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Election Countdown- Why is Aviv Tzinori voting for Eretz Hadasha?

by Noga Gur-Arieh

January 19, 2013 | 11:50 am

On January 22nd, Israel will vote for its new Knesset, and choose the Prime Minister to lead it. Much unlike the American system, here, we have countless parties with countless ideologies to choose from. Behind the curtain, we will cast our ballot, and choose one party only. The person leading the party which will get the most votes, will become Israel's next Prime Minister. I asked some of my friends to tell me, and you, whom they are planning to vote for, and why. Some knew the answer right away, some are still struggling. Each day, I will post a different column with a different opinion. Take into account that this is merely a taste of all the parties competing for our votes. Today, Aviv Tzinori  will explain her choice of voting Eretz Hadasha.

 

My vote goes to Eretz Hadasha/ Aviv Tzinori
Ever since the big Social Justice protest, we scream out that we've had it. We've had enough with corrupt politicians, with the cutbacks, with demagoguery… We are opposing, waving our arms and legs, and announcing that this can no longer go on. But after two years of doing that, the election time of the year arrives. The best PR artists 'polish' their clients, and tongues turn into swords. Every word that's being said during this time is like a slash of the sword upon a rival's head.
Ha'Likud-Israel Beiteinu VS Habait Hayehudi. Tzipi Livni VS Shelly Yachimovich VS Yair Lapid… The current election campaign seems like one big cloud of personal interests and direct insults, with only one thing missing- The Agenda. The saying: Once upon a time, those who ran for politics were people who had something to say, an opinion of desire for a better Israel. Nowadays, it feels like everything is driven by interests and followed by questions such as: Which hand will you shake secretly? Which 'friends' need you more than you need them? Which ones do you need more?


The feeling of despair from the more senior, 'old timers' politician is probably collective. This feeling, that no matter what we will do, it will all stay the same as the same old politicians, who've been in the Knesset for decades now, will remain there. This feeling of despair leads each one of us to a different place: some choose not to vote, some get scared and follow extremists, some let the current Knesset convince them that change is bad. They tell us that change will be suicidal for Israel. Why are they trying to scare us like that? Why they are trying to prevent us from changing the system? What are they not telling us? Is change even possible?


Eldad Yaniv says it is. Yaniv is the chairperson of "Eretz Hadasha" (New Land) party. I don't know him personally. I heard of him only several times before. He was Netanyahu's assistant, and later Barak's assistant. He has a lot to say. He comes from the inside, he knows the system. He activated the system, and he can also break it.


Yaniv knows what are the critical junctions that must be passed in order for us to become a better Israel. He wants to turn the politics, which we all see as rotten, to something different and new. I am not scared anymore. I stopped believing Netanyahu. I know things can be better. I believe in the power of 'new blood', clean and interests-free, as opposed to the Dinosaurs in the Knesset.


Eretz Hadasha promise to fight the lack of willingness and lack of ability that surround the halls of the Knesset building. According to the polls, Eretz Hadasha has a shot at entering two new Knesset members, and this is a great first step, and already a success. They give me hope for a brighter future.

Aviv is a 24 year-old Communications and Sociology student, currently living in Givat Shmuel.

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