Quantcast

Jewish Journal

Yeladim

by Abby Gilad

January 27, 2005 | 7:00 pm

This week's portion is named for Moses' father-in-law, Yitro. Moses is exhausted because he spends the whole day talking to anyone who needs counseling or judgment. Yitro, who is visiting him, says: "You'll kill yourself if you keep up at this pace. Get some people to help you." And that's exactly what Moses does. Do your parents ever seem too exhausted to pay any attention to you? The best way you can help your parents out is by telling them you understand, that you know how much they love you and you know that they will give you the attention you need as soon as they are able.
Moses took care of 600,000 Jews. Today, there are 13.2 million of us in the whole world. That's still not very many. Here is a list of a few Jewish populations around the world. Can you match the city or country to the amount of Jews who live there? Send your answer to abbygilad@yahoo.com.
Israel 5,000,000
Los Angeles 600,000
India 120
France 360,000
Canada 2,000,000
New York 6,000
Tahiti 600,000
A Jewish Memory
Here is a story written by a sixth-grader.

A few years ago, my dad took me to visit my grandma, Helen, at the nursing home. She was 92, and had had a stroke four years earlier. No one could talk to her much because she was always sleeping. Through the years, she just got worse and worse until she couldn't even open an eyelid. When we got there, it was kind of a shock to me, since I hadn't been there for so long. We finally found Grandma in a wheelchair in the patio. As usual, she was fast asleep. With her pale face and thinning hair, she did not look like the beloved grandmother I used to know. My father told me to talk to her. I tried but she didn't move. I told jokes, laughed, whistled; I even acted out something funny that I had recently seen on TV, but my grandmother stayed still as a rock. My dad saw my impatience, and said sympathetically: "Come on, honey, we can leave now," he said. But I didn't budge. I felt I had a goal to attain, so I wouldn't just let go. "Let me try one last time," I answered. I thought and thought, and just when I couldn't think anymore, I remembered I knew a little Yiddish. A few months ago had been Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Memorial Day. I, together with the rest of my class had sang many Holocaust songs including, "Zog Nit Keyn Mol." I knew Grandma grew up speaking Yiddish with her five sisters in New York, so I gave it one more shot. I sang the song. Surprisingly, it worked. Grandma opened her eyes and smiled. And even though it was only for a brief second, I knew I would treasure that moment forever. I did. Grandma died on Oct. 26, 2003.

Tracker Pixel for Entry

COMMENTS

We welcome your feedback.

Privacy Policy

Your information will not be shared or sold without your consent. Get all the details.

Terms of Service

JewishJournal.com has rules for its commenting community.Get all the details.

Publication

JewishJournal.com reserves the right to use your comment in our weekly print publication.

ADVERTISEMENT
PUT YOUR AD HERE