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JewishJournal.com

February 23, 2006

Campus Outreach Connects Orthodox

http://www.jewishjournal.com/education/article/campus_outreach_connects_orthodox_20060224

At the Enormous Activities Fair during UCLA's Welcome Week last September, Sharona Kaplan stepped away from her own brochure-laden table to help out at the busier Hillel table.

A first-year student perusing Hillel's sign-up sheet seemed stuck on one question.

"So what kind of services are you looking for? Liberal, Conservative, Orthodox?" Kaplan asked her.

"The least religious," the girl said, and Kaplan helped her mark the box for "Reform."

That doesn't bother Kaplan at all -- each student should find what's appropriate for him or her, she believes.

But her particular mission is to serve Orthodox Jews and to encourage observant Judaism.

Sharona Kaplan and her husband, Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan, both 26, arrived in September 2004 through the Jewish Learning Initiative on Campus(JLIC), a program sponsored by the Orthodox Union, Hillel and the Torah Mitzion organization to serve the needs of Orthodox students.

Since the program began five years ago, it has anchored couples on 12 U.S. campuses -- three of them newly placed this past September -- as well as at Oxford University in England. Each couple is a young rabbi and his wife, charged with teaching classes, running Shabbat programs, ensuring that religious services and kosher food are available and providing a frum-friendly atmosphere for students coming out of the Orthodox day school world.

Over the past year the Kaplans have instituted weekly Shabbat lunches and holiday meals at Hillel, and they invite students to their home for Shabbat meals when the university is closed.

They also strengthened the daily minyans, Sharona Kaplan says, noting that her husband "wakes the boys up and drives around picking them up" to make sure they get to shacharit services on time.

In many ways, the JLIC program is similar to campus programs run by the Chabad organization. The JLIC couples, however, are sent mainly to serve students who already are Orthodox, whereas Chabad couples actively reach out to the entire Jewish spectrum.

Though JLIC couples welcome every Jew to their programs -- and would be happy to shepherd nonobservant young people down the frum path -- that's not their mandate.

"The primary purpose is to serve the needs of the Orthodox population," says Rabbi Ilan Haber, the program's national director, who works out of Hillel headquarters in Washington. "It's not an outreach program, it's an in-reach to Orthodox students."

Haber says an important aspect of the program is sending a couple to each college: "We feel there's a need for both male and female role models for the students."

This point is driven home on a September afternoon at Brooklyn College in New York where Nalini Ibragimov is teaching Torah to nine young women. It's the students' two-hour free period, which the college gives twice a week to encourage clubs and sports.

Instead of eating a longer lunch or going swimming, these nine modestly dressed students are discussing with Ibragimov, their rebbetzin on campus, the finer points of the 39 malachot, or acts of labor forbidden on Shabbat.

Nalini Ibragimov, 28, and her husband, 30-year-old Rabbi Reuven Ibragimov, were sent to Brooklyn College three years ago.

Four of the nine women in Nalini Ibragimov's class spent last year studying in Jerusalem at all-girls seminaries. All say they're thrilled to have the Ibragimovs on campus.

Meira Sanders, 19, says she likes "just having a rabbi you can ask questions."

Sarah Roller, 18, says, "It's really important to have an Orthodox woman to look up to."

Several of the young women say the JLIC presence eases their transition from high school, where at least half their classes were on religious subjects. One-third of Brooklyn College's 10,000 students are Jewish, but this is a first experience in a primarily secular world for these nine students, and they're anxious for regular doses of Yiddishkeit.

"If there weren't religious studies here, I don't think I would have come," Roller says.

Haber, the national program director, says that as more and more Modern Orthodox began attending universities other than Yeshiva University and its affiliate for women, Stern College, the traditional choices for this community, Orthodox leaders and parents saw the need to provide ongoing religious counseling and services to them during their campus years.

Some Reform and Conservative students look at the JLIC program and wish their movements would fund professionals on campus, too. Both the Reform and Conservative movements depend on student volunteers to do campus outreach.

"Between JLIC, Chabad and JAM," a Southern California-based Orthodox outreach program, "the Orthodox are investing hundreds of thousands of dollars, and the Reform and Conservative are giving zero," says Rabbi Chaim Seidler-Feller, UCLA's longtime Hillel director.

"If a kid wants to study Talmud," he can benefit from the Orthodox rabbi, Seidler-Feller says. "But what if he wants to study Buber?"

The answer, for now, is that such students will have to rely on secular coursework.

Still, the goal of funding campus professionals is "important" to the Conservative leadership, says Rabbi Jerome Epstein, executive vice president of the United Synagogue for Conservative Judaism. "We are trying to find the financial wherewithal to do it."

A Reform movement leader considers such aspirations a "fantasy" for his movement, given that there are Reform students on several hundred campuses.

"I even question the efficacy of it," says Rabbi Daniel Freelander, vice president of the Union for Reform Judaism, adding that a Reform rabbinic presence on campus wouldn't solve the challenge of keeping Reform students Jewishly involved through their college years.

"The involved students are wonderful, and they crave as much rabbinic input as we can give them, but they're a tiny minority" of the overall student population, he says. "If we put a rabbi on every campus, would [involved students] increase from 5 percent to 10 percent or 20 percent? I doubt it."

For more information on Camp Gan Israel Running Springs, call Chabad Youth Programs at (310) 208-7511, ext. 1270.

 

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