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JewishJournal.com

September 21, 2006

Iconic Italian journalist, Oriana Fallaci, 77

http://www.jewishjournal.com/obituaries/article/iconic_italian_journalist_oriana_fallaci_77_20060922

The crusading Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci spent the last years of her life issuing fiery warnings against a Muslim world that she saw poised to overrun the West.
 
Critics accused Fallaci of sowing racial and religious hatred, but she became a heroine to many Jews and Israelis for her vocal defense of Israel and denunciations of new forms of anti-Semitism.
 
"She was the most loved and most hated woman in Italy," said Clemente Mimun, the Jewish director of Italian television's main news program.
 
Fallaci, who divided her later years between New York and her native Florence, died last Friday in Florence after a long battle with cancer. She was 77. A glamorous woman always seen with long hair and thick eye-liner and a cigarette poised in her fingers, Fallaci was a war correspondent in Vietnam and fought as a child in the anti-fascist resistance during World War II.

She never married but had a passionate affair with the Greek left-wing activist Alekos Panagulis in the mid-1970s. After his death in an automobile accident, she wrote a book based on his life, "A Man," that sold 3.5 million copies. Fallaci became a celebrity icon in the 1960s and 1970s with incisive, baring interviews of global VIPs including Henry Kissinger, PLO leader Yasser Arafat, Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir and Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. She also wrote a series of novels and other books.
 
The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, marked a watershed.
 
Fallaci's "The Rage and the Pride," a vehement defense of the United States published soon after the attacks, became a best seller and provoked a storm of controversy with its strong language and uncompromising positions.
 
She followed with further books and articles that lambasted the West for weakness in the face of Islam and minced no words in her criticism of Muslims in general.
 
Islam, she wrote in her last book, "The Force of Reason," "sows hatred in place of love and slavery in place of freedom."
 
One of her most famous essays was a blistering attack on anti-Semitism published in April 2002 that read like a manifesto.
 
Repeating over and over the assertion "I find it shameful," Fallaci unleashed a brutal indictment of Italy, Italians, the Catholic church, the left wing, the media, politically correct pacifists and Europeans in general for abandoning Israel and fomenting a new wave of anti-Semitism linked to the Mideast crisis. In the essay, Fallaci, who long had held pro-Palestinian views, declared herself "disgusted with the anti-Semitism of many Italians, of many Europeans" and "ashamed of this shame that dishonors my country and Europe."
 
"I find it shameful," she wrote," and I see in all this the resurgence of a new fascism, a new Nazism."
 
She recalled that in the past "I fought often, and bitterly, with the Israelis, and I defended the Palestinians a lot -- maybe more than they deserved.
 
"Nonetheless, I stand with Israel, I stand with the Jews," she wrote. "I defend their right to exist, to defend themselves, and not to allow themselves to be exterminated a second time."
 

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