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October 5, 2006

It’s mayor meets mayor at Temple of the Arts; Women of vision see Jews’ future in Iran

http://www.jewishjournal.com/community_briefs/article/its_mayor_meets_mayor_at_temple_of_the_arts_women_of_vision_see_jews_future

Julie Sager, Zionist Organization of America's National Director of Campus Activities (left), stands with Goldwasser and David Iskowitz, president of Jewish Association of Marshall Students, and Shervin Lelezary, president of USC's Jewish Law Students Association.

Julie Sager, Zionist Organization of America's National Director of Campus Activities (left), stands with Goldwasser and David Iskowitz, president of Jewish Association of Marshall Students, and Shervin Lelezary, president of USC's Jewish Law Students Association.

It's mayor meets mayor at Temple of the Arts
 
Mayor Yona Yahov of Haifa received a standing ovation after his Kol Nidre address at Temple of the Arts in Beverly Hills Sunday night. A few minutes earlier, by way of introducing Yahov, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke candidly about the feeling of disorientation his famously frenetic schedule tends to induce.
 
"It's almost like not knowing where I am at any given moment," Villaraigosa confessed.
 
Luckily, the sound of Hebrew prayers and his recollection of a Yom Kippur appointment at a temple in Northridge earlier in the evening helped Villaraigosa get his bearings. During his brief remarks he praised his counterpart from Haifa as a man of peace.
 
In his sermon on the seed of resiliency, Rabbi David Barron spoke more pointedly about Yahov's aptness as a speaker at Sunday's service. Citing Yahov's ongoing efforts to create understanding between Arabs and Jews, Barron called Yahov "a man who is practicing forgiveness, which we are here to reflect on."
 
"This has been an awkward, unprecedented war," Yahov said at the beginning of his speech. "It has not been soldiers against soldiers or ships against ships." Yahov said that when a rocket struck the Carmelite monastery above Haifa at the onset of the conflict, a local investigator at the scene was puzzled to find tiny ball-bearings scattered about the area.
 
"We learned these are often packed into the belts of suicide bombers," Yahov said, "to widen the effect of the blast."
 
When it become clear that civilians were to be the targets of Hezbollah's missile campaign, Yahov said one of his first concerns was to keep life as normal as possible for Haifa's children, even under the city's constant curfew. Soft laughter rippled through the audience when Yahov, a big silver-haired bear of a man, asked, "Can you imagine what to do with your kids if they were stuck in your house for a month?"
 
Yahov's solution was to place his city's youngest citizens in a very familiar environment. Each day of the conflict, from early morning until late afternoon, thousands of Haifa's children were sheltered on the lower levels of underground parking garages at the city's shopping malls.
 
"No enemy can destroy our life," Yahov said.
 
After he thanked the congregation for its support, he concluded his remarks by saying, "We showed the whole world that the Jewish people are one people."
 
-- Nick Street, Contributing Writer

Women of vision see Jews' future in Iran
 
Amidst growing tensions between Iran and the United States in recent months, the Iranian Jewish Women's Organization (IJWO) in Los Angeles is planning a seminar at the Museum of Tolerance focusing on the future security of Jews living in Iran today.
 
The event, scheduled for Oct. 10 and organized by the Women of Vision chapter of IJWO, will include prominent Persian Jewish activists, leaders and intellectuals from Europe and Israel, as well as Los Angeles, and aims to shed light on the political, social, and psychological challenges faced by the approximately 20,000 Jews in Iran.
 
"We didn't really select this seminar or its topic because we wanted to make a statement about ourselves as women, rather because it is an important topic that has not been addressed by the Iranian Jewish community nor the larger American Jewish community," said Sharon Baradaran, one of the volunteer organizers of the IJWO seminar.
 
Baradaran said the seminar is particularly significant for opening new dialogue between the various factions within the Persian Jewish community that for years have often been at odds with one another on how to best address the anti-Semitic and anti-Israel rhetoric of Iran's fundamentalist regime without jeopardizing the lives of Jews still living in Iran.
 
"While every panel member has been very sensitive to safeguarding the best interest of the Jewish community, to address difficult questions about the future of the community in Iran is critical and if that means certain disagreements, then they should be discussed," Baradaran said.
 
Local Persian Jews have expressed concern for the security of Iran's Jews in recent months, following false media reports in May that the Iranian government had approved legislation requiring Jews to wear yellow bands on their clothing. In July, Iranian state-run television aired a pro-Hezbollah rally held by Jews living in the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, in what many local Persian Jewish activists believe was a propaganda stunt organized by the regime to show national solidarity for Hezbollah.
 
Maurice Motamed, the Jewish representative to the Iranian parliament, had been slated as a panelist for the seminar but withdrew, saying he will not be arriving in Los Angeles until after the seminar, Baradaran said. Some local Persian Jewish activists have expressed concern over public comments from Motamed during the past year, including his praise for Iran's uranium enrichment program and his opposition to Israeli military actions against Palestinian terrorists in Gaza and Hezbollah terrorists in Southern Lebanon.
 
In January, Parviz Yeshaya, the former national chairman of the Jewish Council in Iran, issued a rare public statement questioning the logic of Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad who had called the Holocaust a "myth".
 
The Iranian Jewish Women's organization was originally set up in 1947 in Iran and later re-established in 1976 in Los Angeles with the objective of recognizing the impact of Iranian Jewish women in the community. In 2002, the Women of Vision chapter and other chapters were added to the organization in an effort to reach out to younger generations of Iranian Jewish women.
 
The IWJO seminar will be held at the Museum of Tolerance on Oct. 10 at 6 p.m. For ticket information contact the IWJO at (818) 929-5936 or visit www.ijwo.org.
 
-- Karmel Melamed, Contributing Writer
 
Captured soldier's brother addresses students
 
Gadi Goldwasser -- brother of Ehud Goldwasser, one of two Israeli soldiers captured on July 12 and still held by Hezbollah -- spoke recently to students at UCLA and USC during a brief visit to Los Angeles. He addressed the business and law schools at USC, as well as Hillel and Chabad student groups during their Shabbat dinners.

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