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JewishJournal.com

November 2, 2006

Rainbow-haired couturier takes fashion fun seriously

http://www.jewishjournal.com/la_woman/article/rainbowhaired_couturier_takes_fashion_fun_seriously_20061103

Her natural hair color is brown, but Nony Tochterman hasn't shown her roots in about 20 years. These days it's a bubblegum pink, and in the past she's tressed herself in Skittles hues, including green, blonde, orange, purple, fuchsia and lavender. Color, after all, is a lot of what the 40-year-old fashion designer is about. Her line is called House of Petro Zillia. Named after the Hebrew word for parsley, it is a perfect moniker for her design aesthetic, which takes fun seriously.

"I'm a colorful person," Tochterman said. "I like color; I like texture; I like mixing things together. I think my customer is a sophisticated, ageless, confident woman."

Such women have found Tochterman's clothing in upscale boutiques since the company's inception in 1996, but Tochterman says a store of her own "has been in my head for years." This month, she and her husband and business partner, Yosi Drori, celebrate the grand opening of a flagship store in the trendy strip of West Third Street, between La Cienega Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue.

"The store is not just about my clothes," Tochterman said, "but about everything that I love -- furniture, knickknacks." Tochterman is known in the industry for her whimsical feminine pieces, bold designs and unexpected color combinations, as well as a penchant for knits and vintage-inspired looks. The fashion of Petro Zillia is eclectic. It encompasses a retro sky blue cashmere sweater, with a rainbow and hearts on the front, but also a subtler, but still quirky navy silk wrap dress trimmed with pompoms, and a serious gray tweed flare skirt.

Her new store's interior reflects this point of view. Shoppers enter into an open space subtly divided into three sections. Up front, the feel is midcentury, with walls decked in mod orange and green wallpaper. Through the center, the mood changes to neoromantic. Tripartite walls are painted crackle pink on top, lime green in a center ribbon trimmed with gold-gilt molding and papered in a blue floral on the bottom. From the ceiling hangs a sizable chandelier that Tochterman says her husband found at "like a JCC donation center or something." (Drori is responsible for most of the interior design.) In the back is a shift to '70s psychedelic, complete with facing lime green loveseats: one tweed, one plastic.

Tochterman and Drori hope to make the location a hangout, in addition to a shopping destination. There are plans for a garden in the back under a big magnolia tree left by the previous tenant, the Shambhala Meditation Center. Next door to the store is a space the couple is converting into Tochterman's design studio -- one arena that has never felt foreign to her. Tochterman grew up in Tel Aviv with a fashion pedigree. Her mother had a chic boutique, and Tochterman said, "I used to go to her studio, and she allowed me to work on the overlock machine." By the time she was 7, Tochterman had learned how to knit, sew and cut fabric, and she eventually sold some of her pieces in her mom's store.

At 14, Tochterman moved to Los Angeles with her parents and siblings, but she had trouble adjusting and moved back to Israel after a year and a half, living with her grandmother while she finished school there.

She returned to Los Angeles after she graduated. Soon after, she moved to New York to work in the fashion industry. Capitalizing on a huge late '80s trend by making clip-on button covers, Tochterman founded a successful accessories line, Nony New York, with Drori in 1986.

They made the most of it while it lasted, but the trend was dead by 1995, and they closed the business. They traveled, had a brief stint as owners of a Caribbean hotel on Saint Martin and eventually found themselves back in Los Angeles with their infant son, Etai, living with Tochterman's parents.

Petro Zillia was born soon after -- an accessories line that quickly morphed into a full ready-to-wear collection. Some 10 years later, her designs have been featured in Vogue and W Magazine and worn by trendsetters like Jennifer Lopez, Cameron Diaz and Madonna.

Tochterman and Drori continue to work together on the business and personal life they share. The birth of Etai was followed four years later by a girl, Romie. The kids are now 11 and 7 years old, and in February the couple will celebrate their 20th anniversary.

Tochterman's open personality translates into her life as well as her work. In her identity, she feels herself more American than Israeli. But she's still "Eema" to the kids, and Drori is "Abba."

Religion, too, is a relaxed thing. They celebrate Jewish holidays with the extended family but do not observe much at home. In terms of religious school, Tochterman and Drori have not made it a priority. The kids attend a secular private school in Santa Monica, where they live.

One could say her diverse fashion sense applies to her worldview, as well.
"The way we see it, we want to raise good people, religion blind, color blind, sexual-orientation blind -- citizens of the world," Tochterman said. "I like looking at the spectrum of their friends. Indian, Jewish, Italian -- it represents the world better."

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