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Jewish Journal

Letters

June 8, 2006 | 8:00 pm

Ordinary Child
Dear Rabbi Feinstein: Thank you for your article on "Perfectly Imperfect" (May 5). As educators, we wholeheartedly appreciate your position on making space for the ordinary child.

In our experience as day school educators, we struggle with balancing the parents' desires for their child's academic excellence, while supporting each student's individual capabilities. We make space for our students to be three-dimensional, recognizing their strengths and weaknesses, and encouraging them to stretch where they can.

As you so eloquently say, "God offers a process of repair and renewal and return." One of the challenges we encounter with perfection is encouraging students to make their next best choice and to reflect on the lessons of their mistakes. As students acknowledge their mistakes and make choices that increase their wisdom, they are making meaning from their experiences that will enhance their lives.

Kedushah and menschlikheit reside very closely in our hearts and in our teachings with both students and parents. We want our students to hear the voices of empathy, generosity and curiosity as they make positive and healthy choices throughout their lives.

Amy Bryman
Cheryl Hersh, Middle School Principal
Inez Tiger, Middle School Counselor Pressman Academy

Jew-by-Choice
As a convert to Judaism, it was reassuring to read your series of articles on those like me who chose to become Jews ("Did It Stick?" June 2). As a lapsed Catholic with many Jewish friends growing up on Long Island, early on, I was attracted to the ethics and worldly focus of Judaism. Following a course of study at Temple Emanuel in New York City, I converted in 1967, and my first wife and I raised our three children in the Jewish tradition.

In 1992 on the eve of her bat mitzvah, my youngest daughter asked if I would be bar mitzvahed with her. That glorious day came to pass at Wilshire Boulevard Temple, with Rabbi Harvey Fields observing that in the 130-year history of the temple, there was no record of a father and daughter having a b'nai mitzvah. At the party afterward, when Tessa and I greeted everyone, I said that I had checked around the room, and I was the only person who had had a first holy communion and a bar mitzvah.

In my life in Los Angeles with my wife, Wendy, inspired by Rabbi Chaim Seidler-Feller at UCLA and through my work with the Progressive Jewish Alliance, enriched by interfaith activities, Judaism has strengthened and complimented my struggle for civil liberties, human rights, peace and justice.

Stephen F Rohde
Los Angeles

John Fishel
I read with interest recently your column reported by Marc Ballon, concerning John Fishel ("A Private Man," May 26). What he left out in his analysis is John Fischel's relationship with his professional staff.

For me, he was both a role model and a mentor. He provided an opportunity for me to learn a great deal about Jewish communal service, about leadership and dedication to the Jewish people. He was forceful in his ability to set forward a vision for those of us who worked with him concerning his expectations of our performance and his commitment to excellence.

We strived together to work toward a better Los Angeles Jewish community, and we did so under the guiding leadership of a man who dedicated himself toward not only building a stronger Los Angeles community but a stronger Jewish community worldwide.

From these very important core values we took a tremendous amount of inspiration in carrying out our daily activities. He should be commended for all that he has done on behalf of the Jewish community and continues to do.

I know that I would not be in the place that I am today without John Fischel's interest in who I was, what I wanted to achieve and how I could create a path toward my own professional leadership. I am proud to say that I served for eight years as a senior executive under his tutelage, and that today with his help, I am able to serve as a large city executive in the Jewish community of South Palm Beach County.

William S. Bernstein
Boca Raton, Fla.

Mischaracterizations
[Raphael J.] Sonenshein's logic and mischaracterizations undermine his arguments ("Israel: Between Iraq and a Hard Place," May 26). Sonenshein writes, "Wars often start because of such mutual misperceptions."

The first such misperception that could lead to war is that the Bush administration "might even believe that confrontation [with Iran] would increase their public support." Yet he also writes that the Bush administration is "capable of taking action with or without public support."

The second such misperception that could lead to war is that the Iranians "have concluded that the [Bush] administration is so weakened that it can be challenged easily." This may be true, but it's not due to the actions of the Bush administration (no matter how incompetent). Rather, it is due to the constant bombardment by the media (including Sonenshein) attacking the Bush administration as being incompetent.

Israel is facing real dangers. The Journal could be a valuable contributor to real solutions by publishing more articles with serious ideas for debate and less articles for Bush-bashing.

Kenny Laitin
Los Angeles

Pearl Foundation
The fact that the Daniel Pearl Foundation is -- as stated in your June 2 article ("Quartet of Movies to Tell Pearl's Story" -- trying "to address the root causes of his murder" by promoting "cross-cultural understanding" between the Western and Muslim worlds is very sad. Sad because those of us who haven't suffered such a loss cannot imagine the grief suffered by Pearl's parents and how they're trying to deal with it, and equally sad because people of good will in the Western world still haven't grasped that one cannot address the "root causes" of jihadist Islam (meaning to make them stop hating and killing Jews and other infidels) by "journalism, music and innovative communication," any more than Nazism's desire to slaughter Jews and enslave humanity could have been addressed by such means.

Chaim Sisman
Los Angeles

Correction
In the June 2 issue, "Quartet of Movies to Tell Pearl's Story," the Daniel Pearl photo should have been credited to the Daniel Pearl Foundation.

Wandering Jew misquoted Irving Brecher in the story, "A Man for All Seasonings," by Hank Rosenfeld (June 2). Brecher did not say he loved Langer's deli "for their double-baked rye" bread. He said he loved the deli for its pastrami. We regret the error.

 

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