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Jewish Journal

JewishJournal.com

November 5, 1998

Radio Yiddish

NPR launches a new series of Jewish short stories and novel excerpts

http://www.jewishjournal.com/articles/item/radio_yiddish_19981106

When she was 16, KCRW General Manager Ruth Seymour was captivated by her studies with the Yiddish scholar Max Weinreich. "Yiddish is magic," he told her. "It will outwit history."

Seymour took his words to heart. Of late, she has been doing her part to help the mamaloshen survive. In 1995, she and KCRW teamed up with the National Yiddish Book Center to create "Jewish Short Stories," a National Public Radio series read by actors such as Leonard Nimoy and Jeff Goldblum. The program was a peculiar excursion in time-travel: back to the days of golems and rebbes and schlemiels all living together in the shtetl. Yiddish, apparently, worked its magic: At least half the NPR network ran the program, including markets as unlikely as Coos Bay, Ore., and Bozeman, Mont. KCRW sold well more than 1,000 cassette sets of the series.

This year, the program is back by popular demand, and because Seymour wanted to bring the series into the postmodern era.

"This is a darker, edgier series," says Seymour, adding that a Sholom Aleichem story explores the suicide of one of Tevye's daughters.

Once again, celebrities agreed to work for the union base rate of around $11 an hour -- perhaps because of the Yiddish yearnings latent in Ashkenazi DNA. William Shatner, Richard Dreyfuss and Ed Asner signed on, as did directors Arthur Hiller, Jeremy Kagan and Claudia Weil. "Chicago Hope" star Hector Elizondo, of Puerto Rican heritage, said that he was drawn to the series because he has converso blood.

The 18-part series, dubbed "Jewish Stories from the Old World to the New," includes stories and novel excerpts by authors such as Bernard Malamud, E.L. Doctorow, Saul Bellow and Max Apple. It also includes a number of works by women writers: Allegra Goodman's "The Four Questions" humorously explores the conflict between three generations of American Jews; Pearl Abraham's "The Romance Reader" focuses on a restless Chassidic woman; Leslea Newman's "A Letter to Harvey Milk" examines the friendship between an elderly Jewish man and his lesbian creative-writing teacher.

Ironically, Seymour, who has created Mexican and Korean short-story programming for KCRW, says the only critics of "Jewish Stories" have been...Jewish. "Some people fear that publicly celebrating our Jewish heritage will excite anti-Semitism, which is ridiculous," she says.

To buy a CD or audiocassette of the series, or for programming information, call (310) 450-5183 or (800) 292-3855.


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