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Jewish Journal

Righteous Anger Fuels ‘Auschwitz’

by Michael Berenbaum

October 14, 2004 | 8:00 pm

"Escaping Auschwitz: A Culture of Forgetting" by Ruth Linn (Cornell University Press, $20).

There is a fierce anger at the core of Ruth Linn's work, the anger of a woman who suddenly and irrefutably discovers that the story she has been told by her Israeli teachers, Israeli society and Israeli culture from childhood onward regarding the Holocaust is but a partial narrative. Her teachers selected materials from the events of Holocaust history to fortify Zionist ideology, to reinforce the importance of Israel and to indoctrinate a new generation. This unraveling of her seemingly naïve trust in her elders revolves around one of the truly important and fascinating events of the Holocaust.

On April 7, 1944, two men, Rudolph Vrba (Walter Rosenberg) and Alfred Wetzler, escaped from Auschwitz and made their way to Slovakia. There, with the help of the Jewish Working Group, they wrote a report, complete with maps, detailing what had occurred at Auschwitz over the past two years and the plans -- soon to be realized -- for the deportation of Hungarian Jews, who were deported en mass only weeks thereafter. Their report made its way from Slovakia to Hungary, where Hungarian Jewish leaders had a clear idea of what indeed was happening at Auschwitz -- mass murder -- before the deportations. Those leaders chose not to share this information with ordinary Hungarian Jews who reported for the trains not knowing that "resettlement in the East" was deportation to death factories and who didn't know what Auschwitz was.

As Elie Wiesel wrote in his memoir "Night": "Auschwitz, we had never heard the name."

Many Hungarian Jews, young and old, echo his statement. Vrba's work has been translated into many languages, but not into Hebrew until 1999. Why? Vrba had not been honored by Israel until he received a doctorate honoris causa from the University of Haifa due to Linn's initiative. Why?

The story of Vrba is well-known in the West. Claude Lanzmann interviewed him at length in his classic film "Shoah." I personally published the Vrba-Wetzler Report in my collection of Holocaust documents "Witness to the Holocaust," and his report formed a centerpiece of "Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp" (Indiana University, 1998), which I co-edited with Israel Gutman, and "Bombing of Auschwitz: Should the Allies Have Attempted It" (St. Martins, 2000), which I co-edited with Michael Neufeld, based on an international conference held at the Air and Space Museum honoring the opening of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 1993. Vrba was a featured speaker at a 1994 conference on Hungarian Jewry and his words from the Lanzmann interview are permanently inscribed in the Museum's exhibition at a pivotal point just when one exits the box car. They are nothing less than poetic.

There was a place called the ramp where trains with Jews were coming in.

They were coming day and night,

Sometimes one per day and sometimes five per day

From all sorts of places in the world.

I worked there from August 18, 1942 to June 7, 1943.

I saw those transports rolling one after another,

And I have seen at least 200 of them in this position.

Constantly, people from the heart of Europe were disappearing,

And they were arriving to the same place,

With the same ignorance of the fate of the previous transport.

I knew that within a couple of hours after they arrived there 90 percent would be gassed.

Linn's anger, however justified, seems quite innocent and quite naïve. For decades now, a new generation of Israeli historians have challenged the "preferred narrative" -- to use the term developed by Edward Linenthal in his masterful work "Preserving History: The Struggle to Create America's Holocaust Memorial" -- developed by earlier historians who sought to present the past in a manner that is conducive to creating a national future. If anything, the historian that Linn criticizes so intensely, Yehuda Bauer (and to a lesser extent Gutman), has been more open and more willing to stray from the Zionist historiography than the generational that preceded him.

The Psalmist proclaimed: "By the Rivers of Babylon we sat and we wept as we remembered Zion."

The place from which we remember an event shapes the manner in which it is recalled.

For the past two decades, the divergence of national historiography relating to the Holocaust has been the subject of intense historical scrutiny in Germany, Austria, the United States, France, Israel, Sweden and Switzerland. In the 15 years since the demise of communism and the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, the countries of Eastern Europe -- Poland and Hungary in particular -- have rewritten their history of the Holocaust to better serve a free people and to better comport with the evidence. Even as this review is being written, Romania is going through that agonizing task as an international commission -- chaired by Wiesel and featuring the work of Radu Ioanid, a Romanian immigrant to the United States -- investigates Romania's role in killing its Jews.

Anger has its place. Linn shakes up the Israeli status quo. She reminds us -- within months of the opening of the new Yad Vashem Museum that will retell the story of the Holocaust to a new generation of Israelis who now are more than a 60 years from the event -- that the Israeli perspective, however important, is limited and must be balanced by other presentations of the very same history. Linn points out that the decision not to translate certain books into Hebrew such as Vrba's memoirs, Hilberg's masterpiece "The Destruction of the European Jews" (Holmes and Meier, 1985) and Hannah Arendt's "Eichmann in Jerusalem" (Penguin, 1994) limits what an Israeli public can understand of the Holocaust. Still, to a younger generation of Israelis whose English is fluent -- and to Israeli scholars who want to make their reputation by writing in English for the international community -- there is a press to present a broader history.

Her role in understanding the importance of the Vrba report is also limited. She does not seem to know the way in which it changed a June decision of the Jewish Agency in Jerusalem not to press for the bombing of Auschwitz since that would result in the death of innocent Jewish non-combatants incarcerated there. Yet one month later in London, Moshe Shertok (later Sharret) and Chaim Weizmann were pressing for the bombing and secured the support of Winston Churchill who told Anthony Eden "get what you can out of the Air Force and invoke my name if necessary." She also does not seem to know the role that it played in the U.S. War Refugee Board forwarding a request to bomb Auschwitz to the War Department, which led to the famed -- infamous -- reply by John J. McCloy in August 1944. The full text of the report was not available in the United States until November.

The work is interesting. Her passion is genuine. Her disappointment is apparent throughout. Righteous anger fuels her work, righteous anger, but still limited learning.

Michael Berenbaum is director of the Sigi Ziering Institute and the co-editor of "The Bombing of Auschwitz: Should the Allies Have Attempted It?"

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