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JewishJournal.com

November 24, 2005

Why a Novel?

http://www.jewishjournal.com/arts/article/why_a_novel_20051125

"The Other Shulman" by Alan Zweibel (Villard, $23.95).

I write. This is what I do. I'm a professional comedy writer. My job is to sit in a room with my vocabulary, select words and put them in an order that will not only hold your interest but also, hopefully, make you laugh. It's treacherous work. Not that it requires heavy lifting or driving at breakneck speeds, but it is equally dangerous, as one misplaced word has the power to permanently affect the life of a character you've created. For example, the errant word in the following sentence, "Harvey is not dead so they will have a funeral and bury him" could conceivably alter the fate of Harvey who may very well have preferred to remain above ground until he was, indeed, dead.

Writing is said to be a lonely business, solitary in the task to fill up so many empty pages. And before I decided to try my hand at writing my autobiographical novel, "The Other Shulman," I'll confess I had fears about such an undertaking. Through the years, I'd been fortunate. Television and movie writing are comparatively social situations involving groups of similarly minded people pooling their talents to produce a script. This was my life during my years at "Saturday Night Live" and "It's Garry Shandling's Show": funny people sit around a table, joke, eat pizza till all hours, share tales about their own childhoods or weekends, and the synergy ultimately results in a product that reflects the collective sensibilities of everyone involved. And my collaboration with Billy Crystal on his play, "700 Sundays," where I helped my good friend create a Broadway show about his family, was an exhilarating experience because the continual flow of dialogue between us made time fly by and the production that much richer.

But a novel? Why, pray tell? By definition it's the loneliest of all writing ventures. No one to talk to. No diversions except for the ones that you yourself create -- like going to the movies or offering to clean your neighbor's garage -- activities that have a tendency to impede the writing process. In television, the discipline is imposed. They're letting the audience in at 11 and we go on the air at 11:30 so there had better be a script or else the cast will be on screen with absolutely nothing to say. Deadlines. While writers dread them, they are secretly grateful that they force us to actually sit down and write. But with a novel it's different. More lax. Let's face it, Margaret Mitchell, who reputedly took 10 years to write "Gone With the Wind," was very fortunate that an audience wasn't sitting in a studio waiting for her to complete her work, because my guess is that they would've grown a tad cranky after a while.

But that's also the attraction of novel writing, for it allows the author time to wander within the pages he's writing. To explore the world he's creating and discover the hidden virtues it may offer. To probe deep into the lives and psyches of his newly formed characters and grant them the freedom to go places and say things that the writer may never have even considered before he got to know them better. Meandering. Writing a novel is very much about the side trips that television, movies and even stage plays cannot take because the constrictions of time and space in those other media do not allow for such tangents. But in a book, the author has the luxury of stepping away from his story and wandering for awhile -- to a flashback, a personal philosophy, or even a two-page description of the shoes a character is wearing -- before finding his way back to the story.

In my novel, "The Other Shulman," I've created a chubby, middle-aged character who takes inventory of his life as he runs through his old neighborhoods during the New York City Marathon. He is able to revisit long-forgotten memories, examine the choices he made, the people he knew, his relationship with God, and, in effect, take a look at what made him the person he is today and what he would have to do to get out of the rut his business and his marriage are in. It is a circuitous journey that I believed would be best served in the form of a novel.

The process was incredibly therapeutic, as the book is quite personal. It took me three years to write. And now I am promoting it at Jewish book fairs because I love talking to groups of book lovers. Also because it will, at long last, get me out of the house.

On Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. Alan Zweibel will sign "The Other Shulman" at Temple Beth Israel as part of the Jewish Book Festival of the Jewish Federation of the San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys, co-sponsored by The Jewish Journal. 3033 N. Towne Ave., Pomona. For more information, call (626) 332-0700.

On Dec. 4 at 9:30 a.m. Zweibel will be speaking at Sinai Temple's People of the Book Breakfast. $18-$25. 10400 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles. For more information, call (310) 481-3217.

An original Saturday Night Live writer, Alan Zweibel has won numerous Emmy and Writers Guild awards for his work in television, which also includes It's Garry Shandling's Show (which he co-created), PBS's Great Performances, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.? In addition to his novel, he recently released a children's book entitled Our Tree Named Steve and collaborated with Billy Crystal on the Tony award-winning stage show 700 Sundays.

 

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