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Jewish Journal

Irreverent Stories You Haven’t Heard

by Amy Klein

July 19, 2006 | 8:00 pm

"All your stories are the same," a British girl in an MFA creative writing program tells the Jewish students in one of the short stories in Elisa Albert's new collection, "How This Night Is Different" (Free Press, $18). "I just feel like I read the same stories over and over again from you guys. They're great and all, but...."

The unspoken "but" is: Why are there so many young, hip Jews writing fiction that irreverently pokes fun at their heritage?

Albert, for example calls herself a "lobotomized Philip Roth writing chick lit" in the above MFA story, which, incidentally, is a fictional letter penned to Roth offering him the chance to impregnate her. But Albert, like other sardonic Jewish short story writers, is probably closer to the next millennium's version of Roth and Woody Allen. Instead of portraying an overwrought Jewish mother and other now-familiar Jewish stereotypes, Albert uses Judaism as a setting for mostly secular characters to air their grievances with each other, or themselves.

Judaism here is a Yom Kippur meal, where one sibling has had an abortion and another has an eating disorder. It's a bris, where the mother doesn't want to give up her baby to the mohel (whom the uncle calls "Shaky McSnips"). It's a themed bat mitzvah, where the aunt gets stoned in the bathroom with her niece's friends while pondering the state of her own shaky marriage.

In short, these are stories about the next generation of Jews -- Jews well-versed enough in their culture to throw around references to Camp Ramah and the search for chametz and Ba'al Teshuvas, but they are so comfortable with it that they have no problem tearing it apart.

"What the f-- is your neshama?" Miri asks her best friend Rachel, watching her prepare to cut her hair off before her religious wedding.

The neshama -- the one Rachel is saving in the story "So Long" -- is the Jewish soul. And the soul of these 10 stories is that Jewish characters find, perhaps, a sense of identity in their Jewishness, but not necessarily any particular spiritual meaning.

"How This Night Is Different," and other in-your-face expressions of Jewish culture like the popular Heeb magazine, is this generation's attempt to connect to their heritage, and connect even while they mock.

If sometimes they go too far, if at times they offend, they still expect to be part of the cultural dialogue. As Debra, the convert looking for a shul in Lisbon in the story "When You Say You're a Jew," muses: "A Jew could do that, find a home anywhere in the world with other Jews. Wasn't that the point of the entire freakin' deal?"

Elisa Albert will be giving reading Sunday, July 23 at 2 p.m. at Dutton's, 11975 San Vicente Blvd., Brentwood; Tuesday, July 25 at 7:30 p.m. at Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., Los Feliz; and Wednesday, July 26, at 7 p.m. at Borders Books and Music, 6510 Canoga Ave., Canoga Park. On Friday, June 28, at 7 p.m., she will be in Santa Monica as part of the ATID/Sinai Temple's Shabbat at Home program for young professionals. To R.S.V.P., call (310) 481-3244.

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