opel made a $15 million contribution to the German multicompany Trust Fund Initiative to compensate forced labor workers and their survivors.

Nor does it reflect the General Motors of today, which is firmly committed to basic human rights. These principles, spelled out in GM's Human Rights and Labor Standards, the Global Sullivan Principles and related documents, are proudly supported by the men and women of GM around the globe.

Steven J. Harris
Vice President, Communications
General Motors Corp.

Playing With the Facts

Perhaps President Carter's latest book is not "Mein Kampf" or "Uncle Tom's Cabin," but give his supporters more time to play with the facts ("With Friends Like These..." Dec. 15). For example: The response to [Theodor] Herzl's gentle diplomacy was "Protocols of Zion"; the Palestinian response to Jewish immigration of legally purchased land where the Jews did their own labor, at slave level, were pogroms (called riots); Palestinian Nazification erupted with Hitler's ally in genocide, the grand mufti of Jerusalem, and blossomed with Arab Ph.Ds in Holocaust denial; currently there is mass Nazi education for Palestinian youth.

Don't worry, give Carter's book time.

Meanwhile, I hereby nominate his book for the "Janjaweed Martyrs of the Year" award.

Charles S. Berdiansky
West Hollywood

Vegan Versions

My mouth was watering as I read about Follow Your Heart's annual all-vegetarian Chanukah feast ("Follow Your Heart to a Vegetarian Chanukah Feast," Dec. 15). But are latkes and vegetarian liver really that foreign to us? Indeed, there are tons of vegan dishes that are common Jewish foods, from falafel and hummus to blintzes and vegetarian cholent.

My favorite part about Chanukah and other Jewish holidays is getting together with loved ones and chowing down on the easily vegan versions of virtually all Jewish staples. Not only is it easy to be vegetarian, it's easy to be vegetarian and eat Jewish foods.

Michael Croland
Norfolk, Va.

Correction: The Dec. 15 Journal cover illustration should have been credited to Steve Greenberg. The Journal regrets the error.

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