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Jewish Journal

Taking the Schmaltz Out of Our Food

by Beverly Levitt

September 13, 2001 | 8:00 pm

At sundown on Monday we usher in the happiest day of our calendar, Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year. For the next 10 days we'll be called upon to reexamine our lives -- to wake up and not only smell the roses, but plant them for other people to enjoy.

The Days of Awe end at sundown on the holiest day of the year, Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, when we'll spend the day in temple fasting and praying. Our sundown to sundown fast brings us agony and ecstasy as we internalize how fleeting life is, promise to make amends for acts we're not proud of, realize we have a whole new year ahead of us to make a difference.

As we hurriedly leave the temple with visions of chopped liver, lokshen kugel and our beloved cheese blintzes dancing in our heads, we know it's just a matter of moments before we can eat.

Lately though, we've had to rethink this. Though it's a beloved family tradition to break the fast with our favorite Ashkenazi dishes, we also know they contain ingredients that top the cardiologist's list of no-no's -- red meat, schmaltz, cottage cheese, sour cream and butter. Fat, fat and more fat.

In response, creative Jewish cooks have been hard at work adapting these recipes. And, as rabbi and cookbook author Gil Marks says, with a laugh, "Healthy Jewish cooking is no longer an oxymoron."

Marks modifies traditional holiday recipes in "The World of Jewish Entertaining" (Simon & Schuster, 1998). He uses meat sparingly, as a flavoring instead of the main event. He also uses recipes from the Sephardim, who migrated to areas as diverse as North and South Africa, the Middle East, India and later to the Mediterranean countries of Spain, Italy, Portugal, Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey. Their cuisine revolved around the three main ingredients mentioned in the Bible: grains, wine and olive oil.

As for our traditional Ashkenazi delicacies, which nourish our souls more than our bodies, Marks substitutes yogurt for sour cream in blintzes, kugels and borsht, uses olive oil instead of schmaltz for chopped liver -- or even eliminates liver altogether in favor of a pate of mushrooms, onions and string beans. Instead of stuffing chicken with oil-soaked bread cubes, he suggests apples and spinach, traditional ingredients for the New Year.

Marks has also gone where few men have ventured before him -- perfecting a recipe for whole wheat challah, which subtracts eggs and extra fat, adding whole wheat, wheat germ and honey for moisture. He sweetens dishes with fruits instead of sugar. But, he cautions, "Be smart with substitutions. Don't serve a dish just because it's low fat. Experiment until you're happy with the flavor."

Since we're trying to modify tradition, not break it, instead of asking a Jewish matriarch for our Break the Fast menu, we went to premier Jewish chef and caterer, David Rubell, who serves the Break the Fast Meal at Temple Shalom for the Arts in Los Angeles.

Rubell learned about "food from the old country" from the closest person to him -- his Nana Willner. "On Yom Kippur, she'd shine," he says. "Because she knew she'd be in shul all day, and exhausted when she got home, she developed a technique that I, as a caterer, use to this day.

"Nana was meticulously organized. The day before Yom Kippur, she'd assemble her ingredients, then slice, dice, and, in some cases, partially cook, then refrigerate the dishes. When she got home from shul, she'd finish each recipe and have it on the table -- piping hot or ice cold -- almost instantly. Nothing ever tasted like it had been sitting in the refrigerator all night. Everything was always delicious.

"I learned another lesson from Nana," Rubell says slyly. "Seltzer water in matzah balls. 'Most people use fat, eggs and too much matzo meal,' she'd scoff, in her inimitable Russian-Brooklyn accent. 'And they handle them too much. Of course, they're like lead.'

"Not my Nana's," he says. "Hers were always light as a feather. I used to laugh, because when we'd eat at my other grandma's, Nana Rubell, her matzah balls were like sinkers. We never told her our secret.

"When Nana made blintzes she'd insist on filling them with pot cheese. When she couldn't find it, she'd substitute Farmer's. Of course, she'd grouse every time. The mystery ingredient in her sweet blintzes was salt. Just like the infamous spoonful of sugar, 'A pinch of salt makes us remember who we are and where we came from,' she'd tell me. 'Life is not all sweetness and honey. Never forget that!' This is especially relevant on Yom Kippur, which is all about that little dose of reality," Rubell muses.

As Rubell grew older and started working as a professional chef, his beloved nana took sick with pancreatic cancer. He trudged down to Florida and cooked her all of her favorite meals. "That meant more to her than anything," he says, his eyes welling up. It made him start thinking about lightening the traditional Jewish foods he'd grown up with.

Today when he's doing a menu, he starts with the dishes she'd taught him, then replaces them with healthier variations.

For example, Rubell replaces the customary sour cream topping for the blintzes with fresh berry compote. Instead of sweet, heavy babkas that "will lay in your stomach for the next three days," he'll serve a fresh peach cobbler. Since tuna salad with gobs of mayo is a staple on many buffets, Rubell created savory Chinese Seared Ahi Tuna Salad. Instead of the traditional sweet, heavy kugel, he'll serve a vegetable frittata. According to Rubell, "We never forget our cultural traditions, but we're reinterpreting them for today's healthier lifestyles."

Have a happy and healthy New Year!






Recipes for taking out the Schmaltz from Jewish food

All recipes from Chef David Rubell.

Smoked Whitefish Salad (A favorite of Theodore Bikel's)
Smoked Trout may be substituted for the whitefish.

1 smoked whitefish, approximately 2 lbs., carefully boned
1/3-1/2 cup mayonnaise (low fat or regular)
1 bunch scallions, green part only, sliced thin


Pulse all ingredients in food processor until just smooth. Refrigerate. Serve as appetizer with crackers or challah, or as first course with baby greens and tomato.

Serves 8 to 10.

Chinese Seared Ahi Tuna Salad with Mango

1/2 cup soy sauce
1 teaspoon wasabi
1 1/2 pounds, fresh ahi tuna
1/4 cup canola oil
1 One-pound package wonton skins
1 quart canola oil for frying noodles
1/2 Six-ounce package saifun or dry
bean thread noodles, broken in half
1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
1/4 cup dry roasted, salted cashews
1 head iceberg lettuce, sliced very thin
1/2 head Savoy cabbage, sliced very thin
2 bunches green onion, green part sliced diagonally
2 mangoes, peeled and sliced thin

For Dressing:
2 ounces pickled ginger
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 bunch scallions, white only
1 cup seasoned rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup Chinese sweet and sour sauce
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup toasted sesame oil



Mix together soy sauce and wasabi. Marinate tuna in mixture for 20 minutes. Sear tuna in hot, nonstick skillet with 1/4 cup oil approximately 1 minute per side. Refrigerate immediately after removing tuna from heat. Allow to cool at least 1/2 hour before slicing for salad. Slice tuna into 1 1/2 inch pieces, reserving odd sizes to incorporate into body of salad.

Slice wonton skins into very thin julienne strips. Fry noodles in very hot oil in 3 separate batches, so as not to decrease oil temperature. Cook noodles approximately 1 minute, tossing constantly. Drain on paper towels.

Bring oil back to temperature. Fry saifun noodle halves separately from each other as they expand rapidly upon hitting the oil. Turn once, remove from pot; drain on paper towel. Repeat until all noodles are fried.

For Dressing:

Place all ingredients in blender and mix for 3 minutes.

To Assemble:

Reserving small handful of wonton noodles and nuts for garnish, toss with dressing, lettuce, cabbage, green onion, nuts, saifun and wonton noodles, and odd pieces of tuna. Place on platter; arrange remaining tuna slices and mangoes decoratively around salad. Top with additional noodles and nuts.

Serves 8 to 10.

Holiday Cheese Blintzes Topped with a Trio of Fresh Berries

(This recipe is from David's beloved Nana Willner, who told him, "With every bit of sugar, you need a pinch of salt.")

The pancakes may be purchased ready-made in the produce section of the supermarket.



For the pancake batter:3 cups milk
1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
5 eggs
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup melted butter
For Filling:
1 pound hoop cheese
1 pound pot or farmer cheese
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Pinch of salt
For Berries:
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup fresh raspberries
1 cup fresh blueberries


To Make Pancakes:

Add milk to flour, beating vigorously with wire whisk. In separate bowl, whisk together eggs, salt and sugar; add butter, whisk until smooth. Combine both mixtures. Beat until smooth. Put small amount of oil or butter on a paper towel. Lightly wipe surface of an 8-inch nonstick pan. Pour 1/4 cup of batter into pan. Rotate pan until entire surface is thinly covered with batter. Cook over medium heat until edges are slightly browned, turn over with spatula; cook for a minute on other side. Stack pancakes until ready to use.

To Make Filling:

Using electric mixer or by hand, blend cheeses with vanilla, sugar, cinnamon and salt.

To Make Fruit Topping:

Combine strawberries, sugar and vanilla. Barely bring to boil; shut off flame. Transfer to dish; allow to cool. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Just before serving add raspberries and blueberries.

To Assemble Blintzes:

Place pancake on dish; put 2 heaping tablespoons of filling on bottom half; fold edge of pancake over filling; tuck in sides so that it's trapped and roll up into a slim roll. Sauté in lightly buttered non-stick skillet until golden brown. Transfer to baking dish; cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. When ready to serve, remove wrap, heat in oven at 350 for 10 to 15 minutes. Top with berry compote. If desired, sprinkle with powdered sugar.

Makes: 20 to 24 full-size blintzes.

Fresh Peach Cobbler

For Peaches:

8-10 medium peaches, peeled and sliced
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Thoroughly mix together the peaches, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and cornstarch. Place in an unbuttered enameled or glass baking pan. Store in refrigerator until ready to use.
For Topping:
1/4 pound sweet butter, cut into very small pieces
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup chopped pecans


Combine butter, sugar, cinnamon, flour, and pecans, being careful not to over mix. Place topping in plastic bag and refrigerate.

Take peaches and topping out of refrigerator. Bring to room temperature. Crumble topping on peaches. Bake at 350 for 45 minutes or until bubbling and golden brown. Serves 8 to 10.

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