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Briefs: West Bank withdrawals coming, Peres says; Israel wants U.S. to stay the course on P.A.

March 8, 2007 | 7:00 pm

West Bank withdrawals coming, Peres says

Israel plans to remove some West Bank settlements according to Shimon Peres.

The Israeli vice premier said Saturday that, while Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's plan to "realign" the West Bank deployment was shelved after last year's Lebanon war, settlement evacuations are still on the agenda.

"Yes, settlements will be removed -- not all the settlements, and I'm not even sure most of the settlements," he told Israel's Channel 2 television, adding that the number of communities evacuated could be in the dozens. "I think that a serious effort will be made to do that which we undertook to do, which is removing settlements." Peres said the Hamas-led Palestinian Authority could affect the scale and pace of the withdrawals by accepting peace talks with Israel.

Israel wants U.S. to stay the course on P.A.

Israel is trying to shore up U.S. objections to the planned Palestinian Authority coalition government. Top aides of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert traveled Sunday to Washington, where they will urge Bush administration officials not to yield to European calls to engage the Hamas-Fatah unity government when it is formed.

The Palestinian Authority power-sharing pact, which was signed in Saudi Arabia last month, contains a vague reference to "respecting" past peace deals with Israel, falling short of Western demands that the Hamas-led government recognize the Jewish state and renounce terrorism. But Israel believes that some European nations are wavering for fear that the Palestinian Authority's continued isolation will harm its president, Mahmoud Abbas, the Fatah leader and a perceived moderate.

Separately, U.S. Under Secretary of the Treasury Stuart Levey was in Israel on Sunday for talks with local officials on the effect of the Western aid embargo on the Palestinian Authority, and whether such measures could also be applied against Iran's nuclear program.

Jordan's King Abdullah wants more U.S. involvement

Jordan's King Abdullah said the United States was not balanced in its handling of the Israeli-Palestinian crisis.

"It is our duty to push this great nation, and others, to take balanced positions and support the peace process," Abdullah told Jordanian television in a weekend interview ahead of a trip to the United States. He said Washington should use its influence on Israel "to prove its transparency to the peoples of the region, and that it is not biased."

Abdullah, whose pro-Western country is considered an important regional broker, suggested that Israel was not displaying sincerity in its efforts to restart peace talks with the Palestinians.

"The main responsibility lies with Israel, which must choose either to remain a prisoner of the mentality of 'Israel the fortress' or to live in peace and stability with its neighbors," he said.

Hungarian political unrest spurs anti-Semitism

Hungary's leader warned of rising anti-Semitism. Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany said in an interview published over the weekend that the hatred of Jews in Hungary has reached new heights since a wave of anti-government protests last year.

"I have to say that there have never been so many anti-Semitic remarks as now," Gyurcsany told Britain's Times newspaper.

Hungary's left-leaning government was disgraced in September after it was revealed to have lied about the economy in order to win the previous election. Gyurcsany said that during the resulting demonstrations, protesters tried to blame Jewish politicians, apparently with the encouragement of right-wing opposition members.

"There is something horrible happening," said Gyurcsany, whose wife is of Jewish descent.

Hadassah receives $75 million for Jerusalem hospital

Hadassah received a $75 million contribution for a new inpatient tower at its Jerusalem hospital. William and Karen Davidson gave the gift on behalf of Guardian Industries Corp. of Auburn Hills, Mich., of which William Davidson is president. Hadassah will name the new facility at the Hadassah Medical Center the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Tower in memory of William Davidson's mother, who was a founder of the organization's Detroit chapter.

"The power of family is truly a binding one, and I feel privileged to be the third generation to support Hadassah's goals and achievements," Davidson said in a statement.

Davidson, who owns several sports teams, including the Detroit Pistons, said he was impressed by the way Hadassah treats patients of all religions and backgrounds. The $210 million inpatient tower will be a 14-story structure with 500 beds, 20 state-of-the-art operating rooms and 50 intensive-care beds. The tower is expected to boost Hadassah's capabilities in many fields, such as cardiology, telemedicine and laparoscopic surgery, and will facilitate the use of advanced robotics and computers.

Minister denies war crimes allegations

An Israeli Cabinet minister denied Egyptian accusations that he was involved in the killing of Egyptian prisoners of war.

Infrastructure Minister Benjamin Ben-Eliezer, a retired army general, said Sunday that his record during the 1967 war with Egypt was spotless. His comments came after some of his former subordinates said in an Israeli documentary that they had killed Egyptian prisoners, a claim that was picked up by the official Cairo newspaper Al-Ahram and prompted calls in the Egyptian Parliament for Ben-Eliezer to be tried for war crimes.

"The commandos under me did not kill Egyptian soldiers," Ben-Eliezer, who is due to visit Egypt later this week, told Yediot Achronot.

"When the commandos encountered POWs from an Egyptian battalion, they gave them food and water."

RJC launches anti-Reform Iraq resolution

The Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) launched an effort opposing the Reform movement's call for withdrawal from Iraq.

"If you or someone you know is a member of the Reform movement, you should know that the movement's leadership is pushing the Executive Committee of the Union for Reform Judaism's Board of Trustees to adopt a dangerous and wrongheaded resolution opposing the U.S. efforts in Iraq," the RJC said in an action alert sent out this week.

It urged RJC members who belong to Reform synagogues to register their protests locally and nationally. "RJC will continue to speak out on this and make it clear that the Union for Reform Judaism does not speak for all Reform Jews or all Jews in general," the RJC said.

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