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JewishJournal.com

September 8, 2005

PhD on the Flying Trapeze

http://www.jewishjournal.com/up_front/article/phd_on_the_flying_trapeze_20050909

You're on the flying trapeze, gliding fearlessly through the air. Keeping you aloft, 30 feet above gaping spectators, are your trusted teammates. Today, your welfare is in their hands. Tomorrow they'll go back to being -- the guys from accounting?

On that premise, Edy Greenblatt has built a new Southern California-based business.

Greenblatt is best known in Los Angeles as an energetic, knowledgeable folk dance teacher. But in search of a more stable career, she studied organizational behavior at the Harvard Business School, in a joint doctoral program involving Harvard's graduate schools of psychology and sociology. Her doctoral research on stress in the workplace took her to a string of Club Meds -- the better to investigate worker burnout.

At a Club Med in Florida, she first caught glimpse of a flying trapeze. It was love at first flight.

The 30-something Greenblatt saw "the most powerful tool for professional and personal transformation." Now, as president and "chief flying officer" of five-year-old Execu-Care Coaching and Consulting, she helps corporate managers hone communication and leadership skills by teaching them the knee-hang and the back-flip dismount from a bar swinging 30 feet off the ground.

It's not as terrifying as it sounds. Everyone wears a safety harness, and there's a net below. Greenblatt's staffers, who do the actual catching each time you fly through the air, have logged 10,000 hours of training and coaching time.

The trapeze requires intense collaboration, so the corporate execs build trust and self-confidence, which makes them more effective at work. That's the theory anyway.

At the very least, the experience fulfills many a childhood circus fantasy, and it's a deductible business expense.

The Chicago-born Greenblatt originally came to Los Angeles at 17 to pursue her passion for international folkdance, studying dance ethnology at UCLA and teaching dance all over the place. But eventually it dawned on her that leading novices through "Dodi Li" was no way for a nice Jewish girl to make a living. She also recognized that, as a dance leader, "I was spending my life fixing the damage caused by work and life." Rather than struggling to restore people's psyches through dance, she vowed to help transform the workplace that saps so many souls.

That led her to Harvard for her academic credentials and eventually to the trapeze.

In a way, she's come full circle. In high school, she sold peanuts and Cokes when Ringling Bros. came to town. When they moved on, she was sorely tempted to go with them. Now she uses circus tricks to teach the desk-bound how to soar.

For information, call (626) 644-7745 or edy@execu-care.com.

 

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