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January 24, 2008

LimmudLA: 4,000 years of Jewish history in one hour

http://www.jewishjournal.com/community_briefs/article/limmudla_4000_years_of_jewish_history_in_one_hour_20080125


David Solomon
With white butcher paper stretching around the room, David Solomon hurriedly scrawls timelines with his thick black marker, delineating 250-year blocks of time.

"Dudes, don't try this at home," he jokes with the audience of mostly 20- and 30-something participants.

In the space of the next hour -- plus an extra 10 to 15 minutes thrown in for good measure -- Solomon outlines the 4,000 years of Jewish history, from 2000 B.C.E. to the present. Each white paper wall represents 1,000 years, and as Solomon moves from Abraham to the 12 tribes, Moses, the prophets, the First and Second Temples, the Babylonian exile and the "PR stunt" of Chanukah, he works the room, swiveling the audience in its seats as he races from one side of the room to another.

"There's a purpose to the Jewish people besides handing down the recipe for gefilte fish," he tells the rapt group. "You don't have to be frum to believe that the Jewish people have a purpose in the world."

Welcome to "The Whole of Jewish History in One Hour" and the Solomon agenda, if this charmingly disheveled teacher has one. The 45-year-old Aussie, who says he feels -- and acts -- much younger than he is, utterly believes in the absolute necessity for Jews to know and understand Jewish history. Dividing the Jewish history timeline into phases provides people with a framework, Solomon says, and shows them "how amazing our history is."

Solomon will be one of dozens of teachers at LimmudLA Feb. 17-20 in Costa Mesa. The conference will feature a weekend packed with everything Jewish, from text studies to meditation minyans to arts performances. About 600 people are expected to attend the three-day President's Day weekend event, the first time the worldwide phenomenon is hitting the West Coast.

"In One Hour," as produced by Solomon and his wife, Marjorie, started out as something of a joke. At the end of 2004, the Solomons had returned to his native Perth after he had spent several years doing postgraduate research in Jewish mysticism at University College London. When Solomon was invited to address a conference of Jewish high school students, he somewhat flippantly came up with the idea of covering the whole of Jewish history in one hour. As the date neared, he found that his talk was being billed as such, and the idea caught on as a more permanent concept.

"It's really just ... a way of making sense of it all, so that people are able to contextualize and comprehend the history," Solomon says.

"In One Hour" is designed for a wide range of people, Solomon says. Some participants may simply want a better understanding of the framework of Jewish history, others may have a more solid background but haven't been able to envision the entire timeline.

During the talk, Solomon throws in Hebrew terms and names and does not translate. He sees the use of Hebrew as an important part of acculturating his audience to "speak about Jewish things in Jewish terms."

"There may be a gap between who it was designed for and who turns up," Solomon says. "It's a talk that attempts to give meaning; you don't have to believe in God."

In some ways, Solomon's "In One Hour" is the Jewish History 101 of the Taglit-Birthright Israel age. While successfully branding a new approach to a subject that may have faded in popularity, Solomon is very serious about his desire to use Jewish history as a method of propelling students toward more serious Jewish study.

He wants them to learn Hebrew and Jewish history as a "method of self empowerment," because he believes that the Jewish people have "lost" their "perspective." Looking back at Jewish history -- the Golden Age of Spain lasted a mere 700 years --Solomon wants to show the Jewish community outside of Israel that nothing lasts forever.

Learning Hebrew is a crucial part of Solomon's proposed framework. He sees the Hebrew language as the "gateway to Torah" and believes that Hebrew and living in Israel are the only ways to "authentically renew" Jewish spirituality.

Solomon himself took what he calls "a spiritual exile" from the Jewish world for some 10 years and now calls himself a secular Jew who keeps mitzvot (commandments). He grew up in a Sabbath-observant family in Perth, attending Jewish day school and then a Lubavitch-run college in Melbourne, followed by yeshiva in Israel. After living in London and Australia, he and his wife moved to Israel late last year after it became "increasingly apparent that we didn't feel at home anywhere except Israel."

Now living in Tel Aviv, the Solomons travel regularly, bringing "In One Hour" to communities in England, the United States and Australia. The format has evolved into an entire series, branching into other subjects, including Bible, philosophy, women in Jewish history and Hebrew, as well as an expanded, nine-session version of the history course.

"I'm not interested in hoisting my own petard," says Solomon, as intense in conversation as he is in teaching. "There really isn't a script to this. The narrative just comes out, and these," he says, pointing at the time-lined walls, "are the headlines."

For more information on LimmudLA, visit http://LimmudLA.org

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