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JewishJournal.com

September 10, 2008

Documentary goes behind the music video with Chutzpah

http://www.jewishjournal.com/film/article/documentary_goes_behind_the_video_with_chutzpah_20080910

Tor Hyams (center) with his band Chutzpah

Tor Hyams (center) with his band Chutzpah

Tor Hyams was startled to discover that his Jewish rap group, Chutzpah, had become the subject of an arty short documentary -- Juliet Landau's "Take Flight" -- which will be the centerpiece of The Hollywood Hill's inaugural BigBrainBoy Mobile Media Summit that takes place on Sept. 12 and 13.

"But at the same time I also wasn't so surprised, because there's something very strange about our group: We call it 'The Legend of Chutzpah,'" he said. "Wacky things have always happened to us that we never planned -- and that we didn't particularly try for because Chutzpah is a pet project, not the main part of our lives."

Hyams, a veteran TV composer and record producer, was working with artists such as Lisa Loeb and Perry Farrell when he began writing Jewish rap on a lark back in 2005. Within months, Chutzpah had released "Eponymous," its debut CD; a DVD "hip-hop-u-mentary," featuring celebrity cameos by Gary Oldman and Sharon Osbourne, which screened at the HBO and Aspen comedy festivals; a music video, "Chanukah's Da Bomb" which played on MTV, and write-ups in myriad publications (The New York Times calls it "a cross between Eminem and Woody Allen"). Now a second album, "Hip Hop Fantasy," is slated for release Nov. 11, along with a new music video, for the song, "Red Rover," directed by Oldman. And that video is the subject of "Take Flight," which is already earning buzz in media circles.

Hyams, who is originally from Larchmont, N.Y., said he was "working on five projects at once" several years ago when a friend asked him to help write a Yiddish rap song.


'Take Flight' trailer

"I absolutely loved it," he recalled. "It was like I was possessed, and I started creating hip-hop beats and writing lyrics."

Hyams enlisted the help of his cousin, David Scharff, and together they "busted out five tracks" in just two weeks in the producer's Los Feliz studio. The songs included "Old School Jew" ("I was going really 'old school,'" he says of the rap term. "We're talking an abridged history of the Hebrew bible.") and "In the Shtetl," a riff on "In the Ghetto" by Oakland rapper Too Short.

"My big idea for the CD was, 'Let's give this to our families for Chanukah,'" Hyams said. "I never thought we'd get a record deal, because I figured 'This is stupid and Jewish and no one cares except us.'"

Later, during a tense business meeting, Hyams joked that if the deal at hand didn't work out, the executives could sign his Jewish rap group. "Everybody laughed," Hyams recalled, "but when I got home, there was an e-mail saying that if I was serious, I should contact this new label, the Jewish Music Group [JMG], which was looking for talent." Shout Factory's JMG signed the group on a handshake.

When the company ordered a music video, Hyams played lead rapper "Master Tav," Scharff was the Jewish rastafarian philosopher and an actor friend, Jerran Friedman, portrayed the deranged MC Meshugenah, who often appeared in a straightjacket.

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2006 music video 'Ask the rabbi' -- note straightjacket

Many reviewers subsequently lauded Chutzpah, which billed itself as "the first Jewish hip-hop supergroup" (never mind Matisyahu or 2 Live Jews). But some described it as a novelty act -- a label that chagrined Hyams. He said he intends his music to be serious and that he is inspired by rap greats such as LL Cool J and Snoop Dogg.

Chutzpah's second CD, he added, is a "concept album" in which each song describes the saga of how the bandmates have unexpectedly lived out their hip-hop fantasies. Oldman -- who has been Hyams' friend since their children attended the same preschool -- raps on one of the songs and asked to direct Chutzpah's new music video. "Gary thinks being Jewish is cool for some reason," Hyams said. "He'd always say, 'You know, Tor, I could be Jewish; I could change my name to Larry Goldman" (which is how he is credited on the new music video).

The video is shot entirely on Nokia cell- phones and features the song, "Red Rover," a "battle rap" challenging Chutzpah's critics (including Matisyahu, who reportedly told Hyams that Chutzpah disgraces Judaism.) It depicts the group members wearing Speedos and Jewish bling while playing the children's game red rover with bikini-clad babes. Hyams dons a clown nose to dis Matisyahu, and MC Meshugenah attempts to snorkel in a wading pool emblazoned with a Star of David.

While Oldman was shooting Hyams et al, Landau ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Angel") was filming a "making of" documentary about the video -- which turned into a lyrical film about Oldman's creative process. "I could see Gary coming up with ideas and carrying them out with great precision," Landau said. "I wanted viewers to feel like they were inside his head."

For Hyams, watching the film brought one more surprise.

"I thought the movie would be kind of dumb, because we're kind of dumb," he said. "But it was so moving, I actually got a little choked up."

Juliet Landau and "Red Rover" director of photography Deverill Weekes will conduct a Q & A after "Take Flight" screenings, on Sept. 13.

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