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Jewish Journal

Sacramento PBS TV affiliate won’t run anti-Semitism documentary

by Joe Eskenazi

January 18, 2007 | 7:00 pm

David Hosley thinks a scene in which a group of devious Jews slash the throat of a young boy in a ritual slaughter to cull his blood for Passover matzah is not the type of thing that should be shown on television. Yitzhak Santis thinks it's exactly what we should be seeing. Santis is the director of Middle Eastern affairs for the San Francisco-based Jewish Community Relations Council. But Hosley is the general manager of a TV station, the PBS affiliate KVIE in Sacramento. So his word goes.

Hosley passed on running the documentary, "Anti-Semitism in the 21st Century: The Resurgence," which most Public Broadcasting stations ran in early January, including Los Angeles' KCET, which ran it on Jan. 8. The film, narrated by Judy Woodruff, provides a history of the hatred of Jews in the Christian West and Muslim East, accompanied by historical cartoons depicting the Jew as "Christ killer," bloodsucker, ravisher of virgins and plotter of world domination.

Hosley defended his decision, which he said was a difficult one and came only after input from a board of station employees, professors and local religious leaders, including a rabbi, imam and Christian ministers.

"I am interested in the topic, but I'm looking for a program that lives up to its title and is well made," said Hosley, a documentary filmmaker himself and the station's general manager for the past eight years.

Hosley said the film, produced by Andrew Goldberg, was journalistically problematic. He claimed that its rapid cuts and interviews with unseen, off-screen questioners left it unclear if the young Arabs being questioned were stating their heartfelt opinions or repeating stories they'd heard. He also complained that the film spent far too long revisiting the history of European anti-Semitism in the 20th century. As for the ritual slaughter scene -- an excerpt from a Syrian TV drama -- he and his panel felt it was blunt, gory and the message could have been made without the depiction of a boy's throat being slashed.

Hosley said his panel told him the film would do "more harm than good" for the relationships among Sacramento's various religious groups.

"I'm very familiar with this program and I couldn't disagree more," said Santis of Hosley's argument. "If you really want to understand the incitement that is being made in Arab and Muslim media, the fact that it is so dramatic and gruesome really demonstrates the level of demonization of Jews that's going on. I have a copy of that [clip] and I've shown it to audiences here and people do close their eyes and I have heard gasps.

"I use it as a wake-up call," Santis said. "This is using 21st century technology to perpetuate the blood libel and people should be made aware of that."

Along with a bevy of letters both supporting and denouncing the documentary, PBS ombudsman Michael Getler wrote a largely supportive entry on behalf of "Anti-Semitism" on the PBS Web site.

"This struck me as just the thing Public TV ought to be doing," he wrote in a Thursday, Jan. 11 posting on PBS.org. "It is unlikely that any diverse audience will ever say that you got this subject just right, but producers need to take a shot at it. Its value, I thought, was in explaining the evolution of anti-Semitism, the original Christian and European role and the differences with Islam, and in exposing to American audiences the kind of hate-filled imagery about Jews that is broadcast and publicly stated in many Arab countries that Americans are unaware of and that the American media rarely captures and broadcasts if they see it."

Hosley said he that it was far from a rebellious act to not run the documentary, as each national program offered is presented at the discretion of the individual affiliate. Hosley estimates he's rejected more than 100 hours of nonrequired programming over the past year. And of the roughly 50 largest PBS affiliates, 18 did not run "Anti-Semitism" in the time slot PBS central had earmarked for it, if at all.

In place of "Anti-Semitism" Hosley ran a documentary about America's oil dependence and the nation's relationship with oil-producing nations.

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