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Jewish Journal

Valley Festival Draws Thousands

by Michael Aushenker

September 11, 2003 | 8:00 pm

It was a sunny day in Woodland Hills -- perhaps a little too sunny -- but the heat did not stop the 11th biennial Los Angeles Jewish Festival from creating some heat of its own.

"More booths, more vendors, more of everything" is how festival co-chair Nancy Parris Moskowitz described this year's gathering, sponsored by The Jewish Federation/Valley Alliance and a host of Jewish organizations and corporate sponsors, which attracted a multiethnic group of some 30,000 people throughout the day. Moskowitz also welcomed the festival's return to the Pierce College campus, where attendees benefited from "good parking, lots of access and lots of shade."

Ken Warner, Valley Alliance president, was proud that the festival's $125,000 price tag "is not costing The Federation any money. We did this by asking businesses to contribute."

In keeping with this year's social action theme, "World Jewry," Becquie Kishineff, who went on a mission to Argentina last November, enlisted the graphic art services of an unemployed Argentine Jew she had met for a special Jewish unity-themed jigsaw puzzle project sponsored by the Valley Alliance.

"He spent hundreds of hours working on it but he didn't want to accept any money," Kishineff said. "There are people out there who still want to give."

And the festival gave its all in reflecting the diversity of Jewish Los Angeles. Among those occupying booths: Assemblyman Paul Koretz (D-West Hollywood) and Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks); organizations and nonprofits of every stripe from the Anti-Defamation League to StandWithUs and Million Mom March; Yiddish and Jewish culture societies; and grass-roots clubs, such as the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Needlework.

"Part of our mission is to have a visible presence in the community," said Bill Rice of GaySantaBarbara.org, which hosted the Gay Cafe alongside food kiosks Klassic Knishes and Kosher Connection.

Judaica and art vendors ranged from a Shop for Israel shuk to local artists. The Main Stage showcased live music all day long, and kids had plenty of activities to choose from -- everything from rock-climbing and Family Stage entertainment, to the Temple Beth Torah of Mar Vista booth, which offered kids a respite from the heat with some storytelling. Keith Levy, director of programs at Congregation B'nai Emet of Simi Valley, showed children such as Abby Leven, 10, of West Hills, how to play the shofar just in time for Rosh Hashanah.

Abby's father, Paul Leven, who also brought his wife, Saralyn, and 12-year-old son, Aaron, summed up the festival's appeal: "We like to see our friends and to check out the booths."

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