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Jewish Journal

Arts in L.A. Calendar June—August

by Dikla Kadosh and Danielle Berrin

June 12, 2008 | 2:32 pm

JUNE

Thu., June 12
"The Pixar Touch: The Making of a Company." The ragtag band of tech-geeks who created such enormously successful hits as "Toy Story," "Finding Nemo" and "Ratatouille" are dissected and discussed in David A. Price's book about the high-minded company and its rags-to-riches success in filmmaking. At his appearance, Price will share behind-the-scenes stories about the animation studio dreamed up during a power lunch. 7:30 p.m. Free. Barnes and Noble, 1201 Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica. (310) 260-9110. http://www.bn.com.

Sat., June 14
Beastly Ball at the Los Angeles Zoo. Monkeys and hippos and tigers, oh my! The Greater Los Angeles Zoo Association (GLAZA) is, for the 38th year in a row, throwing its annual animal-filled shebang in support of the educational and conservation of endangered animal programs subsidized and run by the Los Angeles Zoo. No small get-together, GLAZA's event is expected to be one of the hottest parties of the year, including special tours of the zoo, high-end catering, various forms of live musical entertainment and a silent auction with phenomenal items. Ever wonder what really happens in the jungle at night? Here is your chance to find out! 6 p.m. $1,000. Los Angeles Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, Los Angeles. (323) 644-4708. http://lazoo.org/calendar.

Sat., June 14
Toy Theatre Festival at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. Devoted to giving all genres of stimulating art a place to shine, the Walt Disney Concert Hall is hosting a festival recognizing the talents of numerous international toy puppeteers. A delightful treat for both adults and children, Toy Theatre is a production that encompasses two-dimensional rod puppets in mini-theatres that date back to the early 19th century. Adaptations of such classics as "Alice in Wonderland" are only a few of the many enthralling performances that will be taking place over the course of this two-day event. 10 a.m-6 p.m. Through June 15. Free. Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. (213) 972-8500. http://www.musiccenter.org.

Mon., June 16
Silverdocs: AFI/Discovery Channel Documentary Festival. With documentaries becoming some of the most talked-about films on the silver screen today, the Silverdocs festival is one of the hottest film fests in town. This year's opening-night film, "All Together Now," follows the powerful panoply of creative talent that makes up the Cirque du Soleil production of "Love" at the Mirage in Las Vegas. The closing-night film, "Theater of War," also takes a look at the behind-the-scenes creation of a different theatrical production -- The Public Theater's 2006 performance of Bertolt Brecht's anti-war play "Mother Courage and Her Children" starring Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline. Sandwiched between these two films are many other screen-worthy documentaries. Through June 23. $10 (general admission). For a full listing of films, visit http://www.silverdocs.com.

Tue., June 17
"The Body Has a Mind of Its Own." Mother-and-son science writing duo, Sandra and Matt Blakeslee, will explore how the brain connects with your body parts, movements, space, actions and emotions of others during the ALOUD Science Series on Seeing and Being. Find out how the brain directly links to your body's health and susceptibility to disease. Engage in conversation with science writer and author Margaret Wertheim on how your mind knows where your body ends and the outside world begins. Tue. 7 p.m. Free. Mark Taper Auditorium at Los Angeles Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles. (310) 657-5511. http://www.lfla.org/aloud.

Wed., June 25
"Zocalo at the Skirball: The Oracle in the Gut." New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer will discuss surprising and fascinating research that makes E. coli more than just a deadly bacteria in fast food. The Skirball hosts the popular Los Angeles cultural forum, Zocalo, in this discussion of how the Escherichia coli microbe has had a significant role in the history of biology and continues to advance the search for life-saving medicine, clean fuel and a greater understanding of our own genetic makeup. The lecture, subtitled "E. Coli and the Meaning of Life," is part of a quarterly Zocalo at the Skirball series of engaging expert-led talks on some of today's most pressing subjects. 7:30 p.m. Free. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. R.S.V.P. strongly recommended. (213) 403-0416. http://www.zocalola.org.

Fri., June 27
"American Tales." Mark Twain and Herman Melville, two of the most notable writers in American history, will be brought to life in a musical performance, "American Tales," directed by Thor Steingraber. Los Angeles' Classical Theater Ensemble, the Antaeus Company, is kicking off this year's eight-week ClassicFest with "The Loves of Alonzo Fitz Clarence and Rosannah Ethelton," an adaptation of Twain's comic look at the telephone -- one of the world's most valuable inventions. Meeting by chance through crossed telephone lines, Alonzo from Maine and Rosannah from California develop an instant love connection. Playing off broken and mended connections, "American Tales" brings in Melville's tragic story, "Bartleby the Scrivener." Catch the play's world premiere along with workshops and readings of classic plays featured throughout the festival. 8 p.m. Fri. and Sat. Through August 17. $25. Deaf West Theatre, 5112 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. (818) 762-2773. http://www.deafwest.org.

Sat., June 28
"Cover Version." This innovative exhibition is the result of a challenge New York-based artist Timothy Hull posed to 20 other artists from around the country: design the cover of your favorite book. Turning the aphorism "Don't judge a book by its cover" on its ear, this clever analysis demonstrates quite the opposite -- that a book's cover is actually indicative of its emotional and intellectual resonance and becomes something of a cultural icon. In the same vein as musicians reinterpreting canonical songs by "covering" them, these artists reify and re-imagine the cultural import of such classics as "To the Lighthouse" by Virginia Woolf, "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville and "The Book of Mormon," among others. 6 -9 p.m. (opening reception), 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (Tue.-Sat.). Through Aug. 10. Free. Taylor De Cordoba, 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. (310) 559-9156. http://www.taylordecordoba.com.

Sat., June 28
Heidi Duckler Collage Dance Theatre: "A Guide to an Exhibitionist." Triple-billed as a gallery opening, live performance and party, Duckler's latest site-specific work explores nudity, still-life and the colors framing the space in a performance that ponders the relationship between artist, audience and the physical space in which these three elements intimately collide. 7 p.m. (performances every 30 minutes until 9 p.m.) $25 (includes wine and cheese reception). Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, 6522 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. (818) 784-8669. http://www.collagedancetheatre.org. Tracker Pixel for Entry

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