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JewishJournal.com

June 21, 2007

I heart Hollywood endings

http://www.jewishjournal.com/singles/article/i_heart_hollywood_endings_20070622

Esther Hersh

Esther Hersh

I met "Mr. Nice Guy" more than three years ago, and I cherish our special connection -- he's affectionate, understanding, a good listener, open-minded, practical ...

I could go on and on. I felt fortunate that we found each other, and he indicated the same. We both want the best things life has to offer. At this time in my life he's the kind of partner I'm looking for. With his work schedule and other commitments, I knew from the get-go I would have to be kind and very flexible. That's not an issue for me.

"Mr. Nice Guy" said more than once, "I'll always be your friend." Now I'm puzzled and confused because I've received an e-mail from him saying, "I met someone." What does that mean? Does it mean what I think it means? He seems to have an odd definition of friendship. I thought I misinterpreted the message, so I asked him to meet me for a face-to-face conversation. I received a reply that he had no problem with that idea and would e-mail me when he got back from his business trip. Well, I'm still waiting.

Our friendship has been somewhat nontraditional and had a life of its own. I'm guessing that this could be the end of "Mr. Nice Guy." I cannot tell a lie; I'm very hurt -- devastated. I feel as if I have been pushed off a cliff (while he was proclaiming friendship), landed on jagged rocks and broken glass and got bruised from head to toe. I lost 10 pounds (not from dieting). You may be asking what his issues are. I really don't know. I feel I had a secret trial, was found guilty, convicted and sentenced.

In hindsight, I feel I was used and discarded like an old Costco catalogue. Apparently, I'm still naive and too trusting of people when they act sincere. I take people at their word. I don't take friendship lightly; it's serious to me. Friendship is a long-term commitment that has meaning; it's being loyal and accepting the other person as is, the good parts along with the blemishes. Occasionally he mentioned our differences, but when I asked for specifics, I never got a direct response. I pointed out that differences add spice to a friendship.

The other side of it is, we both know we have many things in common. I suggested we focus on the things in common. Over the years, we have shared many things about ourselves and our families. We have traditional values, and family is important to both of us. However, I now have learned a lot about "Mr. Nice Guy's" character. He's good at hiding behind e-mail.

I believe our paths crossed for a reason -- to bring both of us joy and happiness, not to bring me heartbreak and grief. Like everyone else, we both need to be needed and want to be wanted. Yet I think now it may be time for me to take the advice of a close friend: "Walk away. He's not worth it." However, my emotional side is a little slow at catching up with my intellectual side.

These days I'm getting my accolades from doing stand-up comedy. All my tears and pain provide lots of comic material. I'm definitely unique and have a niche. If someone had told me a few years ago that I would be doing stand-up, writing my own material and enjoying it, I never would have believed it. I'm starting to pinch myself occasionally -- just to be sure this is really happening. I'm enjoying my new-found skin; however, inside I'm still the same down-to-earth, sensitive, friendly and generous person I've always been. I'm playful, fun to be with and funny -- that's all part of my charm and likeability.

And I'm an equal-opportunity offender: people I meet never know when they might become a one-liner in my routine. My friends think this is great -- spunky and gutsy of me. They admit they couldn't do it, and they are supportive.

I love the attention that the laughs and the applause bring. All friends (new and old) are welcome to come along on my journey -- it's an E-ticket ride, an unpredictable adventure, and I know my sons, their families, and my other relatives are proud of me and my many accomplishments. But in private I'm still a romantic, a daydreamer -- and I still believe in the old notion of boy chases girl, boy catches girl. I guess that, despite the fact that I'm making my way in the modern world, I still want the old-fashioned, happy Hollywood ending.

Esther W. Hersh can be reached at EWH1121@aol.com

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