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JewishJournal.com

December 28, 2006

Fran Rosenfield: All About the Children

http://www.jewishjournal.com/articles/item/fran_rosenfield_all_about_the_children_20061229

Fran Rosenfield
Barri Evins

Alex Baum

Betty Neymark

Eve Marcus

Fran Rosenfield

Marilyn Harran

Noah Bleich

Rebecca Levinson

Yehoram Uziel

Yoram Hassid

Fran Rosenfield answers the door of her Northridge home a few moments after the musical doorbell has cycled through its tune. This 79-year-old grandmother was slowed by a recent spinal injury that has rendered her dependent on a cane or walker to get around. But her passion for a cause she championed 15 years ago is going strong.

Inside, her dining room has been transformed into a makeshift shipping department. On the table are wrapped gifts stacked three- and four-boxes deep that are waiting to go to children who are autistic, chronically ill, poor, abused or neglected. Hundreds of gifts were picked up the previous week, and now this batch has to be cleared out to make room for more that will soon arrive.

Welcome to Fran's Project.

"I do what I do because it's what I have to do," said Rosenfield, who is known as Bubbe Fran at Northridge's Temple Ahavat Shalom. "I can't stand the thought that anywhere there is a child who is hungry or doing without."

Her inspiration for the project came from the Adopt a Child Abuse Caseworker Program, which she helped a fellow congregant pitch to the Valley Interfaith Council in 1991.

"These caseworkers are overloaded, and they can't keep track of everything," she said.

Rosenfield started out collecting donations for one caseworker from the Department of Children and Family Service, and found she was so successful at motivating people to give that she adopted another caseworker a year later. Before long the former personnel manager had adopted the entire North Hollywood office.

"You hear stories, like a mother and two kids who are living in a garage on $325 a month or a family whose gas was turned off," she said. "How can you not want to help these people?"

For Rosenfield, the only December dilemma has been how to collect more gifts than the previous year. This former sisterhood president collected more than 1,000 gifts in 2005, which she donated to four different agencies, including Family Friends, a project of Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles. For 2006, she added Jay Nolan Autistic Services to her roster of groups that receive her gifts.

Every morning in the run-up to Christmas, Rosenfield gets on the computer and phone with her list of names and uses her "Jewish mother guilt like crazy, honey."

The gifts donated to her program from synagogue members and others range in price from $20 to $100, and include toys, clothing, grocery scrip and gas cards. Rosenfield was hoping to break her 2005 record by collecting between 1,500 to 2,000 gifts to put under children's trees.

Born in Minnesota, Rosenfield moved with her husband, Lenn, to Panorama City in 1950.

"We didn't even have a phone for the first three years," said her husband, a former advertising art director who designs the annual posters for Fran's Project.

Rosenfield's efforts reflect a family tradition of responding to a crisis. After Hitler came to power, her father rented a home in Minneapolis, declared it a synagogue and brought one or two family members over at a time to serve as its rabbi or cantor. Her father would then find work for the newly arrived relative and put in another request to fill the empty leadership position.

Building on her success with Fran's Project, Rosenfield recently started a birthday twinning program at Temple Ahavat Shalom. A Hebrew school student is paired up with a child in need whose birthday is on or near the same day, and she provides them with a gift suggestion list.

"I tell them that there are kids who are not as lucky as they are whose parents can't afford to give them birthday parties and gifts," said Rosenfield, who serves as the synagogue's social action chair.

While Rosenfield says she doesn't know what drives her to do what she does, she counts herself as one of the luckiest people in the world.

"How many people can feel that they've made a difference in a child's life, and then do that by thousands?" she said.

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