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Why, Tzipi?

by Noga Gur-Arieh

May 3, 2012 | 11:26 am

Bring in back, bring it back...

My vote for Tzipi livny was my first vote ever. I was 19 when the elections to the Knesset were at their prime. Since it was my first election ever, and the first time I showed any interest in politics, you can be sure I’ve done deep research before going behind the curtain.


Being a young, fresh voter, I decided to go through all the statements of all the different parties (and there are a lot in here) which I felt were relevant for my general beliefs. I didn’t care about previous rumors of corruption or fresh gossip or any type of dirt rival parties presented. I only cared about the issues the party leader tended to take care of, and the party’s general agenda. Kadima, the party which was led by Livny, was still fresh. After rising in 2005 as a pure center party, it felt like the perfect party for me. I don’t have a distinct political point of view. I’m neither right wing or left wing, and I was looking forward to see our country being led by a party which deals with various issues with a clear mind, one issue at a time. As for Livny, she was a woman, and a charismatic one. Her portrait on billboards made me believe in her and in everything she wants to do. She was a true epiphany.  A strong, confident woman, who fits perfectly for the 21st century Israel.


Kadima won the election, but Livny failed to get a proper coalition together. Lacking agreements with several parties, the second leading party, the Likud, took the stand. I really looked up to her by holding on to her beliefs and not caving into small politics. I was convinced that as the head of the opposition, she will correct the Israeli politics for good.
Now, almost four years later, there’s no doubt- Tzipi has disappointed me, and the majority of Israeli voters. The woman we’ve all put our faith in, the former minister of foreign affairs, a politician who always focused on doing her job more than on the publicity, has failed. In three and a half years she did absolutely nothing. The strong woman, who promised everything I could hope for, was probably the quietest head of opposition in a while. Her quitting the government and leaving her job before the next election was the final straw for me. After losing the inner elections in her party to Shaul Mofaz, she was probably so embarrassed she forgot why she is here to begin with. She forgot that making a difference can be done even while not being on top. That one doesn’t necessarily have to be the first on a list to have great impact.


From being at the top, she single-handedly brought herself down. Her leaving the Knesset proves she also believes she has failed us. She knows she has nothing to give, because otherwise she would stay and fight her battles until the last day of duty. With all that being said, I still hope she decides one day to return to the rough world of politics. Surveys show people still have faith in her and hope she will be back, stronger than ever and proving everyone wrong. I hope she does, because all of her political failures, disappointing as they are, are also her strongest point. Throughout the way, she never gave up her integrity, which is hard to find nowadays. I hope she will rise again and correct the wrongs of the past. Tzipi, please take four years, no more, and reunite with the 2009 values. This I hope, and we will be waiting.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

My name is Noga Gur-Arieh, and I’m an Israeli Journalist, currently studying for my B.A degree in Media and Political Science, at Tel Aviv University.

I am very socially...

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