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Jewish Journal

Layla Lavan 2012 Report

by LW Ben Yechezkiel

July 4, 2012 | 6:54 pm

Layla Lavan had a different wrinkle this year as groups associated with the social protest movement—-which was so large…but not so successful last summer—staging counter events. Some artists and art galleries also declined to participate in reaction to the police treatment of protesters the previous saturday night.

But (literally) the show did go on. With stages with musicians and other performers…and large crowds up and downschild Boulevard. The place was filled with high schoolers making an all nighter of it wandering the streets of Tel Aviv .Apparently all congregated at Gordon Beach to hang and watch the sunrise. (yea just like in NY or LA),

I made by way up to Tsuk Beach in northern Tel Aviv—a beautiful not commercialized beach north of the nemal parallel to Ramat Aviv. It’s a great spot a totally different feel than the main Tel Aviv beaches and a place I have never visited. Amazing this kind of beach could be so close to the cacophony of the beach along the tayelet. Btw believe it or not there are now staff of the city of Tel Aviv who move those playing matkot (that paddle game which is pretty treacherous for the passerby) to a designated area on the beach…and even more amazing the Israelis comply.

But I digress

I got to the outdoor concert at Tsuk Beach a bit late ( 2 am ) to miss the opening act the great Bary Sacharof a top Israeli pop performer who—like many others—has put out an album with traditional themes.The areas was crowded with people of all ages. There was a concession selling beer all night and not a single incident of unruly behavior (yea just like the states)

I did catch one of my favorite Israeli artists Karolina who performs both solo and as part of Habanot Nechama video is here a wonderful female trio you should check out.

The final act pop veteran Dany Sanderson who got his start in Israeli pop music with the group Kaveret (Poogy). The concert closed at sunrise with Sanderson singing one of his most popular Poogy songs and baby boomers and their kids singing and dancing along thrusting their hands in the air screaming Yo Ya. As a fellow baby boomer I remember Poogy songs being favorites many years ago at Young Judaea’s Camp Tel Yehuda..

I grabbed one of the hourly rental bikes in Tel Aviv which you can pick up and drop off at various sites around the city (14 shekel for the day) and rode back on a beautiful part of the bike trail until iI got to the Nemal (port) and grabbed a cup of my coffee at the Aroma along with some very tired high schoolers. I then jumped on one of the sheruts which serve as a bus alternative to crash at my friend’s (an ex UCLA shaliach) in the bohemian/industrial Florentin district to crash a bit before heading back to Jerusalem. My fellow passengers on the sherut were a group of high school girls who apparently had come in (unaccompanied) to Tel Aviv for the night from Afula (!) (the cultural equivalent of travelling from Kansas to Manhattan)..yea just like in the states.

here’s the video of the same song by the children of the baby boomers

Yes it was a chavaya.

a chavaya.

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The Chavaya Experience.

Yes, Hebrew speakers I know the title is redundant…aval kacha zeh Chavaya is a Hebrew word that literally translated means experience. But at least...

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